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  Signing history and experience: Buzz Aldrin (Page 4)

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Author Topic:   Signing history and experience: Buzz Aldrin
AJ
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posted 05-20-2011 12:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AJ   Click Here to Email AJ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by JasonB:
Can anyone verify that Aldrin signs theough the mail for a fee?
I'm curious about this as well. The cS address page indicates to contact Steve Hankow at Farthest Reaches. I did so at least a month ago and never received a response. I also don't want to send an item and money if there's a chance I won't get either back.

mjanovec
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posted 05-20-2011 02:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AJ:
I did so at least a month ago and never received a response.
When a dealer isn't good about responding to basic e-mails, you're best advised to go elsewhere for your signature.

I would suggest obtaining Aldrin's signature at an in-person signing (Spacefest or the ASF show) or wait for an announced mail-in signing (Astronaut Central aka Novaspace). If you can't attend an in-person signing, I'm sure there are people here on collectSPACE that are willing to collect a signature for you.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-20-2011 03:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The address listed on collectSPACE is not related to Farthest Reaches. While I have no reason to think it is not still valid, you could send a letter to that address asking if you could send your item to be signed and verifying the fee requested in return. If the address is valid (and again, I have no information saying it is not) you should receive a response from Dr. Aldrin's assistant and then you'll be good to proceed as desired.

AJ
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posted 05-20-2011 07:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AJ   Click Here to Email AJ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I know that the address isn't connected to Farthest Reaches, but I have an item that may possibly be more expensive than a standard base price. I'd like to find out beforehand what the price is. Because the website says, contact so-and-so, I did so. I haven't received a response. Ok, fine, time to move on. It's not that I don't trust the address, but I'd like to have an idea of what I'm getting into and who is handling my item before I willy-nilly mail it.

I'm going to go with the advice of doing it in person at this point. Way, way easier and less irritating.

ilbasso
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posted 05-21-2011 10:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Steve at Farthest Reaches appears to have a very aggressive spam filter on his email, even for regular customers. He's easier to reach by phone and is generally very quick to return calls.

JasonB
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posted 09-02-2011 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JasonB   Click Here to Email JasonB     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anyone have any luck confirming if Aldrin's address still works to mail him an item to sign with payment?

I tried sending an email to his site and it was simply stuck on "please wait" when I sent it. I can't imagine sending $500 somewhere and never hearing back. Just wondering. Thanks.

J.L
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posted 09-02-2011 02:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for J.L   Click Here to Email J.L     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With the current state of affairs, I don't know if I would feel comfortable mailing anything to Buzz right now. Probably best done in person.

AJ
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posted 09-02-2011 07:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AJ   Click Here to Email AJ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That is very, very good advice.

Also, the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation show is just around the corner, so even if you aren't going yourself, you have a good chance of finding a friendly fellow forum member who will be there who could get it signed for you.

shadow1789
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posted 04-06-2012 10:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for shadow1789   Click Here to Email shadow1789     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was thinking of attending Autographica later this year until I read these post about the ridiculous prices Buzz charges for his signature. And why does he seem fit to charge more for a completion? This to me just sounds an absolute rip off.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-06-2012 10:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Buzz Aldrin charges what he does because he can command those fees. His appearances are still met with a line of collectors desiring his autograph.

And even if he didn't, like all astronauts, he is free to set his own signing policies.

If you desire his autograph but cannot afford his direct price, you can usually find secondhand examples selling for less, depending on the type of item. If it's only the signature that matters to you, then that may be the best solution.

NovaRob
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posted 04-06-2012 02:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NovaRob   Click Here to Email NovaRob     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Buzz is not the only astronaut that charges extra for a completion.

Daugherty54
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posted 04-06-2012 05:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daugherty54   Click Here to Email Daugherty54     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Buzz's fees are not really all that unreasonable. John Young charges more, for example. Considering the signature is of the second man ever to set foot on the moon on the first landing and it's probably a fair price.

Now, Buzz may be the only astronaut that charges a completion for a blank photo, but it's a free market - if you want it, pay it, if you don't just walk away. So far not many elect to walk.

Kite
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posted 04-06-2012 05:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kite     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My suggestion to our new member is to take Robert's advice. I have been unable to justify paying the high prices for autographs but am just pleased to go to these events and meet these legends who without exception have been willing to shake hands, have a conversation and answer any questions I have asked even though I have informed them that I wont be purchasing a signature. Out of respect I try not to be too intrusive.

In 2000 I did buy Alan Bean's book and he gladly signed it with a personal inscription. At Autographica I attend as many of the talks as I can which are very reasonably priced and which is quite sufficient for me. The fact is I have met these people who when they were making history I never dreamt that one day I would.

At Ken Willoughby's presentations the talk usually includes an autograph in the price of the ticket or just a small charge. I have seen Al Worden twice but managed to buy his signed autobiography through Farthest Reaches, who post on this forum, for just the delivery charge extra to the book price.

Buzz Aldrin gave a talk at the Royal Festival Hall in London a few years ago and I bought his book which had his signature on a bookplate inside which I was more than pleased with.

Although it is nice to have an autograph to me it is not the most important thing. I am just happy to have met them and feel honoured to have done so thanks to the people who make this possible.

My only regret is that I did not know of collectSPACE earlier and missed many chances of meeting other astronauts who I would have loved to have met but I still live in hope that I may still do so in future.

GACspaceguy
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posted 04-07-2012 06:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is my take on signing fees, extra words and completions. Jackie and I will sell anyone on the forum our individual signature on a 8x10 glossy of our living room display for $10 and if we both sign it will be an additional $10 for a crew completion. Would you do it? I would say not. Why, because it holds no value for you.

What you need to decide is; what is the value of that signed item worth to you? At the last ASF signing we had planned on two Buzz signatures, one on our LM model (and that spot is still open on the LM itself, as Buzz did not make the signing) the other on the "Wonder of it All" poster.

Before we went we counted up our Buzz signed items, we have 16 of them. So was it worth paying the ($400x2)+$100 (3D item) +$50 (mission number) = $950 to add another Buzz signature to our collection. Yes, and for us it was, the LM model discussion is already on this site and the poster had a sentimental value that for us was and is priceless.

We were willing to pay that amount for those items to be signed; it was not just the signature. The last signature we picked up of Buzz was $35 in one of his fictional books. But I could not take that inexpensive signature and place it on our desired items. But what I did do is I turned it into a display for a friend at work for a total of $100 of framing and pictures.

I know it is frustrating to pay a lot of money for something you would really like to have, especially when just four years ago it was less than half the current price. I have no pity for the people that take a dozen of 8x10 WSS shot to have signed for resale; it makes no sense to do that with all of the availability of Buzz's signature out there. To me they are at the event for all the wrong reasons, for them they are okay with it.

For me it is interesting that it was okay to pay John Young $595 for his signature as "he never signs" but for a guy who signs all the time, $400 is "ridiculous," when they are both equal in historic value (let us not debate that statement and just take it in context). We pay for what we hold as valuable. Decide the value for you and determine your actions based on that decision.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 04-07-2012 07:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Funny (or not) Buzz story: At the MIT+150 event were about half a dozen astronauts, including Aldrin. Granted, he was in a wheelchair and that may have something to do with it, but before and after the event, people for the most part shied away from asking Aldrin for an autograph.

Just to play devil's advocate, I will throw out there probably the hardest thing for some people to accept is an astronaut charging a fee, when on occasion they will sign without a fee (and it's not just Aldrin.) I won't repeat my argument that there's really no such thing as a "free" autograph. But I will surmise that there would be less debate if a person was more consistent, e.g. "I'm sorry but I don't sign in-person. However, if you send me your items at this address, I'll be more than happy to for this amount for my time."

machbusterman
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posted 04-07-2012 01:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for machbusterman   Click Here to Email machbusterman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Daugherty54:
Considering the signature is of the second man ever to set foot on the moon on the first landing and it's probably a fair price.
Fair price? That'll be why the market value for Buzz's signature on an uninscribed Kodak glossy is circa $189 then. His signature is far from rare... and in my opinion is grossly overpriced!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-07-2012 01:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If you think it is overpriced, then don't pay it.

There are plenty of people who would pay his current fee (and perhaps even more) to have the opportunity to (a) meet him and (b) have something they desire signed be autographed. To each their own.

machbusterman
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posted 04-07-2012 01:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for machbusterman   Click Here to Email machbusterman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Don't worry... I won't pay it. I've done my fair share of paying for in-person autographs from Buzz and I'll be honest, I baulked once the base fee went above $250.

The "average" collector has now been priced out of the market and just because he can command such a fee doesn't make it right and fair. Considering his fame was only made possible by the US taxpayer I think its actually pretty distasteful to charge what he does.

JasonB
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posted 04-07-2012 01:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JasonB   Click Here to Email JasonB     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Say what you will about Aldrin's pricing, but at least he's giving people the option to get their stuff signed. To me that's far preferable to someone who doesn't sign at all.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-07-2012 01:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by machbusterman:
Considering his fame was only made possible by the US taxpayer I think its actually pretty distasteful to charge what he does.
Aldrin signed for free for about four decades, less we forget.

And Aldrin, nor any of his fellow astronauts, sought out their initial fame. Nor was their fame part of their job responsibility for the government. Taxpayers received in spades what they paid for: successful missions.

Just because the astronauts were civil servants does not mean they are indentured servants for life.

davidcwagner
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posted 04-07-2012 02:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for davidcwagner   Click Here to Email davidcwagner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Buzz signed for free at a 2001 space conference in Albuquerque. He was especially patient with children. Signed my item that had a really nice Armstrong signature for free without a blink.

Paid $600 in 2008 for Aldrin to sign an Apollo model and add Apollo XI LMP Columbia Eagle. It was a bargain. He cheerfully posed for photos with previously signed items like a flown A11 flight plan page.

I may not get another item signed at the current prices but I am grateful for the opportunity to choose.

mjanovec
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posted 04-08-2012 12:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
And Aldrin, nor any of his fellow astronauts, sought out their initial fame.

That's debatable. Everyone knew (even the Mercury 7) that being an astronaut would be one of the most high profile jobs in the country, with the rewards that came with that level of fame. Being one of the first to land on the moon would lead to even more fame. And, most certainly, the first man to walk on the moon would capture the most fame of all.

Aldrin lobbied for the privilege to walk on the moon first. He clearly knew, even back in the 60s, that there was a special level of fame for whomever got the honor.

While I can believe that some astronauts did not purposely seek out their fame, it's somewhat naive to assume that none of them sought out fame.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-08-2012 05:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
While its certainly true that not all the astronauts turned away from the fame that was granted them, what I meant to convey was that none of them have said they became astronauts to become famous.

But even if each sought the spotlight, they weren't being paid to be famous and placing restrictions on them now because fame followed them is unreasonable.

Dave Clow
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posted 04-09-2012 11:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dave Clow   Click Here to Email Dave Clow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mjanovec:
That's debatable. Everyone knew (even the Mercury 7) that being an astronaut would be one of the most high profile jobs in the country, with the rewards that came with that level of fame.
They knew it was at least as likely that they'd be killed as it was that they'd be sitting at a table signing for guys like me 50 years later. In fact they knew the former was much more likely.

If any of them had let it slip to Kraft or Slayton that their driving motives were fame and money they'd have lost he respect of their colleagues and probably been shown the door. And no one imagined the fame and media attention at the level they are now.

mjanovec
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posted 04-09-2012 12:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dave Clow:
And no one imagined the fame and media attention at the level they are now.

Their fame today is a mere shadow of what it was in the 60s. They didn't have to seek out fame while they were astronauts. The simple act of becoming an astronaut made them famous...and they knew it. I don't disagree that they undertook a very dangerous job. Indeed, the danger was a big reason they were famous to begin with.

By today's standards, none of them are really famous anymore (beyond the space enthusiast community) except for Armstrong (for obvious reasons), Glenn, and Aldrin. Aldrin has maintained a certain level of fame because he has worked to maintain that fame as much as possible.

For the record, I have no problem with the astronauts charging for autographs...and they are free to charge what they like. I do find completion fees to be somewhat distasteful, but that's just a personal opinion.

garymilgrom
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posted 04-09-2012 12:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In response to the original question, when I met Buzz at an ASF event he was very open and accomodating, talking about his personal life as well as Apollo and the specifics of orbital rendezvous.

At an outdoor event (airshow) where autographs were not permitted he maintained his friendly demeanor, calling other astronauts together for a group portrait and posing several times as we in attendance futzed with our cameras. Overall a very positive experience.

ASF Portrait

Dave Clow
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posted 04-10-2012 11:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dave Clow   Click Here to Email Dave Clow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mjanovec:
Their fame today is a mere shadow of what it was in the 60s.
I'll risk that I might be taking your remark out of context here instead of reposting all of it, simply to say that the "fame and media attention" I mentioned were, in the 60's, nothing like what they are now.

The scale of it, the money, the unrelenting attention today are all orders of magnitude greater than what they were. For the collectors like us that's good news: we have readier access to our Aldrins and our other heroes than ever; for the Aldrins, though, that's a mixed blessing because our access often comes whether they like it or not.

It's reached a level the astronauts couldn't have anticipated. In their day the Time-Life deal was an astounding perq that gave them fame with a measure of control. That's long since past. There may be fewer people who understand them today than there were before, but that doesn't keep ravenous media and intrusive enthusiasts from invading their lives anyway. I'm guessing that Neil Armstrong used to be able to get a haircut without having to ask the barber not to sell his hair. Buzz surely has a few dozen versions of that story to tell. Mike Mullane's terrific book talks about the time he was a passenger on a Southwest flight piloted by Hoot Gibson. In one of the best "gotchas" ever pulled, Gibson came on the PA system to tell passengers that real astronaut was sitting in seat so-and-so. Mullane must have been wishing for a parachute.

By and large I'm proud to be part of this collecting community (kudos to the mentors like Robert, Al Hallonquist, et al.) because generally we take the trouble to understand what these men and women did, and generally we're respectful of their lives and privacy. I'd be curious to know, however, how many of them ever expected to be attending events like ours in 2012 — or that there would even BE events like ours at all — when they were training for flights back in 1966.

mjanovec
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posted 04-11-2012 12:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dave Clow:
It's reached a level the astronauts couldn't have anticipated. In their day the Time-Life deal was an astounding perq that gave them fame with a measure of control. That's long since past. There may be fewer people who understand them today than there were before, but that doesn't keep ravenous media and intrusive enthusiasts from invading their lives anyway.
With all due respect, I must disagree here. These men were MUCH more famous and well known back in the 1960s. Most of them are now only "famous" in the minds of a select group of space enthusiasts. It might be easy to forget, but we are a distinct minority. There are no ravenous media following these men around anymore. Yes, there are intrusive enthusiasts who bother them from time to time, but it has likely been that way for several decades.

It was interesting to attend the first ASF autograph show back in 2008. I sat in the courtyard at the KSC Visitor's Center (away from the autograph show) and watched as Ed Mitchell walked through the busy courtyard (where the food vendors are) on his way towards the Debus Center. These people in the courtyard weren't there for the autograph show... they were just regular visitors to KSC. With so many people surrounding him, how many of these people actually noticed a moonwalker in their midst? From all appearances, nobody recognized him. A few minutes later, Scott Carpenter made the same trek through the crowd... even wearing a Mercury 7 hat. Again, nobody appeared to even notice. I honestly believe Neil Armstrong could have made the same walk without attracting any attention.

Fast forward to early 2011, when I attended a field trip through JSC led by Harrison Schmitt. Schmitt walked freely through Space Center Houston, full of visitors and tourists, and didn't appear to be recognized by anyone who wasn't a member of our field trip. Even when he talked in front of the Command Module about his voyage, nobody walking by really appeared to register that this was a genuine moonwalker in their midst. And if they figured it out, nobody seemed to care.

To me, these incidents were a clear indication that these men are not that famous anymore, in the accepted sense of the term. Yes, they are famous among cS'ers and other avid space fans. But most of them can hardly get recognized... even at the nation's two greatest space tourist attractions.

Buel
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posted 04-15-2012 03:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Buel   Click Here to Email Buel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A good friend of mine wants to come to Autographica and ask Buzz Aldrin to sign his arm so he can get it tattooed. He is willing to pay the 3D price that Buzz will undoubtedly ask (unless he raises it three times whilst we are there...joke!) ...but do you think Buzz would actually do this?

Dave Clow
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posted 04-15-2012 01:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dave Clow   Click Here to Email Dave Clow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mjanovec:
Schmitt walked freely through Space Center Houston, full of visitors and tourists, and didn't appear to be recognized by anyone who wasn't a member of our field trip.
I've had the same experience at Kennedy Space Center, marveling at watching Jim Lovell walk unnoticed through the courtyard and the Rocket Garden past oblivious tourists.

I wouldn't call that indicative; lucky, perhaps, and hopefully more the rule than the exception, but still...

I'd love it if all the space "fans" were respectful of the astronauts, but you and I could likely compare notes on seeing a few enthusiasts fasten themselves like ticks onto these people and not let go. You don't have to be "that" famous for fame to be burdensome and irritating. There's a post here today about someone who wants Buzz Aldrin to sign his arm — how's that going to make a moonwalker feel?

It makes you wonder why those like Young, Mattingly and Anders don't get near these events. Then again, maybe it's obvious why they don't.

Buel
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posted 04-15-2012 01:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Buel   Click Here to Email Buel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I wouldn't say that my friend's wish is THAT crazy? A bit silly maybe...

SpaceSteve
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posted 04-15-2012 10:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceSteve   Click Here to Email SpaceSteve     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Buel:
I wouldn't say that my friend's wish is THAT crazy? A bit silly maybe...

It's certainly more tame than cases I've read of where professional athletes have been asked to, and they've complied, in signing certain parts of the female anatomy (bust and butt).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-15-2012 10:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Buel:
A good friend of mine wants to come to Autographica and ask Buzz Aldrin to sign his arm so he can get it tattooed.
All I know about tattoos (which isn't much) I've learned from watching ink-themed reality shows, but shouldn't a body artist be able to translate the signature from a piece of paper onto your friend's arm, rather than needing Aldrin to sign the arm itself?

Mike Dixon
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posted 04-16-2012 01:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Dixon   Click Here to Email Mike Dixon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Buel:
I wouldn't say that my friend's wish is THAT crazy? A bit silly maybe...

Well, there's no resale value ...

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 04-16-2012 05:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Buel:
He is willing to pay the 3D price that Buzz will undoubtedly ask (unless he raises it three times whilst we are there...joke!)
Actually, Buzz' price to do so... will cost your friend an arm and a leg.

steelhead fly fishing
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posted 04-16-2012 08:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for steelhead fly fishing   Click Here to Email steelhead fly fishing     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The person wishing to have his arm autographed by Buzz to then have the autograph tattooed, needs to closely look at any existing tattoos he may have. If he has the names Neil, James, or Michael on his body, he could be charged a completion fee!

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 04-16-2012 09:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
But... if Mike Collins or Neil Armstrong COULD sign your body... then you'd be charged a completion fee.

Buel
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posted 04-16-2012 12:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Buel   Click Here to Email Buel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ah, but what if he has the name Bart Sibrel already on his arm AND asks Buzz to sign it as 'Edwin Eugene Aldrin'?

fredtrav
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posted 04-16-2012 01:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fredtrav   Click Here to Email fredtrav     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well I have a copy of the Philmus book "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Moon" signed by Buzz. Not Edwin Eugene though. Maybe I should get that signed by Sibrel. I wonder if he charges a completion fee.

Buel
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Posts: 175
From: UK
Registered: Mar 2012

posted 04-16-2012 04:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Buel   Click Here to Email Buel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I believe that if Sibrel sees Buzz's signature on anything first he does indeed charge a completion fee but also insists on punching the recipient in the face whilst screaming 'HAVE IT BACK ALDRIN'. Very odd chap.


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