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  [Discuss] NASA's Artemis I mission (Orion) (Page 6)

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] NASA's Artemis I mission (Orion)
JBoe
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posted 09-03-2022 04:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JBoe   Click Here to Email JBoe     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I know that the other concern was running up to SpaceX Crew 5 launch, but could they launch both vehicles the same day depending on launch window and safety parameters?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-03-2022 04:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not likely; tanking activities for either vehicle would require the work on the other pad to stand down. The Eastern Range also needs time between launches to reset.

SpaceAngel
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posted 09-06-2022 11:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How long before we hear any updates from NASA officials of a game plan to get Artemis/SLS off the ground?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-06-2022 12:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As soon as they are ready to say what the next steps are. This is the first day back for the team.

At last word, NASA is still deciding if the repair work will be done at the pad or the if the SLS will roll back to the Vehicle Assembly Building.

SpaceAngel
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posted 09-07-2022 02:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good afternoon; I just heard that KSC technicians will repair the leaky hydrogen connector at the pad, instead of rolling the launch vehicle back to the VAB.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-07-2022 02:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not instead, but at first; NASA's plan as of now is to first repair and test the quick disconnect at the pad and then roll back the SLS to the Vehicle Assembly Building to service its flight termination system batteries.

The only way NASA can avoid a rollback is to receive a waiver from the Eastern Range, but as of today that has not happened.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-07-2022 04:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA will host a media teleconference on Thursday (Sept. 8) at 11 a.m. EDT to discuss the next steps for the Artemis I mission.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-08-2022 10:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA has requested Sept. 23 and Sept. 27 as potential launch dates, pending receiving a waiver from the Eastern Range to avoid needing to roll back to the Vehicle Assembly Building to retest the flight termination system batteries.

A launch on Sept. 23 would be during a 120-minute window opening at 6:47 a.m. EDT (1047 GMT), 24 minutes before sunrise, and result in a 25-day mission, landing on Oct. 18. A launch on Sept. 27 would be during a 70-minute window opening at 11:37 a.m. EDT (1537 GMT) and result in a 39-day mission, landing on Nov. 5.

The two dates avoid conflicting with the DART mission's use of the Deep Space Network on Sept. 26.

Engineers are moving forward with replacing the seals on both the 8-inch and 4-inch quick disconnects that are suspected to be the source of the hydrogen leak during the second launch attempt. After the work is completed, NASA plans to conduct a cryo test on or about Sept. 17, filling both the core stage and upper stage with liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen.

GACspaceguy
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posted 09-08-2022 10:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Interesting dates, from a NASA published chart the 23rd would be a short mission and the 27th a long mission. Do I have that correct?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-08-2022 10:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was updating while you were posting, but yes, 25 and 39 days, respectively.

Neil Aldrin
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posted 09-08-2022 11:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Neil Aldrin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What is the reasoning behind not being able to service the flight termination batteries at the pad, and what actually has to been done to get to them once inside the VAB?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-08-2022 12:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From what I understand, the batteries are located in the core stage such that access to them requires the work platforms in the VAB.

The batteries need to be tested to ensure they are still holding a sufficient charge to power the flight termination system. They do not need to be replaced (the expiration date for replacement is far enough into the future to not be a concern at this time).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-12-2022 06:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
New target dates:
  • No earlier than Wednesday, Sept. 21: Cryogenic tanking test

  • Sept 27: 70-minute launch window opens at 11:37 a.m. EDT; landing Nov. 5

  • Oct. 2 (under review): 109-minute launch window opens at 2:52 p.m.; landing on Nov. 11
NASA is continuing to respect the Eastern Range's process for review of the agency’s request for an extension of the current testing requirement for the flight termination system and is providing additional information and data as needed. In parallel, the agency is continuing preparations for the cryogenic demonstration test and potential launch opportunities, should the request be approved.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-21-2022 12:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA video
From NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, live coverage with commentary as teams add supercold fuel to our Space Launch System rocket in a cryogenic demonstration test, scheduled to begin at 7:15 a.m. EDT (11:15 UTC).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-21-2022 09:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A hydrogen leak matching the same type seen during the second launch attempt has been detected, resulting in propellant loading being halted.

Engineers are letting the quick disconnect warm up in an attempt to reseat the hardware and stop the leak.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-21-2022 11:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Teams resumed the flow of liquid hydrogen after warming up the quick disconnect and though a leak was still detected, by keeping a reduced pressure it was smaller (less than one percent) than before.

Fast fill of the core stage continued and then an engine bleed test was conducted, feeding liquid hydrogen to the four RS-25 engines to bring their temperature down to the conditions required for launch. The leak briefly increased when a vent valve was closed, but remained below limits.

Liquid hydrogen loading onto the core stage has now passed 50 percent. Liquid oxygen is now fully loaded into the core stage.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-21-2022 12:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Core stage liquid hydrogen fast fill has been completed and is now in replenish. The hydrogen leak is holding at 0.5 percent.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-21-2022 02:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Launch controllers have reached the replenish phase for both the liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen loading operations for the interim cryogenic propulsion stage. Teams are now moving into operations to conduct a pre-pressurization test, in which engineers will bring the core stage liquid hydrogen tank up to the pressure level it will experience just before launch while engineers calibrate the settings for conditioning the engines at a higher flow rate, as will be done during the terminal count on launch day.

The pre-pressurization test is expected to last about an hour.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-21-2022 03:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The pre-pressurization test is complete and went well, though the hydrogen leak from the 4" quick disconnect engine bleed line increased to a little over 5 percent in the cavity during the maximum pressure on the system. As the flow continued, the leak rate lowered on its own.

Had this been a launch attempt, this leak would have been a violation and stopped the countdown.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-21-2022 04:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The test is now complete. Launch director Charlie Blackwell-Thompson addressed what are the chances for a launch on Sept. 27:
I think we'll take the data and we'll go see what it tells us.

I am extremely encouraged by the test today, getting through all the objectives. We're setting up in our scrub turnaround to begin replenishment ops in preparation for our launch day.

Like I said, we'll go take a look at the data. I don't like to get ahead of the data. I'd like the team to have the opportunity to go look at it to see if there are changes we need to make to our loading procedures, our timelines or if we are good as is, but I'd like the team to have an opportunity to look at that before I speculate.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-23-2022 11:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA is pressing forward with preparations for a launch attempt on Tuesday, Sept. 27, but are watching the weather closely given Tropical Depression Nine and will likely make a call whether they need to roll back to the Vehicle Assembly Building to take shelter within the next 24 hours.

The 45th Weather Squadron calls for a 20 percent chance of favorable conditions at the time of launch on Tuesday.

SpaceAngel
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posted 09-23-2022 12:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would not attempt to launch on 9/27, with a 20% chance of favorable weather...

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-23-2022 01:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Don't get hung up on the percentage; the shuttle launched on more than one mission when the prediction was only a 10 percent chance of favorable conditions.

The pressing concern is the predicted track of the storm and how strong it will be when it reaches the Cape.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-24-2022 10:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA has deferred making a final decision about whether to roll back to Sunday (Sept. 25) to allow for additional data gathering and analysis. If managers elect to roll back, it would begin late Sunday night or early Monday morning.

A new launch date will be decided after a decision is made whether to roll or after the vehicle is back in the Vehicle Assembly Building.

Headshot
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posted 09-24-2022 11:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If Artemis I is rolled back to the VAB, will NASA take the opportunity to replace the SLS Flight Terminations System batteries?

oly
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posted 09-24-2022 10:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The batteries don't necessarily need to be replaced, they may just need to be inspected, serviced, and re-certified. It is my understanding that they were initially certified for a specific period of time, and that time has expired.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-24-2022 11:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, NASA has said if they roll back for the storm, then they will service the batteries before returning to the pad. Earlier, managers said it would take two to three weeks to complete that work.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-25-2022 10:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The latest information provided by NOAA, the U.S. Space Force and the National Hurricane Center indicates a slower moving and potentially more westerly track of the storm than yesterday's predictions showed, providing more time for NASA's decision making process.

NASA managers will meet this evening to evaluate whether to roll back or remain at the launch pad to preserve an opportunity for a launch attempt on Oct. 2. The exact time of a potential rollback will depend on future weather predictions throughout the day and could occur Monday or very early Tuesday morning.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-25-2022 08:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA managers met Sunday evening (Sept. 25) to review the latest weather forecast and decided to meet again Monday to allow for additional data gathering overnight before making the decision whether to roll back.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-26-2022 11:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA has decided to roll back the Artemis I rocket back to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to take shelter from the approaching storm. First motion is targeted for 11 p.m. EDT on Monday (Sept. 26).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-27-2022 12:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Kennedy Space Center (via Twitter):
At 11:21 p.m. EDT [on Monday, Sept. 26], NASA’s Artemis I moon rocket left launch pad 39B atop the crawler-transporter and began its 4-mile trek to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB).

At approximately 9:15 a.m. EDT [on Tuesday, Sept. 27], the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for the Artemis I mission were secured inside the Vehicle Assembly Building ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Ian.

At approximately 11:45 a.m. today, a fire was reported in the Vehicle Assembly Building. Employees were evacuated, and there are no reported injuries. The VAB is fire safe, and the Artemis I vehicle was not at risk.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-30-2022 04:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA has determined it will focus Artemis I launch planning efforts on the launch period that opens Nov. 12 and closes Nov. 27.

Over the coming days, managers will assess the scope of work to perform while in the VAB and identify a specific date for the next launch attempt.

SpaceAngel
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posted 10-01-2022 10:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Why can't NASA make an effort to launch Artemis/SLS this month?

Robert Pearlman
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NASA engineers have a list of about 20 limited life items that they have to inspect, if not also service or replace, on the vehicle, before they can certify the SLS and Orion are safe to roll back out to the pad and an attempt a launch.

As Jim Free, NASA's associate administrator for exploration systems, said, "We don't want to go out too fast and then get stuck in a situation where maybe we didn't get to all the limited life items we wanted to look at because we're trying to get back out there."

SpaceAngel
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posted 10-09-2022 11:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When will management and engineers make the decision of rolling the SLS back to Pad-39B?

Robert Pearlman
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As of Oct. 6, NASA teams were still performing checkouts of the SLS and Orion.
While teams inside the Vehicle Assemble Building complete check-outs, managers are coordinating with the U.S. Space Force to reserve launch dates on the Eastern Range and working with other parts of the agency to evaluate any potential constraints before NASA sets a target date for the next launch attempt.

Blackarrow
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posted 10-09-2022 05:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How much of a risk is there that the multiple journeys taken by SLS between the VAB and Pad 39B will cause vibration-induced hidden damage?

We know that the core stage made a successful full-duration firing of the four main engines, but since that firing there have been those multiple journeys on the Crawler. If any micro-cracks have developed in welds in the engines, or elsewhere, are any checks currently being made in the VAB to identify such damage?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-09-2022 07:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Engineers and technicians inspect the vehicle for damage after each rollout or rollback. That is the part work being done in the VAB now and will be repeated once the SLS is back on the launch pad (without platform access, engineering cameras are used to scan the core stage).

NASA did assess the vehicle for how many rolls could be done without increasing risk. Prior to rolling back for the hurricane, the agency said they still had a margin of two rolls before it became a concern.

Blackarrow
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posted 10-09-2022 09:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Robert, when you refer to checks "after each rollout or rollback" may we take it that "two rolls" means (1) the recent hurricane-related rollback; and (2) the coming rollout aimed at a November launch? That would suggest that once SLS is back on the pad, it must be launched, or there will be a risk from future rollback damage.

That might raise the old issue of "Go Fever."

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-09-2022 11:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It means that if the vehicle needs to be rolled back again, there may be additional inspections or tests before NASA proceeds with another launch attempt.


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