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  Exploration: Asteroids, Moon and Mars
  [Discuss] NASA's Artemis I mission (Orion) (Page 2)

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] NASA's Artemis I mission (Orion)
Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-13-2020 12:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Artemis 1 mission plan, as it exists today, from the NASA Advisory Committee Human Exploration and Operations (HEO) meeting on Wednesday (May 13).

Robert Pearlman
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NASA photo release
The two solid rocket boosters that will power NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) for Artemis missions to the Moon are on their way to the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida after departing from a Northrop Grumman manufacturing facility in Promontory, Utah, on June 5, 2020.

The boosters – each comprised of five motor segments – are scheduled to arrive at Kennedy’s Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility, where teams with NASA’s Exploration Ground Systems will process the segments before moving them to the Vehicle Assembly Building for stacking on the mobile launcher.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-27-2020 12:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
An update on the Artemis-1 readiness from Kathy Lueders, NASA's head of human exploration and operations:
Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, NASA also completed a detailed cost and schedule assessment for Artemis I and established a new agency commitment for launch readiness by November 2021. While it is too early to predict the full impact of COVID-19, we are confident a November 2021 date is achievable with the recent pace of progress, and a successful Green Run hot fire test will enable us to better predict a target launch date for the mission.

Taking this new launch readiness date into account, NASA also aligned the development costs for the SLS and Exploration Ground Systems programs through Artemis I and established new cost commitments. The new development baseline cost for SLS is $9.1 billion, and the commitment for the initial ground systems capability to support the mission is now $2.4 billion. NASA’s cost and schedule commitment for Orion currently remains within original targets and is tied to demonstrating the capability to fly crew on the Artemis II mission by 2023.

NASA has notified Congress of these new commitments, and we are working at the best possible pace toward launch, including streamlining operational flow at Kennedy and assessing opportunities to further improve the efficiency of our integration activities. Now that the majority of the design development is done, as well as the first time build and an extensive test program, a lot of effort is behind us.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-30-2020 11:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The discovery of a failed redundant channel in one of the eight power and data units (PDU) on the Artemis 1 Orion's crew module adapter may result in a time-consuming removal and replacement, according to Loren Grush reporting for The Verge.
To get to the PDU, Lockheed Martin could remove the Orion crew capsule from its service module, but it’s a lengthy process that could take up to a year. As many as nine months would be needed to take the vehicle apart and put it back together again, in addition to three months for subsequent testing, according to the presentation.

Lockheed has another option, but it’s never been done before and may carry extra risks, Lockheed Martin engineers acknowledge in their presentation. To do it, engineers would have to tunnel through the adapter’s exterior by removing some of the outer panels of the adapter to get to the PDU. The panels weren’t designed to be removed this way, but this scenario may only take up to four months to complete if engineers figure out a way to do it.

A third option is that Lockheed Martin and NASA could fly the Orion capsule as is. The PDU failed in such a way that it lost redundancy within the unit, so it can still function. But at a risk-averse agency like NASA, flying a vehicle without a backup plan is not exactly an attractive option.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-17-2020 08:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA has decided to fly with the PDU as is:
During their troubleshooting, engineers evaluated the option to "use as is" with the high-degree of available redundancy or remove and replace the box.

They determined that due to the limited accessibility to this particular box, the degree of intrusiveness to the overall spacecraft systems, and other factors, the risk of collateral damage outweighed the risk associated with the loss of one leg of redundancy in a highly redundant system. Therefore, NASA has made the decision to proceed with vehicle processing.

Headshot
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posted 12-17-2020 10:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I guess I have to ask the question, "Would NASA fly Orion in this condition if it were a manned mission?"

Any thoughts?

Blackarrow
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posted 12-19-2020 11:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There's a rather fundamental difference between "loss of vehicle" and "loss of vehicle and crew." The vehicle is replaceable, the crew is not.

It also occurs to me that in what seems to be the unlikely event of a fault developing, there would be useful engineering lessons to be learned from observing how well the built-in redundancies operate (and if they do not operate properly, other lessons will be learned!).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-29-2021 06:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boeing video
Ready to rocket! See the enormous NASA Space Launch System Core Stage 1 offload at NASA Kennedy and move to the iconic NASA Vehicle Assembly Building. The 212-foot Core Stage 1 is the backbone of the rocket for the Artemis​ I mission.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-10-2021 07:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Kennedy Space Center (via Twitter):
The lift has begun.

The Space Launch System's core stage has been lifted out of its stand! It will soon be raised to a vertical position and placed on the mobile launcher in between the two solid rocket boosters.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-11-2021 02:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Kennedy Space Center (via Twitter):
Things are looking up around here!

Teams have rotated the Space Launch System core stage — the largest part of the rocket — into a vertical position. Soon, they will lift up the core stage and lower it down into High Bay 3 to join the twin solid rocket boosters on the mobile launcher.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-12-2021 12:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Kennedy Space Center (via Twitter):
Teams successfully lowered the Space Launch System core stage down onto the mobile launcher in between the already assembled twin solid rocket boosters.

Weighing more than 188,000 pounds without fuel and standing 212 feet, the core stage is the largest element of the SLS rocket.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-14-2021 05:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA video
The Space Launch System rocket core stage for the first Artemis mission was lifted and stacked in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. The core stage was placed in between the already stacked twin solid rocket boosters on the mobile launcher.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-06-2021 09:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Kennedy Space Center (via Twitter):
The Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS) has been lowered into place on the Space Launch System rocket!

Once in orbit, the ICPS and its single RL-10 engine will provide nearly 25,000 pounds of thrust to send the Orion spacecraft on a precise trajectory to the moon.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-01-2021 10:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The earliest that the Artemis 1 Space Launch System is expected to roll out to the launch pad is in late November, officials told Spaceflight Now, leaving little time to conduct a fueling test, roll the rocket back into the Vehicle Assembly Building for final closeouts and then return to the pad for a launch before the end of the year.
NASA engineers have not discovered any major problems during the SLS testing, but key milestones leading up to the Artemis 1 launch have been steadily sliding to the right in NASA's processing schedule.

Before NASA raised the Boeing-made SLS core stage onto its mobile launch platform inside High Bay 3 of the VAB in June, managers hoped to connect he Orion spacecraft for the Artemis 1 mission on top of the rocket in August. That's now expected this fall.

The first rollout of the 322-foot-tall (98-meter) rocket from the VAB to launch pad 39B was scheduled no earlier than September. That's now expected in late November, at the soonest, according to [senior vehicle operations manager for NASA's exploration ground systems program, Cliff] Lanham.

The schedule slips, while not significant amid the history of SLS program delays, have put a major crunch on NASA's ambition to launch the Artemis 1 mission this year. The agency is evaluating Artemis 1 launch opportunities in the second half of December, multiple sources said, but that would require NASA to cut in half the time it originally allotted between the SLS fueling test and the actual launch date.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-22-2021 09:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Exploration Ground Systems video (via Twitter):
On Sunday, Sept. 19th, teams with Exploration Ground Systems and Jacobs successfully completed the Umbilical Release and Retract Test (URRT) with the mobile launcher and the Space Launch System inside of High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-18-2021 02:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Kennedy Space Center live video
Watch live as the Orion spacecraft for the Artemis I mission rolls from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Abort System Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building ahead of stacking atop the already assembled Space Launch System rocket.

The move will take place overnight (EDT) October 18th into the 19th.

Please be advised, after the spacecraft departs the LASF and ahead of approaching the VAB the feed will be stopped and started again as the spacecraft approaches the VAB doors.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-20-2021 09:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA's Exploration Ground Systems update (via Twitter):
The final "Up & Over" as Orion and its Launch Abort System are lifted out of High Bay 4 in the Vehicle Assembly Building and lowered down into High Bay 3 to join the Space Launch System just past midnight [EDT] on the morning of Oct. 20, 2021.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-17-2021 07:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
During a recent core stage power test, engineers identified an issue with one of the RS-25 engine flight controllers.
After performing a series of inspections and troubleshooting, engineers determined the best course of action is to replace the engine controller, returning the rocket to full functionality and redundancy while continuing to investigate and identify a root cause. NASA is developing a plan and updated schedule to replace the engine controller while continuing integrated testing and reviewing launch opportunities in March and April.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-18-2022 09:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Per today's meeting of the NASA Advisory Council's Human Exploration and Operations Committee, the launch of Artemis I is currently planned for the end of the March window, which closes on March 27.

The April window, if needed, opens on April 8.

Rollout of the vehicle to Pad 39B is targeted for Feb. 15 for a wet dress rehearsal, with a launch to follow 6 to 7 days before the end of the March window.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-02-2022 08:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Rollout update:
The agency will roll the combined Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft out of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Launch Pad 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for testing no earlier than March 2022.

While the teams are not working any major issues, NASA has added additional time to complete closeout activities inside the VAB prior to rolling the rocket out for the first time.

Engineers are conducting final integrated tests of Orion and SLS along with the ground equipment, prior to rolling the rocket and spacecraft to the launch pad for a final test, known as the wet dress rehearsal. This final test will run the rocket and launch team through operations to load propellant into the fuel tanks and conduct a full launch countdown.

Following a successful rehearsal, NASA will roll the stack back into the VAB for final checks and set a target date for launch.

p51
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posted 02-02-2022 01:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for p51   Click Here to Email p51     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The two solid rocket boosters that will power NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) for Artemis missions to the Moon are on their way...
I do wonder how they get them to the railhead. I assume by truck? Do they load them on at Ogden's freight yard?

There are no railroad tracks going that far, which is ironic when you consider that facility is within sight of the where the golden spike was driven (which though symbolically completing the transcontinental railroad in 1869, it didn't in fact as there were still two gaps at the time, but that's another subject).

The rails through there were yanked out during WW2 in favor of a nearby route that now crosses the Great Salt Lake.

There is an ancient freight siding that heads toward the area but stops well short of the facility (and those rails aren't in great shape anyway).

SkyMan1958
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posted 02-02-2022 04:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I thought the two solid rocket boosters were already stacked, after all, isn't that what fully stacked means? I had heard tell that once the solid boosters are"stacked" they have a "must use by" date. Is that the case, and if so, when are the currently stacked solid rocket boosters supposed to "time out"? Thank you!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-24-2022 02:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The solid rocket boosters for Artemis I were fully stacked in March 2021, but the one-year certification for the joints between the segments began on Jan. 7 when the first elements were mated. That 12-month limit though, was extended with an engineering review and the stack continues to be good to fly through at least this summer.
quote:
Originally posted by p51:
I do wonder how they get them to the railhead. I assume by truck? Do they load them on at Ogden's freight yard?
The solid rocket motor segments are transported from Northrop Grumman's Utah test facility by truck the short distance to the company's loadout building in Corinne, where they are then transferred to rail cars for the trip to Florida.

Robert Pearlman
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The rollout of the Space Launch System to the launch pad for the wet dress rehearsal is currently planned to begin at 6 p.m. EDT on March 17. It will take about an hour for the vehicle to exit the Vehicle Assembly Building and then 11 hours to be hard down on Launch Pad 39B.

The vehicle will spend about a month out at the pad (including a brief pause in work while SpaceX launches the Axiom 1 crew from Pad 39A) and then will return to the VAB for final preparations for launch.

A launch date will be determined after the results of the wet dress rehearsal are known. At present, the earliest Artemis I can launch is the end of the May window, which closes on May 21. The next window extends from June 6 to 16 (and then June 29 to July 12, excluding July 2 to 4).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-02-2022 07:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA is now inviting members of the public to send your name on Artemis I:
Add your name here to have it included on a flash drive that will fly aboard Artemis I.

Jim Behling
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posted 03-07-2022 10:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by p51:
Do they load them on at Ogden's freight yard?
This is the yard near Corrine where they are loaded onto trains. The plant is 20 or so miles west on SR83 and not really in Ogden.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-16-2022 12:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Kennedy Space Center update (via Twitter):
Platform retraction: COMPLETE.

All of the platforms surrounding the Space Launch System and Orion have been retracted in preparation for rollout. On March 17, the Artemis I stack will begin the journey to Launch Complex 39B ahead of the wet dress rehearsal test.

SkyMan1958
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posted 03-16-2022 06:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just for interests sakes, does anyone know if the wet dress rehearsal is included in the $4.1 billion price tag of the launch of one SLS, or is that a separate cost that needs to be added on?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-16-2022 07:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I believe the WDR is included in that figure.

One thing to keep in mind though, the $4.1 billion price tag was determined by OIG based on its own assessment; it was not based on NASA's actual expenditures.

The true full cost of an SLS won't be known until multiple SLS launches have occurred, just as it was the case with Saturn V and the space shuttle. It takes time to figure out efficiencies in production, as well as discover costs that were unexpected (such as the extent to which the shuttle orbiters had to be dissembled and rebuilt between flights).

Tom
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posted 03-17-2022 10:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Question... is there a reason why both versions of the NASA insignia (meatball and worm) were painted on Artemis 1?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-17-2022 11:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The decision to add the "worm" appeared to be in reaction to a groundswell of public support for the resurrection of the retired logotype. NASA wanted to capture that interest and extend it to the Artemis program.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-17-2022 11:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA live video
Watch as the rocket and spacecraft for our Artemis I mission around the Moon move to their launchpad at Kennedy Space Center.

Jurg Bolli
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posted 03-18-2022 04:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jurg Bolli   Click Here to Email Jurg Bolli     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
Rocket rollout: How NASA's first Artemis Space Launch System move stacks up against Saturn V
Fascinating comparison, I wish I could see this in person!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-19-2022 10:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA photo release (credit: Keegan Barber)
From left to right, NASA Associate Administrator Bob Cabana, Reid Wiseman, Chief of the Astronaut Office, Apollo Astronaut Tom Stafford, NASA Administrator Bill Nelson, and NASA Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy pose for a photo as the agency's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard rolls out of High Bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building for the first time, Thursday, March 17, 2022, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Headshot
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posted 03-19-2022 03:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for posting that picture Robert. I am so glad one of the Apollo astronauts got to see the Artemis rollout up close and personal. Do you know if any others were there?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-19-2022 05:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I saw a few other astronauts at the press site (Victor Glover, Randy Bresnik and Jeremy Hansen) but no one else from the Apollo era.

The SLS will be on the pad for the next month or so, so it is possible others may still come to see it, and then, of course, there is the launch.

Blackarrow
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posted 03-19-2022 06:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I assume Dave Scott and Charlie Duke were en route to the "Legends of Apollo" event in Switzerland (18th and 19th March), a reasonable excuse for not attending!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-21-2022 06:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Airbus (via Twitter):
The #Artemis I launch is getting closer. We just captured the SLS rocket on its launch pad with our Pléiades Neo hi-res satellite.

We can't wait to see the Orion spacecraft propelled by European-built service module in space!

Blackarrow
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posted 03-25-2022 02:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've asked this question before, but there were no takers: what happens to the cryogenic fuel and oxidizer after a "wet" test? Similarly, when a shuttle launch was scrubbed and the LH2 and LOX was de-tanked, what happened to it? Was it dumped (where?) or re-used?

oly
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posted 03-25-2022 11:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have no idea what happened during Apollo or shuttle, but NASA was tasked with reducing the cost of lost cryogenic liquids. Large quantity cryogenic liquid loss for the shuttle program cost Stennis Space Center and KSC over $20M per year between 2006 and 2009. In 2010, Kennedy Space Centre began working at the center's Cryogenics Test Laboratory on methods of developing pioneering technologies to mitigate these losses.

To support the fueling of NASA's SLS rocket, Kennedy Space Center began construction of a new liquid hydrogen storage tank at Pad 39B that utilized refrigerated techniques known as Integrated Refrigeration and Storage, or IRaS, to reduce liquid boiloff losses. This idea stemmed from the Zero-Boil-Off proposal in the early 1990's, by Ergenics Inc.

After completion of the shuttle program, the KSC Propellant Management Group performed a study of LH2 acquisition, use and loss over the life of the program. It found the agency's two largest users of liquid hydrogen, KSC and SSC, lose approximately 50% of hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into storage and transportation vessels, transient chilldown of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds to maintain interface temperature, ullage losses during venting, and operational methods. These losses were quantified and grouped into three general categories: replenish loss, storage loss, and load loss.

So for the SLS, NASA plans to recover as many gallons of cryogenic liquids as possible by using the new cryogenic IRaS system.


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