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  [Discuss] NASA's Artemis-1 mission (Orion) (Page 3)

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] NASA's Artemis-1 mission (Orion)
Blackarrow
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posted 03-26-2022 10:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by oly:
So for the SLS, NASA plans to recover as many gallons of cryogenic liquids as possible by using the new cryogenic IRaS system.
Thanks for that, at least it's a partial answer. It did occur to me that LH2 and LOX flowing through pipes, lying in tanks, then flowing back into storage would surely pick up contaminants. I assume there is some sort of filtration system to remove any such foreign matter.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-02-2022 06:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA's Exploration Ground Systems update on the WDR (via Twitter):
The launch team is continuing to monitor severe weather in the area surrounding LC-39B. This afternoon, one of the three, nearly 600-foot lightning towers was struck. The lightning protection system works together to protect the rocket from lightning strikes.

The team is currently evaluating next steps and will conduct a series of procedures to make sure no systems were impacted. NASA will provide an update once the team has assessed the intensity of the strike and established a go forward plan.

Despite what it looks like, the strike did not hit the mobile launcher.

Fun fact about our lightning system: we have instrumentation that can pinpoint the exact location and intensity of lightning strikes. No hits to the ML have occurred.

This does not disrupt the count. The launch team has begun pre-planned troubleshooting procedures and will continue to work through them as the countdown continues.

Headshot
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posted 04-02-2022 06:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Better that this happened now than during the actual Artemis 2 countdown with the crew onboard.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-02-2022 09:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA update
Engineers confirmed there were four lightning strikes to the lightning towers within the perimeter of Launch Pad 39B.

Teams have determined the first three were low intensity strikes to tower two and are continuing to review data from the fourth strike, which was higher in intensity to tower one. At the time of the strikes, Orion and the Space Launch System (SLS) core stage were powered up and the solid rocket boosters and interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) were not.

Teams currently see no constraints to proceeding with the test countdown timeline as planned and will continue procedures to power up the SLS boosters and ICPS overnight.

Overnight, engineers will also work to make up time for activities that were paused due to the severe weather. The Mission Management Team will review the schedule and data from the power ups and sensors at the pad at a 6 a.m. EDT tanking meeting before making the decision to proceed with the test.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-03-2022 10:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Exploration Ground Systems update after a unplanned two-hour hold to sync pad operations and Launch Control Center (via Twitter):
Team has been given a go for cryo loading and is now into pre ops. There are a number of automated monitors that are linked to the clock so it will get resynced over the next hour before it starts actually counting down beyond T-6 hours.

We are fortunate to have this flexibility during today's test, but would operate differently on launch day.

New targeted test T-0 is 6:10 p.m. EDT.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-03-2022 10:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Exploration Ground Systems update (via Twitter):
There is an issue with the prime and redundant supply fans for ML pressurization. Team is holding on cryo flow to troubleshoot and evaluate a path forward.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-03-2022 11:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Exploration Ground Systems update (via Twitter):
Wet dress rehearsal is scrubbed for today.

We are unable to provide positive pressure to the enclosed areas within the mobile launcher and keep out hazardous gases. Technicians are unable to safely proceed with loading without this capability. Looking at a 24 hour turnaround.

SpaceAngel
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posted 04-03-2022 04:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How disappointing; will this scrub impact the May launch?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-03-2022 06:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A one day delay to completing the WDR is not expected to affect the launch date, which is presently expected for sometime in June.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2022 09:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA update
Mission Management Team 'Go' to Proceed with Artemis I Wet Dress Rehearsal

At approximately 7:40 a.m. EDT on Monday (April 4), the mission management team chair gave the "go" to proceed with tanking the rocket for the Artemis I wet dress rehearsal test. Later in the countdown the Launch Director will give the "go" to begin the tanking process. Meteorologists with Space Launch Delta 45 said there were no weather constraints for the test.

Teams are continuing to hold the clock to resolve an outage with the vendor of gaseous nitrogen required for tanking preparations. Nitrogen is used to prepare for, and during tanking operations, to provide a non-flammable environment inside of the SLS. When the issue is resolved, the countdown clock will pick back up with T-6 hours, 40 minutes on the clock (L-7 hours, 20 minutes) remaining in the countdown, beginning with chilling down the liquid oxygen lines for the core stage.

Once propellant loading operations begin, liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) will flow into the into the rocket's core stage and interim cryogenic propulsion stage tanks and be topped off and replenished as some of cryogenic propellant boils off. The team will also conduct leak checks to ensure propellant loading is proceeding as expected.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2022 10:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA update
Artemis I WDR Countdown Resumes

The countdown for the wet dress rehearsal has resumed at 10:52 a.m. EDT and clocks have picked back up at T-6 hours, 40 minutes on the clock (L-7 hours, 20 minutes). A new planned T-0 of 6:02 p.m. has been established.

An earlier issue with an outage with the vendor of gaseous nitrogen required for tanking preparations has been resolved. Overnight, teams also resolved the issue with the malfunction of the fans used to provide positive pressure to enclosed areas in the mobile launcher and keep out hazardous gases, and they have a plan for operating the fans to prevent issues from reoccurring. The team was able to successfully bring up and run the primary fan through the night to provide confidence, and has configured the secondary fan to run at 80% capacity to support tanking operations.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2022 11:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Exploration Ground Systems update (via Twitter):
There is no substitute for testing with flight hardware vs. models. As we got into MPS chilldowns, we ran up against a temperature limit for the LOX ahead of flowing into core stage. Team is working through updating procedures and adjusting pressures based on data on console.

The countdown clock is continuing for now and the test team will assess where to resync after the team reconfigures loading procedures.

Space Cadet Carl
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posted 04-04-2022 12:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Space Cadet Carl   Click Here to Email Space Cadet Carl     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Don't know if this has been answered already, but will Artemis 1 downlink any HD television images while on its flight?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2022 12:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, NASA and Lockheed Martin have outfitted Orion with multiple interior and exterior pointed HD cameras to provide multiple views throughout the flight.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2022 01:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Exploration Ground Systems update (via Twitter):
LOX team has reworked procedures and is back into chilldown. Team is pressing and using every operation as test objective risk buy down.

Clock will be resynced later... It allows us to configure other systems on the vehicle not related to cryo per the timeline.

NASA Exploration Ground Systems update (via Twitter):
Just prior to sending liquid hydrogen (LH2) into the vehicle the team was unable to open a necessary vent valve on the 160 level of the mobile launcher. Teams are looking at options to present to the Launch Director.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2022 04:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Exploration Ground Systems update (via Twitter):
Due the vent valve issue, the launch director has called off the test for the day.

The team is preparing to offload LOX and will begin discussing how quickly the vehicle can be turned around for the next attempt. A lot of great learning and progress today.

SpaceAngel
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posted 04-04-2022 04:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't understand why this issue was not resolved from yesterday...

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2022 04:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Because this is a different issue than what halted the test yesterday.

Today the test proceeded further in the countdown. LOX loading was about 50 percent complete. LH2 loading had not yet begun because of the valve issue, which ultimately scrubbed the test for the day.

This is why you perform a wet dress rehearsal, to find any issues and address them before launch day.

GACspaceguy
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posted 04-04-2022 07:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I believe there were shuttle launches halted due to GSE failures. Good to get those behind during testing rather than launch day.

oly
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posted 04-04-2022 07:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How long did the first Countdown Demonstration Test wet dress rehearsal take for the Saturn V and also for the Shuttle?

Headshot
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posted 04-04-2022 07:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA used the non-flyable 500F test article to check out the Saturn V mobile launch platform, fuel loading procedures, mechanical fit checks etc. So I am not certain if there ever was an actual Wet Dress Rehearsal with an actual Saturn V.

I do know that there was something like a WDR for the Space Shuttle because I remember an unmanned engine firing test of Columbia (they did not ignite the solid rockets) on the launch pad, but do not recall any details.

Ken Havekotte
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posted 04-04-2022 08:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Three times between Sept. 27 and Oct. 13, 1967, the CDDT for the first Saturn V (AS-501) was halted by a succession of annoying problems, however, such problems had been anticipated with a new vehicle, new GSE, and a new launch team.

The problems included cables, fuel cells, a compressor, computers, stage batteries, a helium regulator, a probe measuring the fill rate of LOX, and broken sump baffles in the S-II stage. Baffle plates had to be removed and replaced.

The 104-hour countdown began Oct. 30th with two pre-planned holds and another lasting two hours needed to check out the range safety command system.

It was just 27 days after the CDDT wet run that Apollo 4 lifted off Pad 39A precisely on time at 7 am, Nov. 9, 1967.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2022 08:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As Ken noted, the Apollo 4 (SA-501) test took 17 days to complete. It was originally planned to last six days.

Prior to STS-1, NASA conducted both a wet CDDT and a dry CDDT with the crew taking part in the latter. The wet CDDT revealed a number of problems and potential problems, which were addressed before launch. The dry CDT tragically ended with the death of two technicians.

Paul78zephyr
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posted 04-05-2022 06:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul78zephyr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I did not know (or at least I dont remember) about those deaths during the dry CDDT. What a tragedy. The article's reference to the similarities to the circumstances of the Apollo 1 tragedy makes it that much worse. Also the article has a typo and gets one of the deceased individual's name wrong.

oly
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posted 04-05-2022 07:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you for the reference material. Interesting reading. I was curious how the first CDT and wet rehearsals compare for each system and how the SLS “stacks up” against them.

SpaceDust
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posted 04-06-2022 09:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceDust     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
...with multiple interior and exterior pointed HD cameras
Robert, will these camera views be accessible by the general public 24/7 like the ISS HD Earth Viewing Experiment camera is?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-06-2022 11:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA has not yet said, but not likely 24/7 given communication dropouts and bandwidth needs.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-09-2022 08:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
Artemis I Wet Dress Rehearsal Update

NASA is planning to proceed with a modified wet dress rehearsal, primarily focused on tanking the core stage, and minimal propellant operations on the interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) with the ground systems at Kennedy. Due to the changes in loading procedures required for the modified test, wet dress rehearsal testing is slated to resume with call to stations on Tuesday, April 12 and tanking on Thursday, April 14. Wet dress rehearsal is an opportunity to refine the countdown procedures and validate critical models and software interfaces. The modified test will enable engineers to achieve the test objectives critical to launch success.

Engineers have identified a helium check valve that is not functioning as expected, requiring these changes to ensure safety of the flight hardware. Helium is used for several different operations, including purging the engine, or clearing the lines, prior to loading propellants during tanking, as well as draining propellant. A check valve is a type of valve that allows liquid or gas to flow in a particular direction and prevents backflow. The helium check valve is about three inches long and prevents the helium from flowing back out of the rocket.

Following the modified test, the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft will return to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) where engineers will evaluate the valve and replace if needed. Teams are confident in the ability to replace the valve once back in the VAB.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-14-2022 03:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA's second attempt at completing a (modified) wet dress rehearsal has been halted due to a liquid hydrogen (LH2) leak. From NASA Exploration Ground Systems (via Twitter):
During an attempt to transition to fast fill for core stage hydrogen a leak was identified in the tail service mast umbilical. Teams have paused LH2 and the rocket is currently in a safe configuration.

Under the unique operating conditions with the rocket we are prepared and know leaks are a realistic possibility. We have amazing hazardous gas and leak detection systems that keep the rocket safe and alert us to conditions outside of normal parameters.

Hydrogen is extremely hazardous, cold, and a small molecule that is known for leaking. All of these systems have been sealed, leak checked and tested to the highest extent possible prior to wet dress rehearsal.

The launch director has given approval for the team to proceed with operations to chilldown the ICPS LH2 lines to collect additional data. Engineers do not plan to load LH2 or LOX into the ICPS tanks.

The team will keep the core stage LH2 tank at about 5% and the core stage LOX loading will remain stopped. The team will not conduct the terminal countdown activities today as planned and will assess next steps after today's operations.

SpaceAngel
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posted 04-15-2022 07:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When will NASA get things right?!

GACspaceguy
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posted 04-15-2022 07:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If you have ever been involved in any flight test program none of this feels "not right." Testing, rehearsals, practice are all necessary steps to the first in anything worth perusing.

For aircraft you do first flight and then spend 2 to 4 years in flight test (military aircraft even longer). This is not an unusual circumstance.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-15-2022 08:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Fred is absolutely correct (not that he needs to be told that).

"This is why we test," is not lip service from NASA, it is accurate of the situation. While it sounds odd, you want things to go wrong during a test so you can learn where the vehicle has issues. If a test goes 100 percent correct, it doesn't mean there are not issues needing to be addressed, it just means that particular run didn't trigger them. So the more issues you can expose early, the more you can correct before you go to fly.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-16-2022 08:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA has decided to roll back the Space Launch System to the Vehicle Assembly Building to replace a faulty upper stage check valve and a small leak on the tail service mast umbilical.

The timing of the move, how long the vehicle will be in the VAB and what this means for the another wet dress rehearsal attempt and subsequent launch date has yet to be said. NASA will hold a media teleconference on Monday (April 18) to discuss the status.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-18-2022 04:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Pending the weather, NASA plans to roll back the Space Launch System to the Vehicle Assembly Building on Tuesday, April 26.

After the repairs are complete, NASA will weigh its options, including possibly rolling back out, conducting the WDR and then going straight into the launch (without rolling back first). Even if they do that, though, the early June window (June 6-16) is "challenged" at this point.

Blackarrow
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posted 04-18-2022 06:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
...and after that (if memory serves) it's hurricane season and the likelihood of heavy summer thunderstorms.

GACspaceguy
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posted 04-19-2022 12:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
June through November is hurricane season so that would lock out half the year if that was concern and it has not been a show stopper in other programs. Also, for hurricanes, there is typically enough warning to relocate the vehicle. Heavy thunderstorms can happen anytime of the year in the south so to me neither would be a driver.

SpaceAngel
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posted 04-25-2022 09:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Once the SLS returns to the VAB, there's no estimate on how long until the launch vehicle remain until the repairs are complete?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-25-2022 10:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA has not yet released a schedule, projected or otherwise, for the work to be completed in the Vehicle Assembly Building.

Blackarrow
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posted 04-25-2022 12:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GACspaceguy:
Heavy thunderstorms can happen anytime of the year in the south so to me neither would be a driver.
Point taken, but I simply meant that delays into "hurricane season" just might add to the potential reasons for launch scrubs. Apollo 11 and Apollo 15 had mid-July launches and went off on time, but both launches were in the morning. ASTP was scheduled for a 3.50pm launch, and until the day before the launch there had been at least four days with heavy rain and lightning around the scheduled launch time.

That suggests that a morning launch would be best, but I suppose that depends on the position of the Moon.

SpaceAholic
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posted 05-03-2022 01:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
DLR pro­vides fe­male mea­sur­ing man­nequins for the NASA Artemis I mis­sion.
On this uncrewed test flight, it will be the twin measuring mannequins Helga and Zohar on board the Orion capsule. The MARE experiment devised by the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR), will use two identical 'phantoms' representative of the female body to investigate radiation exposure throughout the flight, which may last up to six weeks. The mission is vital in light of NASA's plan to send the first woman to the Moon during the Artemis programme.

Researchers at the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine in Cologne developed the experiment and have now delivered it to NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for installation. A new radiation protection vest also forms part of the experiment and will undergo testing. Artemis I is now planned to launch in summer 2022. The assembly and installation of the measuring mannequins is scheduled to take place approximately four weeks before the launch.


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