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  Details revealed in high-resolution Apollo photos (Page 3)

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Author Topic:   Details revealed in high-resolution Apollo photos
Captain Apollo
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posted 12-28-2012 04:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Captain Apollo   Click Here to Email Captain Apollo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Still not sure I get it. So there was a color mag left behind on A12, but it doesn't seem to have had any images of EVA 2 on it. Why take any images in B&W at all?

LM-12
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posted 02-10-2013 05:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA photo 70-HC-981 shows the SLA being lowered into place over the Apollo 14 LM in the MSOB.

Notice that the RCS plume deflectors are not attached yet. It must have been difficult to complete the LM processing after the LM was installed in the SLA. Working on the LM within the confines of the SLA must have been awkward.

Jim Behling
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posted 02-10-2013 07:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by LM-12:
It must have been difficult to complete the LM processing after the LM was installed in the SLA. Working on the LM within the confines of the SLA must have been awkward.
I wouldn't say that. Notice all the "remove before flight" red tags? They would have been removed before this operation, if there wasn't adequate access with internal platforms. Anyways it isn't big deal, internal fairing platforms are common place and use on Atlas (1 | 2) and Delta and were used on Titan.

LM-12
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posted 02-10-2013 08:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There is this photo of the Apollo 16 LM plaque installation in the SLA at Pad 39A. Looks like the access platforms can fold back when not in use.

Lou Chinal
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posted 02-12-2013 12:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lou Chinal   Click Here to Email Lou Chinal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Captain Apollo:
Why take any images in B&W at all?
I believe the logic was; Color vs B&W was that the B&W film had a finer gran to it. It could capture more detail. When Apollo 11 came back all the media screamed, "how could such an historic event be filmed in such a cheap way." I remember one reporter explaining B&W is a different type of photography.

Blackarrow
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posted 02-12-2013 05:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm slightly confused, Lou: which Apollo 11 images were shot in black and white?

Headshot
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posted 02-12-2013 06:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I believe that Lou is paraphrasing a statement made about the black and white television camera used to broadcast the Apollo XI moonwalk. I do not recall seeing any B&W images of XI's moonwalk.

I too am curious why B&W film was used to record moonwalk activities via the Hasselblad cameras for subsequent Apollo missions.

Lou Chinal
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posted 02-12-2013 06:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lou Chinal   Click Here to Email Lou Chinal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sorry, I was thinking of Apollo 12.

On edit: On second thought, I have to ask, didn't Apollo 7 have color TV? Or did they add color later?

LM-12
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posted 02-12-2013 06:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Magazine AS11-39 is black and white. All the images were taken from the LM windows, including several shots of the flag.

Headshot
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posted 02-12-2013 08:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Apollos 7 and 8 were equipped with black and white television cameras.

mach3valkyrie
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posted 02-13-2013 10:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mach3valkyrie   Click Here to Email mach3valkyrie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Lou Chinal:
On second thought, I have to ask, didn't Apollo 7 have color TV? Or did they add color later?
I believe Apollo 10 carried the first color TV camera.

LM-12
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posted 02-25-2013 04:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is a photo of Charlie Duke saluting the flag at the Descartes landing site. On the lower part of the flag poles, there were two red stripes marking the minimum and maximum depths to hammer the pole into the lunar surface.

LM-12
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posted 03-10-2013 03:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From the Apollo 12 mission transcripts during LM rendezvous and docking:

CONRAD: Look at the umbilical cover. Do you suppose that's where it got hit by lightning or something? What's made it brown? Look at the top of it; it's burned.

BEAN: Yes, I do believe that's where it got hit.

CONRAD: No. Maybe it gets burned by other --

BEAN: Maybe we better find out. Why don't you move over to the left a little bit? And I'll take a picture of it, and they can look at it later.

They did not have a 70mm camera in the LM to take a picture of the cover. CM photo AS12-47-6877 was taken earlier when the LM undocked for landing.

LM-12
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posted 03-21-2013 01:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You can see the VAB under construction in the distance at far left in this Gemini 3 launch photo S65-21520 taken in March 1965. You can also see two of the red Launch Umbilical Towers next to the VAB.

buckeyecal
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posted 03-21-2013 02:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for buckeyecal   Click Here to Email buckeyecal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by LM-12:
You can see the VAB under construction in the distance at far left in this Gemini 3 launch photo...
Sweet shot. I always have a fondness for anything dealing with Gemini 3. The flight took place less than 12 hours after I was born, in California on Mar. 22nd.

LM-12
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posted 03-21-2013 02:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
They were driving steel pilings into the ground for the VAB way back in August 1963. That was about three months after the MA-9 flight by Gordon Cooper. It is interesting to see how far along the VAB construction was even before the first manned Gemini flight.

Lunar_module_5
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posted 03-21-2013 03:54 PM           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Am I right in thinking that the rescue vehicle 2 that can be seen in the Gemini 3 photo may be of the same sort used for Space Shuttle launch ops?

LM-12
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posted 03-21-2013 04:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This might be the same Gemini rescue vehicle.

Lunar_module_5
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posted 03-21-2013 04:11 PM           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It could well be — and how cool would it be to have been in it watching Gemini 3 launch from there!

I remember there being a photo of an early shuttle launch taken from a similar distance with the rescue vehicle crew looking on — must have only been a few hundred metres from the pad! Amazing photo! Anyone got a hires of it?

heng44
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posted 03-22-2013 01:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That would be this STS-26 photo.

LM-12
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posted 04-06-2013 09:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The GATV visual status panel can be seen in this high-resolution photo taken on Gemini 10. The panel contains status lights and two clocks that show the burn time remaining in both the primary and secondary propulsion systems.

There is this description of the Agena Status Display Panel in Section 5.4 of the Propulsion Subsystem Engineering Analysis Report - Gemini-Agena Target Vehicle NASA document.

The Gemini-ATV Status Panel (ASP) is mounted on the forward end of the Target Docking Adapter of the Agena Target Vehicle where it is visible to the astronauts in the Gemini spacecraft during and after the docking maneuver. The panel displays information on the status and safety of the Agena propulsion, guidance, electrical power and docking systems. Originally, only eight Agena parameters were to be displayed in the Gemini spacecraft. However, the number of parameters increased to the point that the spacecraft no longer had the space or weight capability to accommodate them. Accordingly, the panel was placed on the Target Docking Adapter.

LM-12
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posted 04-07-2013 09:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA photo S66-50763 shows astronauts Conrad and Gordon arriving back at Cape Canaveral after the Gemini 11 flight.

In the background, you can see astronauts McDivitt, Scott and Schweickart who at the time were still the AS-204 backup crew.

Interesting photo when you consider the future prime and backup crewmember assignments for the Apollo 8/9 "D" mission, Apollo 12 and Apollo 15.

LM-12
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posted 04-08-2013 09:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You can see a lot of details in these high-res 16mm Apollo launch views.

LM-12
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posted 04-20-2013 10:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Apollo 6 SLA was damaged during launch back in April 1968. The damage can be seen in this high-res (48MB) version of NASA photo S68-29733. You can see a large hole in the SLA and pieces of debris falling by the third stage.

From the flight evaluation report:

The dynamic environment during S-IC boost exceeded the spacecraft design requirements. A structural failure of at least the SLA occurred at about 00:02:13. However, it was of such a nature that the flight loads were sustained for the remainder of the launch phase.

LM-12
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posted 05-18-2013 08:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Looks like an umbilical line did not disconnect properly during the Gemini 10 launch. The Gemini Program Corrective Action Listing document on page 95 explains the problem, cause and resolution:
The flyaway lanyard of Stage II fuel vent topping disconnect was broken in lift-off. Vent topping disconnect still attached at launch.

Not determined. It appears that the lanyard force did not reach the release collar because of interference with the vent hose.

Lanyard was rerigged to improve operation and reduce interference with the vent hose.

Tom
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posted 05-18-2013 12:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by LM-12:
This photograph taken a few seconds earlier shows both Apollo 7 and Apollo 8 in the same shot. NASA photo number unknown.
Great shot of both Apollo 7 and 8. Is there a link to the original without the black arrow pointing to Apollo 8? Thanks.

LM-12
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posted 05-18-2013 01:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No link that I am aware of. I have not seen the photo elsewhere.

mach3valkyrie
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posted 05-18-2013 04:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mach3valkyrie   Click Here to Email mach3valkyrie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There can't be too many photos with 7 and 8 in the same shot. Two days when they were on their pads at the same time. Pretty rare, but great to see. Thanks for the research.

heng44
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posted 05-19-2013 12:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

topmiler
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posted 05-19-2013 07:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for topmiler     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I like that. Any more pics of two Apollo launch vehicles together?

LM-12
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posted 05-19-2013 09:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That photo would not have been possible if the Mobile Service Structure (MSS) was also on pad 39A. Apollo 8 would have been hidden behind it.

The Apollo 7 crew must have had a great view of Apollo 8 in the distance as they walked across the swingarm to the white room on launch day.

Tom
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posted 05-19-2013 10:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
EXCELLENT (and in color!)... thanks, Ed!!!

Tom
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posted 05-19-2013 12:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by topmiler:
I like that. Any more pics of two Apollo launch vehicles together?

As Apollo 9 launched prior to the Apollo 10 roll-out, and 10 launched prior to the 11 roll-out, I believe the only other time can be when AS-204 and AS-206 were on LC-34 and 37 respectively...and of course Skylab 1 and 2.

mach3valkyrie
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posted 05-21-2013 12:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mach3valkyrie   Click Here to Email mach3valkyrie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tom:
I believe the only other time can be when AS-204 and AS-206 were on LC-34 and 37 respectively.
Do you mean AS-202 and AS-203 around July 1, 1966? I don't know if 202 was on Pad 34 when 203 launched from Pad 37, but AS-206 was used on Skylab 2, first manned mission.

Just trying to clarify.

dtemple
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posted 05-21-2013 12:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dtemple   Click Here to Email dtemple     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Apollo 1, SA-204 and SA-206 were on pads 34 and 37-B respectively at the same time. SA-206 was intended to launch LM-1 in March (if I recall correctly) of '67. Both launch vehicles were removed from the pads after the Apollo 1 fire. Ultimately, SA-204 was used to launch LM-1 from Pad 37-B and SA-206 to launch the first Skylab crew from Pad 39-B.

LM-12
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posted 06-03-2013 01:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tom:
Great shot of both Apollo 7 and 8.

The distance between the the two launch pads is about 6.5 miles.

LM-12
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posted 07-07-2013 10:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The high-resoluton version of ASTP photo AST-32-2695 seems to show some damage on the service module SPS engine nozzle. It looks like some type of heat-related blistering. I did not see any reference to this damage in the anomaly summary of the mission evaluation report.

Ronpur
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posted 07-07-2013 01:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ronpur   Click Here to Email Ronpur     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I read that this was some type of protective coating that would normally burn off completely during a mission that had the SPS firing longer. ASTP did not have a burn as long. In this case, it just bubbled up. I do not remember where I read that... (It was a detail I had to replicate for my model, LOL.)

mikej
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posted 07-07-2013 06:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mikej   Click Here to Email mikej     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, the blistering was the protective coating that would have normally burned off. Additional discussion in this thread.

The Apollo Soyuz Mission Evaluation Report to which I linked in that thread is no longer available via the NASA Non-Technical Reports Server, but is available on Scribd.

LM-12
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posted 08-15-2013 09:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Was the SM retractable spotlight deployed at the time of the Apollo 13 explosion? The pole looks damaged in photo 9031.


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