Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Publications & Multimedia
  DOX Productions/David Sington's "In the Shadow of the Moon" feature documentary (Page 3)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 5 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   DOX Productions/David Sington's "In the Shadow of the Moon" feature documentary
FFrench
Member

Posts: 3093
From: San Diego
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 10-08-2007 10:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I found this interview an interesting read.

robsouth
Member

Posts: 607
From: West Midlands, UK
Registered: Jun 2005

posted 10-09-2007 12:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for robsouth     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
I found this interview an interesting read.
Buzz Aldrin was in the LM during the coast to the moon in that photo of him and John Young has not been in space more than anyone else.

blue_eyes
Member

Posts: 161
From: North Carolina, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 10-10-2007 09:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for blue_eyes   Click Here to Email blue_eyes     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
I found this interview an interesting read.

Francis, I enjoyed the article very much. It's just so rare to read any article today that stresses the preciousness of our human lives, the importance of simply being a human being. Anyway, it brightened my day and I'm very glad that you posted the link. Thank you!

FFrench
Member

Posts: 3093
From: San Diego
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 10-10-2007 09:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks so much, I'm glad you enjoyed reading that - I found it an interesting interview.

spaceman1953
Member

Posts: 933
From: South Bend, IN United States of America
Registered: Apr 2002

posted 10-15-2007 07:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceman1953   Click Here to Email spaceman1953     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, since my father died in 1993, my mom has taken on the duties of going to see space movies with me. (Although me and dad never did see any space movies together... other than LIVE coverage all those years on TV).

Yesterday, after niece's Alexandra's birthday cake and ice cream, me and mom went to "In the Shadow...."

She said there would be less than a dozen peeps in the audience, 4:45 PM on a Sunday afternoon, and I guessed less than 1/2 dozen. There were 6 of us in the theatre, a modern 16-theatre complex in South Bend... the other 4 were together and although we did not speak afterward or before the film, they "knew" someone in the program or in the movie. The NASA travelling exhibit that was at Glenn/collectSPACE exhibit this year is in South Bend this week, so they might have had a connection with that.

Anyway, I only fell asleep 4 or 5 times during the film, but I think it was popcorn/ cake/ ice cream overload that did that... for the most part.

Buzz Aldrin had great fun contributing, that was quite obvious and enjoyable.

Not alot of that "never before seen" stuff but some SELDOM seen stuff: liftoff of Eagle from the Moon, a longer clip of that than I generally see, and the views of Apollo 11 astro's from the camera out Eagles' window, longer than "you" usually see.

So if you followed all of this like most of us did when it happened live, this is a bit disappointing. No real promotion sure does not help.

The interesting "credit" to me was "Special Thanks To David Scott". Apparently he was more of a contributor than others.

Most I have ever seen of Alan Bean talking about his experience, so that was fun.

And our dear friend Gene Cernan's certainly owes nobody any apology for not fighting in "his" war. But I certainly understand his sentiment.

Cheers! So I guess I would say to go see it with someone younger who does not know all the "detail", give them a crash course before so they are not totally swamped, however.

mjanovec
Member

Posts: 3593
From: Midwest, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 10-16-2007 01:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by spaceman1953:
Not alot of that "never before seen" stuff but some SELDOM seen stuff: liftoff of Eagle from the Moon, a longer clip of that than I generally see

What you were seeing was the clip from Apollo 14, not Apollo 11. While I understand why some are annoyed using footage from other missions in place of the Apollo 11 footage, this is one instance where I think the substitution makes sense.

spacecraft films
Member

Posts: 802
From: Columbus, OH USA
Registered: Jun 2002

posted 10-16-2007 06:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spacecraft films   Click Here to Email spacecraft films     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Actually it was a clip from Apollo 14, followed by a clip from a "J" mission, I believe Apollo 15, though I didn't check it out (By choosing these two they could get both the fluttering flag AND the giant piece of flying mylar).

And as covered earlier in the thread, the substitution never makes sense, any more so than a misstatement of fact would make sense...

spaceman1953
Member

Posts: 933
From: South Bend, IN United States of America
Registered: Apr 2002

posted 10-16-2007 07:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceman1953   Click Here to Email spaceman1953     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the "substitution" comments...

(My personal most-annoying use of a moon picture, is the one from Apollo 15 with the mountain in the background, when it is used in conjunction with Apollo 11!)

But at least in the film credits, they state that there was an instance or two of substitution. SOMETHING to their credit!

spacecraft films
Member

Posts: 802
From: Columbus, OH USA
Registered: Jun 2002

posted 10-17-2007 08:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spacecraft films   Click Here to Email spacecraft films     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There was more than an instance or two in this film.

And I stand by what I have said before on the subject. Using inaccurate footage is the same thing as saying that Alan Shepard was the first man on the moon. In a documentary, passing footage off for something it is not is the very same thing as making a misstatement of fact. As an end product presented as being a visual documentary of history the standard on visuals should be no less than a standard of fact. Placing a very small and vague disclaimer at the very end of the credits does not earn a pass on accuracy during the film.

bruce
Member

Posts: 830
From: Fort Mill, SC, USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 10-19-2007 10:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bruce   Click Here to Email bruce     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's another review of the movie that also mentions the Francis French/Colin Burgess books.

It does seem as thought the movie is working to help promote their book, or books, in this case!

capoetc
Member

Posts: 1705
From: Newnan GA (USA)
Registered: Aug 2005

posted 10-19-2007 11:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by bruce:
Here's another review of the movie that also mentions the Francis French/Colin Burgess books.
"I thoroughly recommend seeing it when the film is released nationally next year."

That quote was from the review ... I'm glad to see that it will be released nationally.

FFrench
Member

Posts: 3093
From: San Diego
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 10-19-2007 01:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Bruce, for posting that.
quote:
Originally posted by John:
That quote was from the review... I'm glad to see that it will be released nationally.
John, in case you didn't know (it isn't too clear from that page), the reviewer, Kerrie Dougherty, is the Curator of Space Technology at the Powerhouse Museum which is in Australia. Therefore, if your post was meant to indicate a hope for a wider US release, her reference to 'national release' is likely to be related only to Australia.

mjanovec
Member

Posts: 3593
From: Midwest, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 10-19-2007 02:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by spacecraft films:
And I stand by what I have said before on the subject. Using inaccurate footage is the same thing as saying that Alan Shepard was the first man on the moon.

I can't recall if the film directly states that what you're seeing is the Apollo 11 LM launch or not, since they discuss the other landing missions before they show the launch sequence from the lunar surface. Granted, it is somewhat implied, because they once again return to the Apollo 11 story when it came time to show the footage.

The use of the Apollo 14 footage doesn't bother me because it was footage of the correct event for that portion of the mission, even if it wasn't the correct mission. I know our opinions differ on this, but I feel there are instances where the artistic vision of a film overrides the need for 100% accuracy is using mission-specific footage. The greater purpose of the film is to show the magnificent accomplishment of Apollo and give viewers the best representation of what flying the missions was like. The Apollo 11 liftoff footage simply doesn't convey what launching from the lunar surface is like as well as the Apollo 14 does. If this film were focused only on the Apollo 11 story, then I would be more concerned with the use of that footage.

I'm more bothered by the use of footage to represent an event that is totally different than what the footage actually shows, such as footage they used to represent TLI. I would have been fine with them using it to represent the staging event (even if, in reality, the staging was for a Saturn IB, not a Saturn V), since it's footage that deserves to be shown. I just didn't like them using it to represent a mission-event that it was not.

capoetc
Member

Posts: 1705
From: Newnan GA (USA)
Registered: Aug 2005

posted 10-19-2007 07:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
Therefore, if your post was meant to indicate a hope for a wider US release, her reference to 'national release' is likely to be related only to Australia.
RATS! ... and, thanks for the clarification, I missed that. I guess I'll just have to wait for the Discovery Channel...

BMacKinnon
Member

Posts: 134
From: Waterford, MI. USA
Registered: Jul 2007

posted 10-19-2007 07:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for BMacKinnon   Click Here to Email BMacKinnon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In the same week I finished reading Francis and Colin's book "In The Shadow Of The Moon" and tonight I got to finally see the movie of the same title with my kids.

First for my kids' review of the movie:

From the perspective of my 12 year old daughter - "It was very good. She thought the original footage was real cool. Seeing the astronauts she has met and yet to meet on the big screen was neat. She looks forward to meeting more in the future and tell them that she saw them in the movie. Their perspective of what they saw in space very interesting."

For my 10 year old son - "He thought it was cool seeing the people in the old footage and then them talking about what was going on. It was cool seeing the rockets blasting off and all the fire coming out. He thought it was neat seeing the images of earth from the space ships as they traveled to the moon. He liked seeing the footage of Neil's first step on the moon hearing the accompanying "That's one small step" and when Buzz was first to pee on the moon."

There is no real need to discuss any footage that was out of order or "misrepresenting" another mission. For me the movie flowed seamlessly. From the original footage, recent interviews and accompanying soundtrack it was very enjoyable. John Young still cracks me up and Alan Bean definitely has the "Right Stuff"!

A lot of the original footage I have seen before but the footage of staging as viewed from space and then interspersed with footage from the ground was a nice treat.

The only way to have made this film any better was for more of the living Apollo Astronauts to have granted interviews. I recommend that everyone see this film.

It is a unique historical record of a time in our country that should never be forgotten.

bruce
Member

Posts: 830
From: Fort Mill, SC, USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 10-29-2007 08:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bruce   Click Here to Email bruce     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hugo-Award-nominated reviewer Steven Silver has written an interesting review of the movie, that also mentions the book of the same name by Francis and Colin. It's amazing how, given the coincidence of timing with the unrelated releases of a book and a movie of the same name, they seem to compliment each other in multiple reviews!

ColinBurgess
Member

Posts: 1567
From: Sydney, Australia
Registered: Sep 2003

posted 11-02-2007 04:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was fortunate enough to preview this documentary on Thursday night at a special media screening here in Sydney. The film won't be out in Australia for some months I'd imagine (if at all, I dare to add). It certainly felt quite strange seeing the title come up, as it is the same name as the title Francis and I independently gave our book, but I soon settled down and enjoyed one of the most brilliant documentaries I have ever seen on the Apollo astronauts. Everything about it was magnificent, and I'd agree with others that Mike Collins really stole the show with his incisive yet lyrical observations. Dave Scott looked a little stiff and camera-shy to me, but everyone else seemed so relaxed and amiable, and even Buzz Aldrin brought several smiles to my face with his stories and that twinkle in his eyes.

A great and masterful piece of film-making, and I'm delighted to have finally seen it after so much hype.

cspg
Member

Posts: 4046
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 11-10-2007 04:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For North Americans, the DVD is to be released on Feb. 12, 2008. You can look it up at amazon.com.

Jay Chladek
Member

Posts: 2211
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 11-11-2007 01:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well you know what they say Colin, great minds think alike (especially on titles for books and movies). Glad you enjoyed it.

Captain Apollo
Member

Posts: 169
From: UK
Registered: Jun 2004

posted 11-20-2007 04:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Captain Apollo   Click Here to Email Captain Apollo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by nasamad:
From the description the doc sounds like a new version of "For All Mankind" to me.
Saw ITSOTM last week and it made me rewatch FAM tonight. Reminded me that I don't really like FAM because of the way it mingles and mixed footage indiscriminately (Saturn V launch with inserts of Apollo Soyuz interior, etc,) but one query I would like to know the answer to is this:

Several sequences in FAM play faster than in ITSOTM - the scene of the SIVB leaving the SII stage for instance is much quicker. Which is the right speed?

spacecraft films
Member

Posts: 802
From: Columbus, OH USA
Registered: Jun 2002

posted 11-24-2007 08:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spacecraft films   Click Here to Email spacecraft films     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I believe it is actually the S-IVB stage leaving an S-1B stage.

Don't remember if it was sped up or not.

Of course there is considerable mixup of footage in ITSOTM as well. Apollo 14 and 15 lunar liftoff used as Apollo 11, Apollo 12 LM footage used for Apollo 11 LM after undocking... etc.

Blackarrow
Member

Posts: 2024
From: Belfast, United Kingdom
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 12-03-2007 07:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I finally saw "ITSOTM" on the big screen at the Queen's Film Theatre, Queen's University, Belfast, last week. It was a thoroughly enjoyable and often very moving experience. There were around 40 in the audience, and the film was very well received. In addition to the stunning photography, there was a surprising amount of laughter as some of the astronauts showed that going to the Moon had its lighter moments. I have read elsewhere that Michael Collins was the star of the show, and I wouldn't disagree. His commentary is insightful, witty, moving and inspirational. We know he writes well, and this film is proof that he can hold an audience spellbound too. Special mention should also be made of Charlie Duke and Ed Mitchell, whose thoughtful observations greatly enhance the film, and Alan Bean who comes across as one of the most genial and likeable of the astronauts. (Having met him recently, I know this to be an accurate portrayal).

At first, the sight of a procession of septuagenarians, their faces often filling the screen, takes a little getting used to, but as they tell their stories, you quickly realise that these are the insights that will be called upon in decades to come when researchers and film makers want contributions from men who will no longer be among us.

I urge anyone with an interest in Project Apollo to see this film, preferably on the big screen. For me, it was a real privilege.

derek
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 12-04-2007 03:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for derek   Click Here to Email derek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Saw it at QFT last week, actually brought some autographs and lunar meteorites along to show the audience, who were even more amazed that I intend making a sub-orbital flight!! None realised how much some of these guys charge for autographs- mine were free! Quote from BBC News 24 re the narrators: "their wise and weathered faces are more fascinating than any lunar landscape."

Blackarrow
Member

Posts: 2024
From: Belfast, United Kingdom
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 12-04-2007 06:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Derek, I didn't see any familiar faces in the impressively sizeable audience on the night I saw the film, so I assume you went on a later night. I hadn't seen the comment about the "wise and weathered faces" but it was absolutely right. I'm sure the director saw a comparison between the round, craggy face of the Moon and the round, craggy faces of the astronauts. This film is a fine tribute to a magnificent achievement and the men who did it.

MCroft04
Member

Posts: 1219
From: Smithfield, Me, USA
Registered: Mar 2005

posted 12-04-2007 07:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ColinBurgess:
Hopefully the documentary is not some turkey, which might impact on our sales due to bearing the same name.
Now that's it's been almost a year Colin, how do you feel about the documentary's impact, if any, on your book?

ColinBurgess
Member

Posts: 1567
From: Sydney, Australia
Registered: Sep 2003

posted 12-05-2007 02:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi Mel!

I'd have to admit my immediate reaction on hearing that a documentary with the same title was being released was one of some disappointment, as we had come up with that title after throwing suggestions back and forth for a while, and then Googling around to make sure it hadn't been used before. It had its origins in a line of the poem I wrote in "Fallen Astronauts" which spoke of "fleeting shadows on the moon," and it evolved from there. Whereas of course the title of the movie came from a remark made during the filming by Gene Cernan.

When Francis and I first heard about this documentary we were understandably concerned in regard to its quality or otherwise. As it is, the documentary has turned out to be a wonderful piece of film-making, and a great introduction to the Apollo lunar program that has excited, delighted and inspired many people as it gained an ever-wider release. Francis was even invited to speak, along with astronaut Jim Newman, at the San Diego Cinema Society's special viewing of the movie.

As you can see further back in this thread, Francis and I have both recorded our individual reactions after viewing the documentary, and we both loved it. Each of us feels that the documentary and the book complement each other wonderfully well, with both offering different angles and depths in relating these important stories.

I know that Francis will join me in congratulating the documentary-makers and wish them continued success with their truly stellar introduction to Apollo's crewmembers and their achievements.

ColinBurgess
Member

Posts: 1567
From: Sydney, Australia
Registered: Sep 2003

posted 12-05-2007 02:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Francis has just reminded me that there was a second title source for our book. In the first series book, "Into That Silent Sea," we included a verse from Samuel Taylor Coleridge's evocative poem "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" from whence the title of that book came. We then went back to that same poem seeking a title for the follow-on book and Francis came across the following verse:

The harbour-bay was clear as glass,
So smoothly it was strewn!
And on the bay the moon light lay,
And the shadow of the moon.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27327
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-04-2008 08:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
For North Americans, the DVD is to be released on Feb. 12, 2008.
Channel 4 DVD have announced the UK Region 2 DVD release of In the Shadow of the Moon on 31st March 2008 priced at 19.99.

Scott
Member

Posts: 3293
From: Houston, TX
Registered: May 2001

posted 02-04-2008 09:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott   Click Here to Email Scott     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is an exceptional movie IMO. I believe it is the best movie of its kind and one of the best movies I have ever seen, period. I haven't enjoyed a space-related book or movie this much since reading Carrying the Fire many years ago. On a related note, in part due to its rich Collins interview content, it is almost like a movie version of that classic book. I loved it.

capoetc
Member

Posts: 1705
From: Newnan GA (USA)
Registered: Aug 2005

posted 02-04-2008 09:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just a week to go until ITSOTM is released on DVD in the US. I'm really looking forward to seeing it since it never came to the theaters here in Delaware...

Are there still plans to show it on TV? (PBS or Discovery, I think, was where I heard they might be showing it).

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27327
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-04-2008 10:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by capoetc:
Are there still plans to show it on TV?
Discovery Channel will showcase it this summer as part of their partnership with NASA to mark the agency's 50th anniversary.

mikej
Member

Posts: 374
From: Germantown, WI USA
Registered: Jan 2004

posted 02-04-2008 06:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mikej   Click Here to Email mikej     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I attended the America in Space Technical Symposium this weekend, and producer Duncan Copp was in attendance and presented a showing of the movie.

He said that he's also working on a 6-part series to be aired in June on the Discovery Channel called Moon Machines. As I recall, there are to be episodes on the Saturn V, the LRV, and the space suits (don't remember the remaining three).

He had an excerpt of a "rough cut" of the Saturn V episode, featuring Apollo 4, which looked very promising (despite some footage which was obviously not from Apollo 4).

skippy in space
Member

Posts: 242
From: Aberdeen Scotland
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-11-2008 03:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for skippy in space   Click Here to Email skippy in space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Got an email from Amazon saying the DVD was delayed until March.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27327
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-11-2008 03:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by skippy in space:
Got an email from Amazon saying the DVD was delayed until March.
Indeed, Amazon now notes March 15, 2008 as the release date for the Region 1 version.

capoetc
Member

Posts: 1705
From: Newnan GA (USA)
Registered: Aug 2005

posted 02-12-2008 12:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Received my copy (rental copy, that is) via NetFlix today!

mjanovec
Member

Posts: 3593
From: Midwest, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 02-12-2008 01:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by capoetc:
Received my copy (rental copy, that is) via NetFlix today!

Interesting. I suspected the delay was probably because they weren't yet finished creating the disc (and the extras)...but maybe the delay was in having enough copies produced by the original release date.

Can you let us know what DVD extras, if any, are on the version you got from Netflix?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27327
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-12-2008 02:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It seems a failed merger is the reason why the release of In The Shadow of the Moon has been delayed.

According to Variety's Video Business, Image Entertainment, which was to release Shadow, "has won the ability to continue distributing ThinkFilm titles through its output agreement with label parent CT1 Holdings, even though the planned merger between Image and CT1 affiliate BTP Acquisition Co. has been dismantled."

According to the report, "as of last week, ThinkFilm's In the Shadow of the Moon was not expected to street today as initially scheduled because of the stalled agreement.

"In announcing the continuation of the pact today, Image did not specify when In the Shadow of the Moon would roll out to retail. Amazon.com lists a March 15 date for the title. Image management did not immediately respond for comment."

capoetc
Member

Posts: 1705
From: Newnan GA (USA)
Registered: Aug 2005

posted 02-12-2008 07:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just finished watching the DVD... absolutely fantastic, and I will be buying a copy!

Ron Howard filmed an intro to the film which you can choose to watch or not (there is a button to watch the film "with Ron Howard" or "without Ron Howard").

The extras include commentary by the filmmakers (I didn't watch that yet), making of the music for the documentary, theatrical trailers, and MANY unused or revised scenes that include some great material.

For example, Gemini is hardly mentioned in the film, but there is a long sequence in the special features about Gemini. There is also talk from several astros about their flying in Korea and in the Cold War.

Michael Collins also gets in his well-known dig against autograph collectors (as he mentions in "Carrying the Fire"). I won't tell you what he said -- you can watch for yourself.

Overall, I would have to say this is one DVD that the space enthusiast/historian absolutely cannot miss!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27327
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-12-2008 09:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

In The Shadow Of The Moon

Running Time: 100 minutes
Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles: English, Spanish

Bonus features:

  • Introduction: Ron Howard
  • Trailer gallery
  • Audio Commentary: David Singleton, Director; David Fairhead, Editor; Chris Riley, Archive Producer
  • Behind The Scenes 'Making Of'
  • Deleted and Extended Scenes: Over 60 minutes of stories from the astronauts and footage from Apollo Missions
  • Featurettes: "Never Before Seen NASA Footage," "Scoring Apollo with composer Philip Sheppard"

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 3023
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-12-2008 11:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Any idea if this is out (or forthcoming) in Blue Ray HD?


This topic is 5 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2012 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement