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Author Topic:   Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center
Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-15-2007 05:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center release
Cosmosphere Plans to Expand

The Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center has completed the purchase of the former Hutchinson Floral and Gifts building located south of the Cosmosphere at 521 East 11th Ave. Hutchinson Floral and Gifts closed on December 31, 2005.

The acquisition of the property will give the Cosmosphere the opportunity for growth. The board of directors is considering different options for site development. "Expansion on the current property is no longer possible so we are excited to know there is growth potential," said Cosmosphere Senior Vice President, Jim Remar. The expansion will be the first major physical growth project since the facilities grand reopening in 1997.

"Now that the sale is complete the Cosmosphere foundation board will be conducting a fundraising drive to cover the cost of the property, plus site improvements," said Ann Brown, foundation board chair.

Anyone interested in learning more about the fundraising campaign can contact the Cosmosphere administrative office.

Dwayne Day
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posted 04-02-2007 11:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dwayne Day   Click Here to Email Dwayne Day     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm going to be making a visit to the Kansas Cosmosphere this summer after the Heinlein symposium.

Anybody have any suggestions about my visit other than "show up at the door"?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-02-2007 11:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A few lessons learned, based on my own experience visiting the Cosmosphere:
  • If your schedule will allow it, permit yourself two days to tour the museum. The Cosmosphere is deceptive by its outward appearance: there's a lot to see within and while a day would suffice if all you desire is the tourist/walk-through experience, if you want to stop and read the displays or just comprehend the detail on many of the artifacts, two days are definitely better than one.

  • Ask to meet the curator. Better yet, contact the museum in advance so you can coordinate schedules. While I would recommend the same for the new CEO, Chris Orwoll (based solely on my interview with him), the curator knows the collection -- both what is on display and what is not -- better than anyone and can point out the real hidden treasures.

  • If you have the opportunity, get a chance to climb into their Apollo CM interior mock-up, originally built for the TV movie adaptation of James Michener's SPACE. In fact, touring (if not also participating in) their space camp facilities is something I think most tourists miss and if offered is worth your time (at least it was worth mine).

mdmyer
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posted 04-02-2007 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I often go to the Cosmosphere two or three times a year. I always take my kids but they always rush me through the museum. One day I went without them with the sole purpose of really seeing the museum. Gemini 6 and Gemini 10 were at the Cosmosphere for restoration at the time. I spent a full 5 hours in the museum and that was before they added the Early Space Flight Gallery. Since then I have been able to read most of the displays in that gallery. We really like Dr. Goddard's Lab, especially if "Howie Gee" a.k.a. Howard George, is portraying Dr. Goddard.

Their all day pass includes one I-MAX show, one planetarium show, one Dr. Goddard's Lab show, and the Museum. If you are going to be there for one day I would suggest getting there early and do the Museum. Keep track of the time and come out of the museum for Dr. Goddard's show, then go back to the museum. You can go into and leave the museum as often as you want. The I-MAX shows are usually good but the planetarium shows are usually basic so if you need to skip one show that is the one I would miss.

It might be better to get advanced tickets, I always do. You can pick your show times. For full information go to the Cosmosphere's website.

E2M Lem Man
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posted 04-03-2007 10:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for E2M Lem Man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Two days is best. I had the occasion of having Chris Orowell in the Downey ALF office last week, and he is the right man for the job. Friendly, and knowledgeable, I am really happy they got a guy like that for the Cosmosphere. Jim Remar was really great when I last went back.

Be prepared for surprises, and fun!

fabfivefreddy
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posted 04-03-2007 10:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fabfivefreddy   Click Here to Email fabfivefreddy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I also regularly attend the Cosmosphere.

The Cosmosphere does a better job than any space museum of showing the political, military, propaganda and patriotic aspects of the German, Russian and American programs. It really gets into the why as well as how questions of space history.

They also have a nice sized moon rock- nothing like the displays at JSC, but still a nice item to see.

For those with kids, Hedrick's exotic animal farm (a bed and breakfast) is fabulous. Kids can ride animals and feed kangaroos.

Yoder is 5 miles South of Hutch and has a great Amish community. Some of the best country cookin' is served there. Also has great crafts and shops.

TRS
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posted 04-04-2007 03:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for TRS   Click Here to Email TRS     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And I'll second the advice to take at least two days.

Our visit to the Cosmosphere last year was one of the absolute highlights of our time in the US and I am planning to head back this year because two days just wasn't enough.

They have put an amazing amount of thought into how their artifacts are displayed, how the story is told, and ensuring that this is one of the most visitor-friendly museums you will have the pleasure of attending.

And if you get the chance do make contact first - it is well worth it.

And take extra cards for your camera - lots of them...

LunarRover
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posted 04-25-2007 12:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LunarRover   Click Here to Email LunarRover     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dwayne Day:
Anybody have any suggestions about my visit other than "show up at the door"?
Yup. Bring something to wipe the bottom of your tongue off when you finally have to leave. It's gonna need it after dragging around on the floor all day long.

This museum has magnificent artifacts and they tell the story like no one else....the combination is breathtaking/overwhelming. Be sure to take a few minutes to soak up the sound of the GT out in the blast pit too. The Cosmosphere is likely way beyond what you may be expecting...

Ofttimes a person can be virtually alone in some of the galleries, after the kids have rushed through before closing time or whatever. Savor those moments, step back, listen to that soundtrack in the background, look around, and let it all soak in. Gives me goosebumps just thinking about the times I've been fortunate enough to do that.

A second vote for some of what Robert offered, two days to really do it right.

Have a great time.

stsmithva
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posted 07-31-2007 10:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for stsmithva   Click Here to Email stsmithva     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for this thread I am driving from Virginia to Colorado this week, and I've decided to ignore the Mapquest directions so as to go to the Kansas Cosmosphere. Just thought I'd see if anyone had any more tips to add. I'm afraid that instead of the two days I'd love to spend, we'll have just a few hours after driving from St. Louis. Thank goodness it's open until 9:00!

On an unrelated-but-not-quite-worth-its-own-thread note, one of the very first posts I put on CS about six months ago was asking for advice on how to consign some of my autographs. I got some great help via replies and personal e-mails, and my wife and I just returned from a two-week honeymoon in Ireland that we were able to enjoy/afford thanks to the proceeds! Thanks again.

kyra
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posted 08-01-2007 11:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kyra   Click Here to Email kyra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Are there any recommended hotels near the Cosmosphere?

I'm thinking of either of driving or taking a bus trip from Denver. Given the gas prices, a bus trip with a well loaded iPod might be the way to go.

mercsim
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posted 08-02-2007 10:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mercsim   Click Here to Email mercsim     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have stayed at the Grand Prairie several times. They have an indoor water park that is space themed. Its not a 5 star but its clean and the water park is cool. Its only a few minutes away. I don't know if they have a shuttle or not. I always have a car when I'm there. If they don't have a shuttle, try calling the Cosmosphere and seeing if someone can come get you. If you arrange it before hand, It shouldn't be a problem. Its a small town and the hotel in less than 5 minutes away. Offer to be picked up on someones way in. They start at 8:00 but they open at 9:00. Once they know your situation, they should accomodate you. Then you get the extra hour of quite time with the place to yourself! If you have any problems or need anything else, PM me. I have friends there and am a regular Volunteer at the museum.

The small town hospitality is wonderful and all the museum staff are great people!

kyra
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posted 08-08-2007 12:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kyra   Click Here to Email kyra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you for the tips!

I've decided to get Teggie (my Integra) ready for a road trip. Gas has come down a tad and I get 34 mpg and its 95% highway.

I'm on a bit of a mission. One of the things I wanted to do is get a bunch of hi-res digital pics of the Vostok that is on display to get measurements of such banal things as portholes, distances between bolts in the hatch sill, etc.

A secondary objective is to find out what is actually on site that is Vostok/Voskhod flown (besides the ship)or actual technical or historical data relating to these flights.

Jay Chladek
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posted 08-13-2007 04:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If you make frequent trips to the region, stick a Cosmosphere visit into plans since things change there on a frequent basis. Granted many of the exhibits there are what I've seen for at least the past 8 years, but they keep adding stuff. The Gemini Titan launchpad display was new when I visited first in 2005 and it is a very cool exhibit.

Liberty Bell 7 is also back there now, but they had one other Mercury capsule on display, the last time I visited in 2006, as a place holder in preparation for LB7 to return that fall.

E2M Lem Man
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posted 08-14-2007 05:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for E2M Lem Man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That "placeholder" capsule was recently transferred to the Evergreen museum in Oregon - I was told by Chris Orwell, the museum's director.

stsmithva
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posted 08-21-2007 06:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for stsmithva   Click Here to Email stsmithva     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As you can see a few posts above, several weeks ago I asked for tips for visiting the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson. Now that I have been there, I would like to share my thoughts. I am not going to try to list everything I saw, for two reasons. First, that would be exhausting for me to write and for you to read. But just as importantly, for me part of the pleasure of visiting was to be surprised to find myself standing two feet from things I had seen only in photos or on film.

Before I get into specifics -- I don't want to start a battle here, but I think the Cosmosphere's small size allows it to do an even better job than the National Air and Space Museum of telling the story of manned space flight up through Apollo-Soyuz. The National Air and Space Museum has to accommodate about 8,000,000 visitors a year, so many of its space exhibits are in huge, open galleries. The Cosmosphere is one of the most linear museums I have ever visited. One is guided through hallways and rooms that would be much too narrow for the National Air and Space Museum, but are perfectly suited for a chronologically-organized presentation. Also, there are LOTS of paragraphs-long descriptions of the artifacts or the events, and at a larger, more crowded museum it wouldn't be possible to stand there are your leisure and read them.

Let's put it this way: I have been interested in the space program since elementary school. I have collected space autographs, documents, books, and artifacts for years; and I could happily watch a documentary every day for a year. I had a wonderful time at the Cosmosphere, seeing some things I already knew about and learning a lot of new information. BUT my wife of a month (no, the Cosmosphere was not our honeymoon), who is just starting to become interested in the space program, also greatly enjoyed herself. Several times I finished with a room before she did. Any place that appeals to people with that range of background knowledge and pre-existing interest is doing a great job.

Okay, here are some of the things we especially enjoyed. If I get any of the terminology incorrect, please have mercy.

  • A nice big Redstone is parked in front of the museum. I think that might be the first time I've seen a rocket outdoors. (I haven't been to any of the space sites in Florida or Texas.)

  • In the lobby, there is an SR-71 suspended from the ceiling at an angle, so its nose is at your knees and its tail is about 30 feet up. I remember being impressed when I saw one close-up at Udvar-Hazy (I live just a couple of miles south of it), but having one hanging just a few feet over your head really gives you an idea of how HUGE that thing is!

  • My first observation of the exhibits starts with a quibble. Unless I missed it, there is very little at the beginning about Dr. Robert Goddard. I know there is a whole live show called "Dr. Goddard's Lab" about his work, but you have to pay extra for that and the last show had already ended when we got there. (Oh, yes: we had a painfully brief three hours at the museum, having driven from St. Louis that day and needing to continue on to Durango, Colorado the next day.) So the first thing on display when you go downstairs for the museum is a large photograph of Adolf Hitler, which begins the V-1 and V-2 exhibit. I would have liked to have learned more about Goddard — why and how he did his research, what people thought of it at the time, etc.

  • The role of the Nazis in developing rocket technology is sad, but also important to know and very well described here. There are diagrams and hardware, but also the human element, such as descriptions of how many slave laborers died.

  • I liked how the end of WWII was illustrated with a huge blow-up of the front page of a newspaper, because if you look carefully, you'll see that it is the local newspaper for Hutchinson. Nice local touch!

  • There are several rooms full of details about the struggle between the Americans and Soviets at the start of the Cold War to obtain rocket technology and expertise; the work by test pilots; and American failures and Soviet successes at the start of the Space Race.

  • You get to stand in front of the four-inch-thick blast windows from Blockhouse 5/6 at Cape Canaveral. Through those windows the launch crews viewed the launch of Explorer 1, as well as the flights by Shepard and Grissom.

  • Remember that amazing footage of Mercury-Atlas 1, which ripped apart at 58 seconds and tumbled back to Earth? Well, the shattered remains of the fortunately-unmanned Mercury spacecraft #4 are on display.

  • When you go through a door to the outside, you are suddenly at the base of a giant Titan rocket on a launch pad. You can hear recordings of technical announcements as the launch nears. If you use your imagination, it's possible to get a little freaked out to be standing so close.

  • The large room for Mercury and Gemini had many artifacts, such as Liberty Bell 7, which you probably know the Cosmosphere recovered from the sea floor. But I liked the video of Alan Shepard's daughter describing what it was like to have such a famous father. It did make me wish that there were more video screens with the astronauts telling their stories in their own words, besides the one with Schirra.

  • The same room had a LOT of good material on the Soviet manned space program during the 1960s.

  • The Apollo exhibit could be a museum all on its own. Some highlights:
    • A Saturn V's "Q-ball": a 36-cm instrument perched on top of the Launch Escape System, which makes it — to use the technical term- the very tippy-top of the whole massive thing. You can look at that Q-ball, then at a model of the Saturn V and all the components of a lunar mission, then at the Q-ball again, and just shake your head in amazement over the sheer scale. You can also use for scale the Apollo 13 Command Module "Odyssey", which the KCSC restored. (There is a panel describing how this came to be, implying that an embarrassed NASA was glad to send it off to France for years rather than put a memento of a "failed" mission on display in the U.S.)

    • An entire wall of descriptions and artifacts with the title "There Ain't No Graceful Way." You might be able to guess what that is about. Two words: "Constellation Urion."

    • There is a display of Hasselblad film backs returned from every Apollo mission, signed by an astronaut from each mission, with large photographs taken using that film.

    • A wall of dozens of flown items. There is a similar wall at NASM. This one has the gloves worn by Armstrong and Aldrin on the moon. I remember wishing I had a half-hour just to look at that stuff.

    • They have one of the three White Rooms —  the compartment through which astronauts entered the Saturn V. You can actually get inside it and stand right where a third of the Apollo (and Skylab and ASTP) astronauts stood for the last time on the planet before their missions.

    • One of the first posts I made on cS was asking how the Lunar Rover was packed on the LEM. Well, next to a Grumman mock-up LEM is a display showing exactly that.

    • Finally, you can look through large windows at the Restoration Laboratory at whatever is being worked on at the time.

  • And then back upstairs to the looming SR-71.

In closing, I'll just repeat what others have already written on this thread: it is well worth the drive, and allow yourself a full day... or two!

Lou Chinal
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posted 08-22-2007 07:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lou Chinal   Click Here to Email Lou Chinal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Do they have a Vostok on display?

stsmithva
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posted 08-22-2007 10:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for stsmithva   Click Here to Email stsmithva     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
To quote from their web page:
The Smithsonian-affiliated Cosmosphere is the only museum where visitors can view American and Soviet spacecraft side-by-side to compare their features. The gallery houses the actual, flown Gemini X spacecraft, the flown Russian Vostok spacecraft, and an engineering model of the Voskhod, as well as space suits used in the Mercury, Gemini, Vostok and Voskhod programs.

Jay Chladek
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posted 08-22-2007 12:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes they do have a Vostok reentry capsule. It was originally flown as an unmanned Cosmos module, but it is the same design as the manned ones (Russians still use them for some satellite research payloads). For display at the Cosmosphere, they put in a Vostok ejection seat and a dummy wearing a Gagarin style pressure suit.

The Voskhod on display is set up like a capsule in space, with silver film on the reentry pod and a full instrument unit attached to it. As a bonus, the airlock attached to the Voskhod is not a mockup, it apparently was the engineering and training backup to the one Leonov used on his spacewalk. So it is a rare piece of hardware to be sure.

mdmyer
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posted 08-22-2007 12:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If I remember right the flown Vostok was from an un-manned scientific flight. It is displayed as a manned flight show with the ejection seat shown coming out of the spaceship at the moment of ejection. The Voskhod is displayed as Voskhod 2. It has the inflatable airlock extended and "Leonov" is just emerging from the spaceship. That room is divided into an American Section and a Russian Section. The Voskhod with Leonov is on one side of the room and the carpet in that area is Red. Just on the other side of the room Mike Collins is seen spacewalking above the actual Gemini 10 spaceship. The carpet on that side of the room is blue. The Liberty Bell 7 is near the Gemini 10 and the Vostok and Voskhod set close together.

Did you see Guenter Wendt's signature inside the White Room? Wendt has actually signed that piece of history.

Jay Chladek
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posted 08-22-2007 10:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I saw that signature. On the same day I saw that, I also picked up a signed copy of Guenter's book "The Unbroken Chain" as they had it for sale in the giftshop that day.

Funny thing was about a year later I visited Titusville to check out a plastic model contest at the Elks lodge there as having a reason to go to Florida gave me an excuse to visit KSC to sort of get a lay of the place before attempting to visit for a launch when shuttle flights resumed (this was April of 2004, during the Columbia accident stand down). I didn't know why I did it at the time, but I packed my copy of book (even after reading it months before) into my luggage.

Well, on the Saturday of the model show, I spied Guenter talking with an aviation artist, and at that point it sort of dawned on me why I packed the book. So I rushed a couple blocks up the road to get the book from the hotel room, then came back and he was nice enough to personalize the book for me. So it now says "Always Obey the Pad Leader!" I've also got this nice picture on my wall with me and Guenter and the book between us that a friend of mine shot. Quite weird to have something like that happen admittedly and yet cool at the same time.

My friend (John Duncan) had a Saturn V model entered in the contest, so at my urging, he had Guenter sign the display base for it. Both of us chatted with Guenter for a few minutes and he is quite the character. It also amazed me to hear he had a hip replacement only 6 weeks earlier, yet he was up and walking (moving slowly admittedly, but still moving and smiling). That experience is something I will cherish since we were the only two guys talking with him about that stuff too. He wasn't being mobbed by lines of space geeks, so we could get more in depth with our conversation.

He didn't really reveal much more then what he had written in the book, but he was talking about how he had a discussion with John Young concerning the problems that needed to be fixed on the shuttle in the wake of STS-107 and NASA's trap of signing waivers to fly on something they didn't fix (such as foam shedding on the external tank).

Which reminds me (and brings this back on topic) the Cosmosphere has some great books for sale in the bookstore and they usually have a few signed copies on hand from time to time. The Wendt book was but one, but on other occassions they have had Stafford's and Cernan's bios on hand (and Story Musgrave's). They even had signed copies of Schirra and Buckbee's book "The Real Space Cowboys" on hand when I was there last summer. But I didn't pick it up since I already had an unsigned copy. So I was kicking myself a little when Wally passed away as I knew by then that all the signed copies were probably sold out at that point. But the Cosmosphere always gets some cool stuff in and I make sure I have a few spare dollars in my account when I go to visit it.

kyra
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posted 09-02-2007 07:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kyra   Click Here to Email kyra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, its T-4 days for my visit to the Kansas Cosmosphere. Like a real mission I'm checking and double checking everything and making sure things like spare batteries are on the "Stowage List"

I've timed things out that the Labor Day crowds will be home and most of the kids will be at school to get the quiet moments in the galleries mentioned earlier.

Thanks, Robert for the hint on the Apollo mock-up.

Choose2Go
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posted 09-04-2007 05:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Choose2Go   Click Here to Email Choose2Go     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just visited the Cosmosphere last Monday (a week ago) and had a great time with CEO Chris Orwoll and VP Jim Remar. I am busy now preparing updates and additions to the pertinent part of the Field Guide. When I was there, the hall between the MA-1 exhibit and the American-Soviet display was closed for new carpet installation. I had to retrace to the lobby and back down through the exit. It will probably be finished by the time you get there, but other areas may be getting the same treatment, so ask at the counter. One thing little mentioned is that must of the museum is below grade (downstairs). To get down there, the stairwell has a great collection of popular memoribalia from space real and fiction. And adorning the end of a stairwell is a beautiful stained glass honoring the three mission where astronauts perished, including some artifact of those missions (tiles from Challenger and Columbia, a fragment of pad from Apollo 1). In other words, although I am a certified hardware nut, I found a lot of other very cool and exciting things to round out my visit. Check the Field Guide as I post these updates.

kyra
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posted 09-04-2007 09:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kyra   Click Here to Email kyra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the update. The exact artifacts I will be photographing in detail are the Vostok 3KA-2 and Voskhod mockups. (For the dimensional/closeup details in the book I'm working on) After those tasks are completed, I'l be just another tourist with a camera. I'll even have the laptop along to upload/download the batches of 25 frames.

If any other cSer's are going to be there tomorrow afternoon (Wednesday) please be sure to say "Hi". I'll probably be the only one with a laptop.

FFrench
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posted 12-24-2007 03:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Kansas Cosmosphere is one of the vote choices for one of the eight wonders of Kansas - with voting closing on December 31. I went online and gave them my vote.

mmmoo
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posted 04-25-2008 06:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mmmoo   Click Here to Email mmmoo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Be sure to check out the refurbishment to the Apollo gallery, they just installed a 38 foot Moonpan of Harrison Schmitt using the lunar rake, alongside the Apollo 11 Moonrock, some fender pieces from the Apollo 17 LRV, and an original painting by Alan Bean.

More info here: Apollo Panorama at Kansas Cosmosphere

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-04-2008 09:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Associated Press: Kansas Cosmosphere Web site gets makeover
The Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center is giving its Web site a makeover.

The Hutchinson attraction says the new design will be more user-friendly, visually appealing and include more interactive aspects, such as blogs. The new site is expected to be launched July 18.

Marisa Honomichl, vice president of development at the Cosmosphere, said officials became aware of the need to replace the old Web site when users kept asking how to navigate it.

The new site features a section devoted to the museum showing the galleries and artifacts, and another explaining how to get involved at the Cosmosphere. There will also be a section on the Cosmosphere's restoration and replication of artifacts.

The center is launching a new blog on which students can communicate with NASA astronauts.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-13-2009 07:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hutchinson News: A new space race
The Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center is about to embark on a campaign to raise $1.5 million to $2.5 million over the next three years to bring its museum of space flight up to date, add more interactive exhibits, perform major maintenance on the building and put the museum in position to acquire new artifacts when NASA retires the space shuttle.

"It's very important for them to be ahead of the game and continue to be a cutting-edge, exciting place, the sort of place that inspires the passion and great thinking we associate with the space quest," said Kate Van Cantfort of the Hutchinson Community Foundation, which last month agreed to give the Cosmosphere $10,000 in local matching money toward a $137,000 federal grant.

Raising the remaining matching money to obtain the federal grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services is the Cosmosphere's immediate priority. The museum has until July to do that...

PowerCat
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From: Herington, KS, USA
Registered: Feb 2006

posted 12-14-2009 07:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for PowerCat   Click Here to Email PowerCat     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the update, Robert. I talked with Chris Orwoll last week and received a letter regarding the matching grant fundraiser. This is a really exciting time at that facility. 2010 plan on being even more exciting with the Apollo 13 reunion planned in April.

rjurek349
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Posts: 805
From:
Registered: Jan 2002

posted 12-14-2009 05:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for rjurek349   Click Here to Email rjurek349     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Cosmosphere is a wonderful resource, and I will be thrilled to support it as part of this campaign.

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