Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Commercial Space - Military Space
  Establishing the United States Space Force (Page 2)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 2 pages long:   1  2 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Establishing the United States Space Force
Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-20-2019 07:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
U.S. Space Force release
U.S. Space Force Fact Sheet

The U.S. Space Force (USSF) is a new branch of the Armed Forces. It was established on December 20, 2019 with enactment of the Fiscal Year 2020 National Defense Authorization Act and will be stood-up over the next 18 months. The USSF was established within the Department of the Air Force, meaning the Secretary of the Air Force has overall responsibility for the USSF, under the guidance and direction of the Secretary of Defense. Additionally, a four-star general known as the Chief of Space Operations (CSO) serves as the senior military member of the USSF. The CSO will be a full member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in December 2020.

Mission

The USSF is a military service that organizes, trains, and equips space forces in order to protect U.S. and allied interests in space and to provide space capabilities to the joint force. USSF responsibilities include developing military space professionals, acquiring military space systems, maturing the military doctrine for space power, and organizing space forces to present to our Combatant Commands.

Office of the Chief of Space Operations

The Chief of Space Operations (CSO), U.S. Space Force, serves as the principal uniformed adviser to the Secretary of the Air Force on Space Force activities. The CSO presides over the Office of the Chief of Space Operations, transmits plans and recommendations to the Secretary of the Air Force and acts as the Secretary's agent in carrying them out.

Space Force Organization

The USSF Headquarters and Office of the CSO are located in the Pentagon, just like the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force. This staff will focus on establishing a fully-functioning headquarters; preparing to execute the full scope of its organize, train, and equip responsibilities; and, in conjunction with the U.S. Air Force, developing a detailed plan to transfer forces into the U.S. Space Force. As a new military service, the U.S. Space Force will leverage the Department of the Air force for more than 75 percent of its enabling functions to significantly reduce cost and avoid duplication. The DAF will provide support functions that includes logistics, base operating support, civilian personnel management, business systems, IT support, audit agencies, etc.

People

Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) was redesignated as the USSF as an initial step in establishing the USSF. Military members that were assigned to AFSPC have now been assigned to the USSF but remain Airmen within the U.S. Air Force. Appropriate Air Force space-related personnel will transfer into the Space Force and become Space Force service members in a deliberate manner over the next 18 months. Over time, the DoD vision is to consolidate space missions from across the Armed Forces into the USSF, as appropriate and consistent with law.

Space Capabilities

The new, independent U.S. Space Force will maintain and enhance the competitive edge of the Department of Defense (DOD) in space while adapting to new strategic challenges.

Spacelift operations at the East and West Coast launch bases provide services, facilities and range safety control for the conduct of DOD, NASA and commercial space launches. Through the command and control of all DOD satellites, satellite operators provide force-multiplying effects -- continuous global coverage, low vulnerability and autonomous operations. Satellites provide essential in-theater secure communications, weather and navigational data for ground, air and fleet operations and threat warning.

Ground-based and space-based systems monitor ballistic missile launches around the world to guard against a surprise missile attack on North America. A global network of space surveillance sensors provide vital information on the location of satellites and space debris for the nation and the world. Maintaining space superiority is an emerging capability required to protect U.S. space assets from hostile attacks.

History

While the launch of the U.S. Space Force propels the United States into a new era, the Department of the Air Force has a proud history and long-standing record of providing the best space capabilities in the world.

On Sept. 1, 1982, the Air Force established AFSPC, with space operations as its primary mission. Cold War-era space operations focused on missile warning, launch operations, satellite control, space surveillance and command and control for national leadership. In 1991, Operation DESERT STORM validated the command's continuing focus on support to the warfighter through the use of GPS to enable the famous "Left Hook," proving the value of space-based capabilities.

In the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the president directed military action against Afghanistan and Iraq. AFSPC provided extensive space-based support to the U.S. Central Command commander in areas of communications; positioning, navigation and timing; meteorology; and warning. In 2005, the Air Force expanded its mission areas to include cyberspace. In concert with this, the Air Staff assigned responsibility for conducting cyberspace operations to AFSPC through Twenty-Fourth Air Force, which was activated in August 2009.

In July 2018, the Air Force cyber mission transferred to Air Combat Command, which generated the greatest capacity for an integrated Information Warfare capability within the Air Force. This move allowed AFSPC to focus on gaining and maintaining space superiority and outpacing our adversaries in the space domain.

With the enactment of the FY20 NDAA, AFSPC was re-designated the U.S. Space Force on Dec. 20, 2019, granting Title 10 authorization to the U.S. Space Force, established under the Department of the Air Force.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-23-2019 12:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Patrick Air Force Base, and with it the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, is now designated as a Space Force base and could see a name change in the coming months, reports Florida Today.
Other re-designated bases are Peterson, Schriever, and Buckley Air Force Bases in Colorado and Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

Brigadier General Douglass A. Schiess, Commander of the 45th Space Wing assured his fellow "sharks" — the nickname given to 45th Space Wing airmen — that the change should have no noticeable impact on space operations.

"The 45th Space Wing will continue to do its mission of assured access to space for the warfighters and our nation," he said in a video.

yeknom-ecaps
Member

Posts: 689
From: Northville MI USA
Registered: Aug 2005

posted 12-30-2019 12:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for yeknom-ecaps   Click Here to Email yeknom-ecaps     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With the creation of the new Space Force branch of the military there is a recommendation that many of the "space" bases around the country be renamed as space force bases.

What do you think about Cape Canaveral Air Force Station becoming United States Space Force Battle Base Canaveral? What names would you like to see used?

Editor's note: Threads merged.

Delta7
Member

Posts: 1577
From: Bluffton IN USA
Registered: Oct 2007

posted 12-30-2019 02:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Shepard Space Force Base has a nice ring to it.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-01-2020 10:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Space Operations Command release
14th Air Force redesignated as Space Operations Command

By order of Secretary of the Air Force Barbara M. Barrett, effective Dec. 20, Fourteenth Air Force [at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California] was officially redesignated as Space Operations Command.

Air Force military and civilian personnel previously assigned to the Fourteenth Air Force are now assigned to SPOC by virtue of the redesignation action.

The SPOC directly supports the U.S. Space Force's mission to protect the interests of the United States in space; deter aggression in, from and to space; and conduct space operations.

On Dec. 20, President Donald Trump signed the fiscal year 2020 National Defense Authorization Act, officially establishing the USSF as the sixth branch of the U.S. armed forces.

In accordance with a redesignation memorandum for record signed by Barrett, Maj. Gen. John E. Shaw, former Fourteenth Air Force commander, was redesignated as commander of Space Operations Command; in addition to Shaw's role as U.S. Space Command's Combined Force Space Component commander.

The SPOC provides space capabilities such as space domain awareness, space electronic warfare, satellite communications, missile warning, nuclear detonation detection, environmental monitoring, military intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance, navigation warfare, command and control, and positioning, navigation and timing, on behalf of the USSF for USSPACECOM and other combatant commands.

"It is an honor and privilege to lead the U.S. Space Force's Space Operations Command. Every day, all around the planet, people count on us to make a difference – to provide a space-enabled combat edge to the warfighters that keep our country, our allies, and our partners safe," Shaw said. "We will not let them down."

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-14-2020 09:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
U.S. Space Force release
Raymond sworn in as first Chief of Space Operations at White House event

Vice President Mike Pence Jan. 14 swore in Gen. John W. Raymond as the highest-ranking military leader of the newly created U.S. Space Force, adding a prominent White House ceremony that recognized the arrival of the nation's newest, separate branch of the military.

Raymond was formally designated the first Chief of Space Operations in a formal ceremony sponsored by the White House held at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building. It came less than a month after the Space Force, by law, became the sixth independent branch of the U.S. military and marking the first time since 1947 that a new branch of the military had been created.

"The first decision the president made after establishing the Space Force was deciding who should be its first leader," Pence said prior to delivering the oath of office to Raymond.

"I was around when the President made that decision and I can tell you, he never hesitated.

He knew right away there was no one more qualified or more prepared from a lifetime of service than Gen. Jay Raymond to serve as the first leader of the Space Force."

The Space Force was established Dec. 20 when President Trump signed into law the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). On that day he also appointed Raymond to lead the Space Force. Although directed by its own military leadership, the Space Force is nested within the Department of the Air Force.

Raymond noted the historic nature of the moment. "Not only is this historical, it's critical. That is not lost on me or the outstanding Americans who serve with me," he said.

The Space Force's overarching responsibility is training, equipping and organizing a cadre of space professionals who protect U.S. and allied interests in space while also providing space capabilities to the joint force. The Space Force's mandate includes developing military space professionals, acquiring military space systems, refining military doctrine for space power, and organizing space forces for use by combatant commands.

A major reason for creating the Space Force is the importance of space for both national security and everyday life. It is the backbone that allows for instant communication worldwide, precision navigation and global commerce. The U.S. Space Force will ensure the country's continued leadership in space, Raymond said. Equally important, he said, avoiding conflict in space.

"We want to deter that conflict from happening," he said. "The best way I know how to do that is through a position of strength."

Among those attending the ceremony were Defense Secretary Mark Esper, Air Force Secretary Barbara Barrett, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein, Gen. John Hyten, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Deputy Secretary of Defense David Norquist, Adm. Charles Ray, Vice-Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, Adm. Michael Gilday, Chief of Naval Operations and Chief, National Guard Bureau, Gen. Joseph Lengyel.

"We are moving forward with alacrity and in accordance with presidential direction, the law, and DOD guidance," said Secretary Barrett about the establishment of the new U.S. Space Force.

"Directing this effort is the incomparably-qualified leader, Gen. 'Jay' Raymond. As a career space officer, he's the perfect person to guide this lean, agile, vital Space Force."

Raymond was the natural choice for the job. He is currently the commander of the U.S. Space Command; the nation's unified command for space.

Before his new role, Raymond was the commander of Air Force Space Command which carried the nation's primary military focus on space, managing a constellation of satellites, developing policy and programs and training frontline space operators. Under law, Air Force Space Command was re-designated as the U.S. Space Force under the recently passed NDAA.

More broadly, the Space Force is responsible for maintaining the United States' space superiority, even as space becomes more crowded and contested. The (NDAA), which created the Space Force, also directs that the Space Force "shall provide the freedom of operation in, from, and to space, while providing prompt and sustained space operations."

dcfowler1
Member

Posts: 93
From: Eugene, OR
Registered: May 2006

posted 01-18-2020 12:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dcfowler1   Click Here to Email dcfowler1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No ranks or rank insignia yet, but the chief of space operations has a USSF uniform.

(And before the space camouflage jokes start, Congress mandated a common camouflage pattern for all of the services.)

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-24-2020 04:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From the Space Force, via Facebook:
The official U.S. Space Force seal was unveiled January 24, 2020 by the President.

The creation of the U.S. Space Force seal pays tribute to the newest Armed Service that organizes, trains, and equips space forces in order to protect U.S. and allied interests in space and to provide space capabilities to the joint force. The U.S. Space Force seal honors the Department of the Air Force's proud history and long-standing record of providing the best space capabilities in the world.

The delta symbol, the central design element in the seal, was first used as early as 1942 by the U.S. Army Air Forces; and was used in early Air Force space organization emblems dating back to 1961. Since then, the delta symbol has been a prominent feature in military space community emblems.

The new logo borrows elements from the prior Air Force Space Command logo, but also appears to draw inspiration from NASA's seal and insignia (and also bears some resemblance to the fictional Starfleet Command logo).

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 4641
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-24-2020 07:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Close resemblance to Star Trek is coincidental. The logo imports elements of Air Force Space Command's patch. The arrow is symbolic for Earth being both the origin and control point for all launches/satellites.

dcfowler1
Member

Posts: 93
From: Eugene, OR
Registered: May 2006

posted 01-25-2020 02:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dcfowler1   Click Here to Email dcfowler1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The first instance that I could find of military use of the delta emblem was the 36th Fighter Group in 1940, so a wee bit earlier than Trek.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-25-2020 08:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not to make this thread entirely about the logo, but the comparisons being drawn to the Starfleet logo are not about the use of the well-established delta symbol alone. It is the entire patch — the shape, the arrangement of the words in the border, the placement of the vector — the logo in its entirety, not the elements alone.

But setting that all aside, it does appear that the artist(s) did base the arrangement of the stars on the new logo from the NASA insignia.

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 4641
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-29-2020 09:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
First round of announcements for Space Force federal civilian positions have been posted...

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-07-2020 12:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Patrick Air Force Base and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station will become Patrick Space Force Base and Cape Canaveral Space Force Station within 30 days, 45th Space Wing Commander Brig. Gen. Douglas Schiess said during his "State of the Installation" briefing early Friday (Feb. 7), reports Florida Today.
"The names of the two bases will change," Schiess said, adding that Secretary of the Air Force Barbara Barrett and Space Force commander Gen. John Raymond will attend a local name change ceremony. "When that happens, we believe we'll probably be one of the first, if not the first, bases to do that."

Other than switching from "Air" to "Space," Schiess said the designations will retain their historic references.

"We're not going to change the Patrick part," he said of the beachside installation, which is named after Gen. Mason Patrick, first chief of the Air Force's predecessor. "And we would never think about changing the name of Cape Canaveral."

Schiess said he also anticipates a name change for the 45th Space Wing itself, though no final decisions have been made.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-25-2020 06:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Amid the coronavirus outbreak, Space Force officials have delayed renaming Patrick Air Force Base and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to "Patrick Space Force Base" and "Cape Canaveral Space Force Station."
No date has been set for the renaming, the 45th Space Wing told Florida Today Tuesday [March 24].

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-25-2020 06:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
United Launch Alliance (ULA) is preparing to launch an Atlas V rocket with AEHF-6, the first mission in support of the U.S. Space Force. The launch is scheduled for Thursday, March 26, 2020 with a two-hour launch window starting at 2:57 p.m. EDT (1857 GMT).

The Atlas V bears the Space Force insignia:

Cozmosis22
Member

Posts: 1036
From: Texas * Earth
Registered: Apr 2011

posted 03-26-2020 05:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cozmosis22     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bravo for a successful launch today! Message tweeted out a while ago from Gen. Jay Raymond, Chief of Space Operations, U.S. Space Force and commander of U.S. Space Command:
Congrats United Launch Alliance on today's successful launch of AEHF-6 — our first U.S. Space Force National Security Space Launch! Great teamwork by all partners, Lockheed Martin, Aerojet Rocketdyne, Air Force Space & Missile Systems Center and 45th Space Wing. On behalf of the U.S. Space Force and joint warfighters who depend on protected SATCOM... THANK YOU!

Jonnyed
Member

Posts: 432
From: Dumfries, VA, USA
Registered: Aug 2014

posted 04-19-2020 06:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jonnyed   Click Here to Email Jonnyed     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This weekend's Washington Post had a somewhat short but interesting article on the status of the U.S. Space Force and how it is starting up.
The U.S. Space Force — which has been dismissed variously as a fantasy, a presidential folly and a prospective Pentagon turf war — will finally launch for real on Saturday, as 86 newly minted space warriors graduate from the Air Force Academy.

The surprise in this space start-up, so far, is that most of the bad things that were predicted haven't happened. The turf battles have been minimal, and the politicians have mostly stayed quiet. While the world has been hunkered down with the novel coronavirus, the new space commander, Gen. John W. "Jay" Raymond, has been keeping his eyes on the heavens, literally and figuratively.

Kevmac
Member

Posts: 280
From: College Station, TX
Registered: Apr 2003

posted 04-19-2020 11:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kevmac   Click Here to Email Kevmac     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The US Space Force is in excellent hands. I spent several years working around Jay Raymond in the Air Force during our captain and major periods. He is one of the few officers in the military most capable of this extraordinary opportunity to stand up a new service with one of the most important missions of protecting the United States space assets and defending the high ground.

He is a great leader of troops who is smart, experienced across all space missions, and an outstanding gentleman. I'm excited to see where he takes this command during his tenure.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-06-2020 06:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
U.S. Space Force recruiting video
When we look to the stars, we see our clear purpose: to protect the hopes and dreams of America and exploration. The sky is not the limit. It's time for another giant leap.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-15-2020 05:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
U.S. Space Force Chief of Space Operations Gen. Jay Raymond and U.S. Space Force Senior Enlisted Advisor Chief Master Sergeant Roger Towberman presented the President with the U.S. Space Force Flag on Thursday, May 15, 2020, in the Oval Office of the White House.

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 4641
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-01-2020 08:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It seems for now at least SpOC with not work for STAR(fleet)COM. U.S. Space Force release:
USSF field command structure reduces command layers, focuses on space warfighter needs

The Department of the Air Force and the United States Space Force have finalized the new service's organizational structure for echelons below the headquarters, reflecting the newest branch of the armed forces' guiding principles of being a lean, agile and mission-focused organization.

The USSF field organization will consist of three echelons of command, where the Air Force currently is organized into five echelons. USSF's organizational structure will initially consolidate and align all organize, train and equip mission execution from former Air Force space-related units.

"This is the most significant restructuring of space units undertaken by the United States since the establishment of Air Force Space Command in 1982," said Secretary of the Air Force Barbara Barrett. "Innovation and efficiency are driving our mission as we position the Space Force to respond with agility to protect our nation's space capabilities and the American way of life."

In order of hierarchy, the USSF field echelons are named field commands, deltas and squadrons. There will be three field commands aligned with specific mission focuses: Space Operations Command, Space Systems Command, and Space Training and Readiness Command. SpOC and SSC will be led by three-star general officers, and STARCOM will be led by a two-star general.

Deltas will be O-6 led and will be organized around a specific function – operations, installation support, training, etc. Within the deltas will be squadrons focused on specific tactics. When the field command structure is fully implemented, it will eliminate one general officer echelon and one O-6 echelon of command. Functions formerly performed at the eliminated echelons will be realigned where appropriate within the USSF.

"This is an historic opportunity to launch the Space Force on the right trajectory to deliver the capabilities needed to ensure freedom of movement and deter aggression in, from and to space," said Gen. Jay Raymond, USSF chief of space operations. "How we organize the Space Force will have a lasting impact on our ability to respond with speed and agility to emerging threats in support of the National Defense Strategy and Space Strategy."

SpOC will be the primary force provider of space forces and capabilities for combatant commanders, coalition partners, the joint force and the nation. The staff and operations elements of USSF at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, which is also the former AFSPC, will become the headquarters SpOC. There is an existing unit at Vandenberg AFB, California, named Space Operations Command, which will be renamed upon activation of the field command SpOC.

SSC will be responsible for developing, acquiring, and fielding lethal and resilient space capabilities for warfighters. Additionally, SSC will be responsible for launch, developmental testing, on-orbit checkout, and sustainment and maintenance of USSF space systems, as well as oversight of USSF science and technology activities. Acquisition and development organizations to include the Space and Missile Systems Center, the Commercial Satellite Communications Office, and program offices of space systems transferring to USSF from other DoD organizations will form the building blocks of the new command, which will be built out in the months to come.

STARCOM will train and educate space professionals, and develop combat-ready space forces to address the challenges of the warfighting domain of space. Complete stand up of STARCOM is scheduled for 2021. In the interim, a provisional Space Training and Readiness Delta, led by an O-6, will be established in July at Peterson AFB. This unit will serve as the parent organization for a number of education, training, and operational test and evaluation units transferring to the Space Force in summer 2020.

The next activities to stand up USSF field organizations include activation of SpOC, SSC and deltas beginning later in summer.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-22-2020 03:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The new U.S. Space Force logo (not be confused with the seal pictured upthread):
Today we are proud to showcase the Space Force logo to the world.

"Semper Supra" (Always Above) is our official motto and it represents our role in establishing, maintaining, and preserving U.S. freedom of operations in the space domain.

The delta was first used in space organizations as early as 1961 and has inspired generations of space professionals. In the center of the delta is the star Polaris, which symbolizes how the core values guide the Space Force mission.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-24-2020 05:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
U.S. Space Force release
Space Force begins transition into field organizational structure

During a virtual pre-recorded ceremony today [July 24], the U.S. Space Force executed numerous organization changes in its first realignment actions to transition from the previous Air Force major command structure into the new service's flatter field organization structure announced June 30.

When fully implemented, the field organization will consist of three echelons of command named field command, delta or garrison depending on focus, and squadron, eliminating one general officer echelon and one O-6 echelon of command.

"Today we take action, an important and significant step, towards the development of a 21st century service purpose-built to achieve speed, agility, and unity of effort," said Gen. John "Jay" Raymond, chief of space operations, in the recorded video. "This ceremony highlights the most significant restructure of space units since the establishment of the Air Force Space Command in 1982."

In the ceremony, the Space Force inactivated three space wings and eight lower echelon commands, and in place activated Space Training and Readiness Delta Provisional, two garrison commands and eight mission deltas.

"The United States Space Force is being structured to organize, train, and equip a lean and agile force spreading the responsibilities across the future units to more quickly enable space operators to protect and defend America's interests in space," said Col. Suzy Streeter, the narrator for the ceremony.

STAR Delta Provisional will serve as the precursor organization to the eventual Space Training and Readiness Command field command, known as STARCOM. STARCOM will build lethality by developing combat-ready space forces and space warfighting capabilities in order to innovate and dominate in all domains – air, land, sea, space and cyberspace. STAR Delta Provisional will serve as the interim parent organization for a number of education, training, and operational test and evaluation units.

"Today's activation of STAR Delta is a crucial first step in the command taking its place at the forefront of delivering a ready space force that is prepared to meet the challenges of defending the nation's interests in space" said Col. Pete Flores, commander, STAR Delta.

The other two field commands will be Space Operations Command and Space Systems Command. SpOC will be responsible for organizing, training, and equipping fielded space forces who will execute space warfighting operations for combatant commanders, coalition partners, the joint force, and the nation. SSC will be responsible for developing, acquiring, fielding, and sustaining lethal and resilient space capabilities for warfighters.

As space operations are predominantly conducted by non-expeditionary forces, the Space Force's new field structure effectively organizes space forces to fight in place within mission deltas and aligns installation support functions within garrisons. Air Force expertise, units and personnel will execute installation support functions under the command of the O-6 garrison commander through Air Force mission support groups, medical groups, and special staff.

Facilitating the transition to the two garrison commands established today, the 21st Space Wing, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, and the 50th Space Wing, Schriever AFB, Colorado, inactivated, and the Peterson-Schriever Garrison activated. The Peterson-Schriever Garrison will be headquartered at Peterson AFB and will also be responsible for Thule Air Base, Greenland; Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station, Colorado; Kaena Point AFS, Hawaii and New Boston AFS, New Hampshire. This Garrison will support 16 additional mission locations around the world.

Additionally, the 460th Space Wing, Buckley AFB, Colorado, was inactivated, and the Buckley Garrison was activated. The garrison will be responsible for installation support to Cape Cod AFS, Massachusetts; Cavalier AFS, North Dakota; Clear AFS, Alaska, and will support 10 additional mission locations around the world.

Following the garrison activations, the Space Force established eight mission deltas. A space mission delta may be categorized as operational, support or specialized as determined by the collection of its subordinate units. Space deltas are designed to focus on executing complex missions to empower rapid decision making as an integral part of joint operations.

"Mission deltas, are similar to Army Combat Teams or Air Force Expeditionary Wings in that they enable laser focus on specific mission sets that pull together unique capabilities and highly-trained warfighters to deliver combat effects," said Lt. Gen. David "DT" Thompson, vice commander, U.S. Space Force.

Mission delta activations and affiliated inactivations accomplished are:

  • Activated Space Delta 2 (Space Domain Awareness)
    Inactivated 21st Operations Group at Peterson AFB

  • Activated Space Delta 3 (Space Electronic Warfare)
    Inactivated 721st Operations Group at Peterson AFB

  • Activated Space Delta 4 (Missile Warning)
    Inactivated 460th Operations Group at Buckley AFB

  • Activated Space Delta 5 (Command and Control)
    Inactivated 614th Air Operations Center at Vandenberg AFB, California

  • Activated Space Delta 6 (Cyberspace Operations)
    Inactivated 50th Network Operations Group at Schriever AFB

  • Activated Space Delta 7 (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) in partnership with the 544th Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Group at Peterson AFB

  • Activated Space Delta 8 (Satellite Communications/Navigation Warfare)
    Inactivated 50th Operations Group at Schriever AFB

  • Activated Space Delta 9 (Orbital Warfare)
    Inactivated 750th Operations Group at Schriever AFB
Space Force Senior Enlisted Advisor Chief Master Sgt. Roger A. Towberman had words of advice for these new command teams as they take on the role of not only leading these new units, but also unleashing the potential within space professionals to build the Space Force for tomorrow.

"We're moving forward, and we are encouraging and embracing the ideas of our men and women in uniform to build a modern and digital Space Force," Towberman said. "To our newest delta commanders and senior enlisted leaders, you have the unique opportunity to inspire and lead space professionals into a new era, ripe with opportunity."

Finally, concurrent to today's ceremony, some space-related units were re-aligned to the Space Force. These units until now belonged to other Air Force major commands rather than the former Air Force Space Command, meaning they were not assigned to USSF upon establishment of the new service.

Units realigned from the Air Force to the Space Force effective today include:

  • National Security Space Institute
  • U.S. Air Force Warfare Center Detachment 1
  • 705th Combat Training Squadron Operating Location Alpha
  • 25th Space Range Squadron
  • 527th Space Aggressor Squadron
As these units and mission sets realign to the Space Force, military and civilian personnel in those units will also be assigned to the service. This realignment will not result in any immediate changes to personnel assignment or physical location.

Additional unit transfers will be announced as they are finalized.

Raymond closed the ceremony highlighting the new commanders' opportunity to integrate space power into the strategic environment, building a comprehensive military advantage in space.

"Your charge is simple – to lead, inspire, and prepare our space forces to win in an era of contested space operations," said Raymond. "The joint force is counting on you to be bold and agile in the face of threats and to deliver war-winning capabilities to our forces, our allies, and our partners operating around the earth. We know you will guarantee the Space Force is always above the next challenge."

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-18-2020 07:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The X-37B spaceplane program will remain under Air Force management for the foreseeable future, and won't join other Pentagon space programs turned over to the Space Force after the establishment of the new service branch last year, reports Spaceflight Now.
Randy Walden, director and program executive officer for the Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office, said Aug. 13 in a virtual forum hosted by the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies that his office will remain in charge of the X-37B program.

A Space Rapid Capabilities Office headquartered at Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico was established in 2018 to replace the military's Operationally Responsive Space, or ORS, program. Most of Space RCO's efforts are classified.

Walden said the Air Force RCO will retain the X-37B program, but added his office will "continue the collaboration" with Space RCO and the U.S. Space Force.

"Right now, we plan on keeping that," Walden said, referring to the X-37B program. "There's a lot of interest in reusable space vehicles right now. We've gained a lot of information in the decade we've been operating that system, and I think it's provided unique and relevant insight into some of the newer technologies that would actually go to space and inform how they would build those systems. So we're going to continue doing that."

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-28-2020 10:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
William Shatner wants to know: What the heck is wrong with you, Space Force?
To the very esteemed members of Space Force and other grand poohbahs of the United States government agencies who may have a say in this, I have one question for you:

What the heck is wrong with you?

I'm talking about the ranks of the Space Force!

What are you doing to us? There was no Colonel Kirk; not even in the mirror universe (which is what 2020 feels like at times).

Do you know your entertainment space history?

Let me show you what I mean. Throughout entertainment history, which precedes actual space flight history by decades, we had captains...

"Star Trek" has borrowed so much of its iconic rank symbols from the U.S. military and NASA. When you unveiled the Space Force logo, many immediately saw it as an homage to "Star Trek" (even though our Delta was an homage to the previous military space insignias). Why not borrow back from "Star Trek" and adopt our ranks as well? We took them from the Navy for good reason, even though Gene Roddenberry was a veteran of the U.S. Army Air Corps. They made better sense when talking about a (space) ship.

So wrapping this up, I'm going to say that if you want the public to believe in heroes, that you should adopt the Navy ranks as they are the ones the public is most used to being heroes.

So please reconsider and name the Space Force ranks after the U.S. Navy.

ejectr
Member

Posts: 1791
From: Killingly, CT
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 08-28-2020 10:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Seconded...

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 4641
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-28-2020 02:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Go Navy!

Fra Mauro
Member

Posts: 1679
From: Bethpage, N.Y.
Registered: Jul 2002

posted 08-28-2020 02:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I find William Shatner to be very amusing, in a positive way.

dcfowler1
Member

Posts: 93
From: Eugene, OR
Registered: May 2006

posted 08-28-2020 10:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dcfowler1   Click Here to Email dcfowler1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Prior to Congress stepping in, the internal proposal was to mostly keep USAF ranks, and change airmen ranks to specialist.

Now, my sense is that it is more likely than not that naval ranks will be required to be adopted.

Jonnyed
Member

Posts: 432
From: Dumfries, VA, USA
Registered: Aug 2014

posted 08-29-2020 07:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jonnyed   Click Here to Email Jonnyed     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sailing the great ocean of space!

As a former US Navy submarine officer, I could not agree more with the imagery of a ship.

The question: Is the Space Force viewing itself as an always terrestrial-based operation fighting in the "battlefield" of near-Earth space (Army/Air Force ranks) or a spacefaring operation (Navy ranks)?

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 4641
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-29-2020 08:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ultimately the latter is inevitable, the AO will progressively grow with human expansion into and increased exploitation of the domain.

oly
Member

Posts: 1099
From: Perth, Western Australia
Registered: Apr 2015

posted 08-29-2020 10:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't get why people stress about which system of rank is used. The majority of astronauts are drawn from outside one specific arm of the defense force, including civilian life, and the majority of people who do serve within the Space Force will never be in a position whereby outsiders will ever recognize their rank.

The people inside Space Force will adopt pride of their own world, and as the Space Force functions from pre-existing Air Force infrastructure using staff drawn predominantly from the Air Force, their world is not much different from before, and their chain of command easily identifiable by them. New recruits will become assimilated with whatever rank system is set out.

As in the world of airlines, the pilot in command is identified as the captain, as is the person in command of a small pleasure boat. There is no reason why the person in command of a spacecraft can't be identified as the captain, although NASA has used the title of commander in their nomenclature for some time (Chris Cassidy is the current ISS commander) and used mission specialist among others to identify crew positions within a mission.

Referring back to airline operations, crew hierarchy identified by ships officer ranks originated during the times when airlines used flying boats and pilots wore uniforms resembling maritime officers' uniforms such as those used by cruise ship and ocean liner crews. Pan Am developed the idea and called their aircraft clippers. It was a way to make the aircrew appear more sophisticated than the clothing worn by barnstormers and air mail pilots.

Gaining captaincy is not necessarily a reference to seniority of rank, just ask any airline captain of a small regional turboprop when the crew of a widebody walk into the bar.

Film and television perpetuated the idea of spacecraft crewed by people use naval ranks and gave us visual images of the captain at the helm of a spaceship. Yes, many of the early space program missions were crewed by people drawn from the military who did hold military rank, but none of them used their rank identification during a space flight. Even the all Navy crew of Apollo 12 used the commander, command module pilot, lunar module pilot nomenclature, it was the media who referred to each crew member by their military rank.

Neil Armstrong held military rank, but had left the military to join NASA as a civilian. His position as commander of the Apollo 11 mission made no reference to naval rank, he was the pilot in command for the spacecraft he piloted. Surely this pioneering position must hold some historical significance in Shatner's hierarchical list.

If ever the Navy was to have a spacecraft crewed by an all Navy crew undertaking a naval mission on behalf of naval orders, then it would be acceptable to use naval rank to differentiate various crew members. Somehow chief of the boat does not sit well with me as a spacecraft crew position. And an all Army crew being led by a captain would probably be questionable, especially by anyone above the rank of major.

The way that the spaceflight industry is going, it is probable that crew positions will follow airline systems because space tourism will probably demand someone serving drinks and snacks, so the cabin attendant/flight attendant position may become a thing and the pilot may become a redundant title on autonomous spacecraft. Then there is the kids club to consider, where everyone gets a plastic astronaut pin and is called captain.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 44682
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-22-2020 09:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA, US Space Force Establish Foundation for Broad Collaboration

While advancing plans for unprecedented lunar exploration under the Artemis program, NASA also is building on a longstanding partnership with the Department of Defense with a new memorandum of understanding announced today by NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and U.S. Space Force (USSF) Chief of Space Operations Gen. John "Jay" Raymond.

The agreement, discussed during a Sept. 22 Mitchell Institute virtual event, commits the two organizations to broad collaboration in areas including human spaceflight, U.S. space policy, space transportation, standards and best practices for safe operations in space, scientific research, and planetary defense.

"NASA's partnerships are vital to ensuring America continues to lead the world in the peaceful uses of outer space," Bridenstine said. "This agreement with the U.S. Space Force reaffirms and continues our rich legacy of collaboration with the Defense Department and provides a critical foundation to investigate areas of mutual interest for our distinct civil and defense roles in space."

The memorandum replaces an agreement signed 14 years ago between NASA and the U.S. Air Force Space Command, under which the two organizations exchanged research and development information, sought to reduce duplication of system development, and collaborated in the long-term planning of each organization's space roadmaps.

"NASA and the military share a long history dating back to the late 1950s; there is power in our partnership," Raymond said. "A secure, stable, and accessible space domain underpins our nation's security, prosperity and scientific achievement. Space Force looks forward to future collaboration, as NASA pushes farther into the universe for the benefit of all."

Freedom of action in space provides NASA and allied-nation space agencies the ability to explore and discover, and will enable America's return to the Moon and subsequent exploration of Mars. The USSF will secure the peaceful use of space, free for any who seek to expand their understanding of the universe, by organizing, training and equipping forces to protect U.S. and allied interests in space.

SpaceCadet1983
Member

Posts: 284
From: Pacific NW, United States
Registered: May 2012

posted 09-22-2020 03:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceCadet1983   Click Here to Email SpaceCadet1983     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Official HQ US Space Force patch worn by newly sworn-in personnel.


This topic is 2 pages long:   1  2 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 2020 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement