Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Satellites - Robotic Probes
  Curiosity to Mars: Viewing, questions, comments (Page 3)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 5 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Curiosity to Mars: Viewing, questions, comments
Blackarrow
Member

Posts: 2182
From: Belfast, United Kingdom
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 08-06-2012 05:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
On the evening before the landing, at dinner with my wife on holiday on Jersey (Channel Islands, not NJ!) I confessed that I feared that Curiosity would crash, "but if makes it down safely, we'll celebrate with champagne tomorrow night."

Well, it was an expensive promise, but very enjoyable!

Cheers! (Hic!)

sev8n
Member

Posts: 91
From: Dallas TX USA
Registered: Jul 2012

posted 08-06-2012 06:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for sev8n     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Oreo paid tribute to Curiosity's landing...
I can't quite make out the Morse-code in the tracks...

Scott
Member

Posts: 3296
From: Houston, TX
Registered: May 2001

posted 08-06-2012 06:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott   Click Here to Email Scott     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
They have released the video of the landing. Wow. At the end of it you can actually see the dust being kicked up by the rockets.

Jay Chladek
Member

Posts: 2268
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 08-06-2012 10:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am having a "Whoa" moment right now. That is a rather cool stop motion video, almost as iconic as the Apollo 11 LM descent and landing footage.

Fra Mauro
Member

Posts: 1099
From: Bethpage, N.Y.
Registered: Jul 2002

posted 08-07-2012 11:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bravo to to JPL and to NASA!!!

What is the reaction of the newspapers in your town? The Wall Street Journal had a front page article and USA today had a nice piece. However, each had a tinge of "is NASA still necessary?" to it.

Blackarrow
Member

Posts: 2182
From: Belfast, United Kingdom
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 08-07-2012 12:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Nothing short of nuclear war is going to shift the Olympics off the British front pages, but the Times today has a decent two-page spread (pages 14 and 15) covering the landing.

I do think it a PR problem that we still haven't seen any high resolution images. I suspect many people who lack detailed knowledge about Curiosity but are broadly sympathetic might be tempted to think that the low-res thumbnails represent poor value for $2.5 billion. By this stage, Viking, Mars Pathfinder, Spirit, Opportunity and Phoenix had produced far better images. I understand the reasons, but I don't need to be convinced. Others do.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29397
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-07-2012 12:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
First color image of landscape (taken by MAHLI, though with dusty dust cover still attached) released...

And Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has spotted Curiosity on the surface...

Fezman92
Member

Posts: 1030
From: New Jersey, USA
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 08-07-2012 01:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fezman92   Click Here to Email Fezman92     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Fra Mauro:
What is the reaction of the newspapers in your town?
Back of the news section, page 'A7.' Then again this newspaper has never been big on science at all.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29397
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-07-2012 01:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Keep in the mind the placement may have also had to do with the hour it was happening. On the east coast, the landing was at 1:31 a.m. — and the press conference was an hour later.

Many papers would have already locked their front page/section to go to print...

Gonzo
Member

Posts: 502
From: Lansing, MI, USA
Registered: Mar 2012

posted 08-07-2012 01:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gonzo   Click Here to Email Gonzo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Fezman92:
Then again this newspaper has never been big on science at all.
That's because science news doesn't sell.

Why? Because most people don't understand/appreciate what it can/has done for us. Just this morning in my weekly staff meeting (my office has 6 people) was asked, "Why did we go to the moon anyway? Why did we spend $2B+ on going to Mars? What will we ever get from it? What's the purpose of NASA anyway? We certainly don't get anything from it. OK, so we got velcro. Big deal. What else?" At which point my tongue started bleeding from me biting it to keep from starting an argument with them.

Sad, but true.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29397
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-07-2012 01:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My experience (and based on discussions with numerous news outlets' editors) is that it's not about science and it's not about a lack of appreciation for the space program. It's about pretty pictures.

The New York Times (for example) consistently puts Hubble Space Telescope images on its front page because the images sell papers. Had it been technically possible to transmit a high resolution color panorama moments after landing, nearly every newspaper in the world would have run with it — because pictures sell papers, not words (ironically).

Aztecdoug
Member

Posts: 1340
From: Huntington Beach
Registered: Feb 2000

posted 08-07-2012 02:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Aztecdoug   Click Here to Email Aztecdoug     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Looks like NASA flight director Bobak Ferdowsi, aka, Mohawk Guy, is generating quite a positive stir. I even saw a bit about him on the national news last night. One blogger even wrote that he was adorkable...

I understand he does something different with his hair for each mission? I guess Kranz had his vest so what the heck.

If it helps bring more fans and money to what JPL does I say you gotta go with it. Good for them, it is fine by me.

Adorkable... heh heh heh

Fra Mauro
Member

Posts: 1099
From: Bethpage, N.Y.
Registered: Jul 2002

posted 08-07-2012 02:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Many papers would have already locked their front page/section to go to print...
Because of the hour of the landing, I didn't expect anything in the papers until Tuesday. If your newspaper wrote a good story about Curiosity, you should give them positive feedback. We have to let them know that some of their readers want to read something meaningful.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29397
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-07-2012 02:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Aztecdoug:
I understand he does something different with his hair for each mission? I guess Kranz had his vest so what the heck.
Indeed. Here's what they told us during a pre-landing press conference:
His tradition — and he's had this tradition through all of our system tests and launch and big events during cruise — he basically comes up with a unique hair style every time. He's very well known for this.

Before EDL [entry, descent and landing], actually a few months ago, we actually had a flight team vote what his hair style should be and the flight team, the majority ruled on "Stars and Stripes..."

I hear he's going to be a guest on National Public Radio's "Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!"

Fezman92
Member

Posts: 1030
From: New Jersey, USA
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 08-07-2012 04:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fezman92   Click Here to Email Fezman92     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I head that he is also going to do a Q&A on Reddit. When I find out when that is going to happen I will join it.

Rick Boos
Member

Posts: 845
From: Celina,Ohio U.S.A.
Registered: Feb 2000

posted 08-07-2012 05:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Boos   Click Here to Email Rick Boos     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Reference the above photo showing the sky crane, back shell, and heat shield, are they within Gale crater? If so, any chance that Curiosity will drive over to them like Spirit and or Opportunity did?

I think it would be worth while in that you could examine the soil beneath the surface, not to mention it would provide some interesting photos.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29397
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-07-2012 05:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
All the components are inside Gale Crater, however there are no plans for Curiosity to visit them. The rover's full focus, once mobile, is going to be the layers of rock stacked alongside Mount Sharp.

bwhite1976
Member

Posts: 188
From: belleville, IL USA
Registered: Jun 2011

posted 08-07-2012 08:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bwhite1976   Click Here to Email bwhite1976     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rick Boos:
If so, any chance that Curiosity will drive over to them like Spirit and or Opportunity did?
I was thinking the same thing. Would love to see a close up pic of the sky crane as it looks like it took quite a tumble when it hit the ground. Understandably though, this mission is about the science so it makes perfect sense not to visit the components as I am sure that would equate to millions of dollars of man hours and time. Although, from an engineering standpoint, it would seem there would be some information gleaned from going over and taking a look.

davidcwagner
Member

Posts: 536
From: Albuquerque, New Mexico
Registered: Jan 2003

posted 08-07-2012 08:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for davidcwagner   Click Here to Email davidcwagner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There is an interesting triple point almost due east of Curiosity where 3 dissimilar terrains meet (assume north at top). It is even closer than the backshell to the west.

My bet for 1st target of Curiosity.

JPSastro
Member

Posts: 142
From: Tucson, Arizona
Registered: Jan 2009

posted 08-07-2012 09:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JPSastro   Click Here to Email JPSastro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think that they would want to stay away from the sky crane remains, since that area would be contaminated with fuel residue and such, putting the sensor packages at risk. Could really skew results in the long term. Just a thought.

Cozmosis22
Member

Posts: 349
From: Texas * Earth
Registered: Apr 2011

posted 08-07-2012 10:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cozmosis22     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Apparently the back shell and parachute, and the sky crane ended up about a quarter mile away downstream from Curiosity; while the heat shield is about a half a mile upstream. At today's news conference they confirmed that the rover will not get anywhere close to those components for the reasons mentioned here previously. They did confirm that they were contemplating looking at the sky crane from afar.

Scott
Member

Posts: 3296
From: Houston, TX
Registered: May 2001

posted 08-08-2012 09:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott   Click Here to Email Scott     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We've already seen a low-resolution movie clip of Curiosity's descent, as recorded by the Mars Descent Imager. This is the first high-resolution frame to be sent down.

Eventually, hundreds of frames will be transmitted to Earth and combined to create a high-res movie showing the rover's-eye view of Curiosity's touchdown on the Red Planet.

cspg
Member

Posts: 4543
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 08-08-2012 02:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There are mountains on Mars!?!?

dogcrew5369
Member

Posts: 594
From: Statesville, NC
Registered: Mar 2009

posted 08-08-2012 02:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dogcrew5369   Click Here to Email dogcrew5369     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My first thought was they look like my neighborly Blue Ridge Mountains here in North Carolina. Awesome view just without the trees.

tegwilym
Member

Posts: 2293
From: Renton, WA USA
Registered: Jan 2000

posted 08-08-2012 03:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Speaking of public awareness, I was thrilled at work the other day when I saw the parachute photo and had to show some coworkers. They looked at it like a deer in the headlights look, and just said "oh, I did here something about Mars". *sigh*

Now let me find my napkin to wipe the drool from my chin after seeing those mountains in the distance. Such amazing stuff, I don't care what anyone says!

Fezman92
Member

Posts: 1030
From: New Jersey, USA
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 08-08-2012 04:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fezman92   Click Here to Email Fezman92     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
There are mountains on Mars!?!?
As long as there aren't any Ice Warriors living over there I am fine.

Gonzo
Member

Posts: 502
From: Lansing, MI, USA
Registered: Mar 2012

posted 08-08-2012 07:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gonzo   Click Here to Email Gonzo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Or Tharks!

I only hope NASA plays this up for all they can get out of it. While my coworkers don't appreciate what it means, I haven't been this excited since the launch of the first shuttle!

Go NASA!!!!!

Philip
Member

Posts: 4945
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 08-09-2012 08:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
...because pictures sell papers, not words (ironically).
O.K. Robert, pictures and papers... we all know a good picture says more than a thousand words.

Jay Chladek
Member

Posts: 2268
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 08-09-2012 08:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The sky crane crash site won't be visited since it is now essentially a toxic hydrazine waste dump. I was also wondering why the rover is going to take a month before it starts driving, but I have to wonder if there were similar concerns from the rocket exhaust plumes. So, wait a month to test the systems and let any potential residue drop to safe levels... just in case (all while making sure to do a thorough checkout and calibration of the onboard systems).

Jim Behling
Member

Posts: 665
From: Cape Canaveral, FL
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 08-09-2012 08:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Chladek:
The sky crane crash site won't be visited since it is now essentially a toxic hydrazine waste dump.
Ahem. "Descent stage" crash site. Sky crane is the name of the maneuver, the hardware is the descent stage.

The reason for the wait really doesn't have to do with exhaust residuals, but checkout and to do a complete photo survey of the area. MER took a few weeks before they moved.

Saturn V
Member

Posts: 176
From: Golden, Colorado, USA
Registered: Nov 2006

posted 08-09-2012 11:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Saturn V     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
There are mountains on Mars!?!?
For the picture of the mountain range (which is really cool by the way), what direction is the camera looking? I want to get some kind of orientation here so I can better understand what's going on.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29397
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-09-2012 11:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As the caption explains, those really aren't mountains in the classical sense, but rather the rim of Gale Crater...
The topography of the rim is very mountainous due to erosion.
The view in this panorama is of the north Gale Crater rim.

Saturn V
Member

Posts: 176
From: Golden, Colorado, USA
Registered: Nov 2006

posted 08-09-2012 11:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Saturn V     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you Robert. Then that means the numbers at the bottom of the picture are a compass heading although I do not know if Mars has a magnetic field to orient a compass.

Good information for future reference.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29397
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-09-2012 01:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For additional context, as discussed during today's media briefing, the rim's "mountains" are only about 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) higher than the surface on which Curiosity sits.

By comparison, Mount Sharp, at the center of Gale Crater, is 3.4 miles (5.5 kilometers) high.

canyon42
Member

Posts: 191
From: Ohio
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 08-09-2012 03:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The rim surface may not be as high above Curiosity as the central peak, but 1.2 miles is still pretty impressive — that's over 7,000 feet. Close to the same as standing in the valley of Jackson Hole and looking up at the top of the Grand Tetons.

Cozmosis22
Member

Posts: 349
From: Texas * Earth
Registered: Apr 2011

posted 08-09-2012 03:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cozmosis22     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Behling:
Sky crane is the name of the maneuver, the hardware is the descent stage.
No use to keep trying to make that distinction since the JPL website (photo above) even labels the descent stage remains as "Sky crane".

canyon42
Member

Posts: 191
From: Ohio
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 08-09-2012 03:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One thing that really caught my eye about the photo from above the site was how large the dark "ring" around Curiosity is. Those rockets really stirred things up, unless that's another coincidental site feature.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29397
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-09-2012 03:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The mission team has said they aren't sure yet whether the discoloration of the surrounding soil is contamination from the retrorockets or bedrock being exposed.

They said today there is an eagerness among the team to use the ChemCam laser to analyze the chemical makeup of the disturbed areas.

DChudwin
Member

Posts: 1024
From: Lincolnshire IL USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 08-09-2012 09:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DChudwin   Click Here to Email DChudwin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As images start coming back from Curiosity, a "must see" website is Emily Lakdawalla's blog. She is a planetary geologist associated with the Planetary Society who is an expert in image processing. She has posted today a colorized version of part of the Navcam panorama which was released earlier. Be sure to check out her blog on a regular basis.

DChudwin
Member

Posts: 1024
From: Lincolnshire IL USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 08-10-2012 05:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DChudwin   Click Here to Email DChudwin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA's Mars Science Laboratory team at JPL is posting raw images of Mars from Curiosity's cameras, including the first shots from the high-resolution Mastcams. This is an important step in transparency and engaging the public. Before this, raw images have been available on-line for some NASA spacecraft (Cassini) but not others (Dawn). Hat tip to NASA and JPL for their openness.


This topic is 5 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2014 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement