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  Curiosity on Mars: Questions and comments (Page 5)

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Author Topic:   Curiosity on Mars: Questions and comments
lspooz
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Posts: 353
From: Greensboro, NC USA
Registered: Aug 2012

posted 04-10-2014 04:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lspooz   Click Here to Email lspooz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Solarplexus:
Images taken by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover on April 2 and April 3, 2014 include bright spots...
Surely there are some Arthur C Clarke fans here...

I could see just enough to tantalize me

Gonzo
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Posts: 596
From: Lansing, MI, USA
Registered: Mar 2012

posted 04-10-2014 04:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gonzo   Click Here to Email Gonzo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Monoliths reflected NO light at all...

I'd also add, what are the tracks? The rover would leave tracks in pairs!

Solarplexus
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Posts: 99
From: Norway
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posted 04-10-2014 05:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Solarplexus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am so disappointed.
Rather than emanating from an underground Martian disco, the bright spots are probably caused by cosmic rays colliding with the rover's camera or by glinting rocks reflecting the Martian sunlight, said NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Justin Maki, lead imaging scientist for the Curiosity team.
But the tracks looks promising.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-24-2014 05:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Curiosity has completed its first Martian year (687 Earth days):

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 08-05-2016 01:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA video
NASA's Curiosity rover celebrates its Martian birthday on August 5 (PDT), the day that it landed on Mars. In honor of this special ocassion, engineers at Goddard Space Flight Center are using the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument to "sing" Happy Birthday to Curiosity.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 06-20-2017 05:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Mars Orbiter Views Rover Climbing Mount Sharp

Using the most powerful telescope ever sent to Mars, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter caught a view of the Curiosity rover this month amid rocky mountainside terrain.

The car-size rover, climbing up lower Mount Sharp toward its next destination, appears as a blue dab against a background of tan rocks and dark sand in the enhanced-color image from the orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. The exaggerated color, showing differences in Mars surface materials, makes Curiosity appear bluer than it really looks.

The image was taken on June 5, 2017, two months before the fifth anniversary of Curiosity's landing near Mount Sharp on Aug. 5 PDT (Aug. 6, 2017, EDT and Universal Time).

When the image was taken, Curiosity was partway between its investigation of active sand dunes lower on Mount Sharp, and "Vera Rubin Ridge," a destination uphill where the rover team intends to examine outcrops where hematite has been identified from Mars orbit.

The rover's location that day is shown here as the point labeled 1717. Images taken that day by Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam) are here.

denali414
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Posts: 291
From: Raleigh, NC USA
Registered: Aug 2017

posted 01-28-2018 06:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for denali414   Click Here to Email denali414     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Many probably know, but I hadn't heard the story and looked and couldn't find it here.

I was at a conference and a JPL worker told the story of the treads for the Mars rover initially had stamped "JPL" in the aluminum wheels, so could tell distance on the rotation and would leave JPL on the surface as moved. That plan was nixed, and instead they put square holes for the sighting, but didn't tell anyone that the holes were actually Morse code for "JPL."

So Curiosity is still leaving a trail of JPL on the surface.

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 40077
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-28-2018 06:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That is a great detail about Curiosity, isn't it? Right up there the 1909 penny mounted on its calibration target.
quote:
Originally posted by denali414:
...couldn't find it here.
See this 2012 article: NASA's Mars rover Curiosity leaves coded tracks on first test drive.

LM-12
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Posts: 2635
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 01-28-2018 06:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is photo PIA16111 showing a wheel track with the code in the Martian soil.

denali414
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Posts: 291
From: Raleigh, NC USA
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posted 01-29-2018 07:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for denali414   Click Here to Email denali414     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, I always like stories like this — shows despite the great technological knowledge needed, a little sense of humor always welcome.

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 40077
From: Houston, TX
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posted 06-04-2018 01:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA to Host Live Discussion on New Mars Science Results

The public is invited to ask questions during a live discussion at 2 p.m. EDT Thursday, June 7, on new science results from NASA's Mars Curiosity rover. The results are embargoed by the journal Science until then.

The event will air live on NASA Television and the agency's website.

Michelle Thaller, assistant director of science for communications, in NASA's Planetary Science Division will host the chat. Participants include:

  • Paul Mahaffy, director of the Solar System Exploration Division at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland
  • Jen Eigenbrode, research scientist at Goddard
  • Chris Webster, senior research fellow, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California
  • Ashwin Vasavada, Mars Science Laboratory project scientist, JPL
The public can send questions on social media by using #askNASA.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 06-07-2018 01:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From today's NASA release:
The new findings – "tough" organic molecules in three-billion-year-old sedimentary rocks near the surface, as well as seasonal variations in the levels of methane in the atmosphere...

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 40077
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-07-2018 03:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA 360-degree video
NASA's Curiosity rover surveyed its surroundings on Aug. 9, 2018, producing a 360-degree panorama of its current location on Mars' Vera Rubin Ridge. The panorama includes skies darkened by a fading global dust storm and a view from the Mast Camera of the rover itself, revealing a thin layer of dust on Curiosity's deck. In the foreground is the rover's most recent drill target, named "Stoer" after a town in Scotland near where important discoveries about early life on Earth were made in lakebed sediments.


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