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  STS-133: Viewing, questions, and comments (Page 8)

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Author Topic:   STS-133: Viewing, questions, and comments
FullThrottle
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Posts: 88
From: Seattle, WA, USA
Registered: Sep 2010

posted 03-04-2011 06:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FullThrottle   Click Here to Email FullThrottle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you to the crew of STS-133 and safe travels back home! I finally got to see a shuttle launch and was thrilled beyond belief!! The two second go or no go was a nail biter, you could have heard a pin drop out at the causeway... but it made for a huge uproar and emotional excitement when the scream for GO! went across the speakers!

I'm very sad that I waited so long to go see one!

Now that I know what I've missed and will never again see after this year, I think that I'm going to try and go to the STS-135 launch.

I'd love to watch Endeavour launch on its STS-134 final so I could catch the trio, but its too far and too much money to turn around a third time after making two STS-133 trips.

Thanks again to Tim Gagnon for the last large Apollo patch I bought from him and the other few I found on this trip that he made but I didn't get directly from him. Always beautiful patch work I keep saying it!!

Special thanks must be said to Ken Havekotte for his hospitality and taking the time to meet up twice with my mother and I. His collection is jaw dropping amazing and its inspired me to jump start my space collection with a few little do-dads I got from him off the shuttle! A few I'd like to identify further so I can find pictures of them in use and display them nicely.

I took about 150 pictures through the STS-133 launch sequence from pre-ignition to SRB seperation, from the NASA/Canaveral causeway. I'm very happy with how they came out! If I do indeed make the final shuttle launch on STS-135 I have a few ideas to take even higher quality pictures for a lifetime of memories. Without ever seeing a shuttle launch I was so excited but it goes so quick to decide how or where to focus my attention and camera zoom.

Fezman92
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Posts: 1030
From: New Jersey, USA
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 03-04-2011 07:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fezman92   Click Here to Email Fezman92     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Nice pics! What kind of zoom do you have? I'm going for 134 and have a 300mm zoom

FullThrottle
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Posts: 88
From: Seattle, WA, USA
Registered: Sep 2010

posted 03-04-2011 08:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FullThrottle   Click Here to Email FullThrottle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I used a 300mm with a Sony camera, no tripod!!

LOL, funny but true, I used a portapotty as stabilization something to lean on while I snapped away at the action!

I cut and cropped the pictures posted... even at full zoom it still looks relatively small in unedited form. My first picture is at 100% just cut at the edges to center my online picture.

300mm works great for nice pictures to post online! I'm going to try and print out cut and non-cut versions to check quality but I am happy with my results for a novice camera user with poor mans equipment!

GACspaceguy
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Posts: 1394
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 03-05-2011 06:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
GREAT photos! I am going to miss posts like these. I hope the weather is this clear for the next two launches.

dabolton
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Posts: 215
From: Round Lake, IL, US
Registered: Jan 2009

posted 03-05-2011 02:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dabolton   Click Here to Email dabolton     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Four views of Discovery launch stitched into single video.

Fezman92
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Posts: 1030
From: New Jersey, USA
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 03-06-2011 09:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fezman92   Click Here to Email Fezman92     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Are there going to be available unedited videos of the spacewalks and stuff? I know they have edited stuff, but I can't find unedited stuff.

BA002
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Posts: 88
From: Utrecht,NL
Registered: Feb 2007

posted 03-07-2011 02:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for BA002   Click Here to Email BA002     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just watched Discovery and ISS fly overhead. Well, overhead... I live in Holland and they got about as close as northern Spain! Still, since they were scheduled to appear just beside Jupiter I had a good aiming point for my binoculars, and when the duo rose a bit higher above the horizon I could see them with my own eyes.

One thing that struck me was how little their brightness seemed to differ. In fact, I think Discovery was ahead of ISS but the difference in brightness was so little I'm not even entirely sure. Could some one confirm the space shuttle flies ahead of ISS after undocking?

Although I was very excited to have managed to see Discovery on a "very marginal" pass it also saddens me that this was probably my last farewell to her (it?).

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-07-2011 05:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The ascent of space shuttle Discovery from NASA's Kennedy Space Center on Feb. 24 is shown from a number of unique angles recorded by multiple engineering cameras situated at and around Launch Pad 39A.

cspg
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Posts: 4046
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 03-09-2011 09:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) for March 9 has a photo of the ISS as Discovery is leaving.

Question: Based solely on the photo, how do you differentiate between a Soyuz and a Progress (there are three of them)?

OV-105
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From: Ridgecrest, CA USA
Registered: Sep 2000

posted 03-09-2011 12:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for OV-105   Click Here to Email OV-105     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Welcome home Discovery. Pride of the fleet, You are being parked too soon.

dabolton
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Posts: 215
From: Round Lake, IL, US
Registered: Jan 2009

posted 03-09-2011 07:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dabolton   Click Here to Email dabolton     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If she's going to Udvar, they should just landed her there and done the safeing there.

GACspaceguy
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Posts: 1394
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 03-09-2011 07:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dabolton:
If she's going to Udvar, they should just landed her there and done the safeing there.

Don't you wish it was that easy!

jasonelam
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Posts: 443
From: Monticello, KY USA
Registered: Mar 2007

posted 03-09-2011 07:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jasonelam   Click Here to Email jasonelam     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
Question: Based solely on the photo, how do you differentiate between a Soyuz and a Progress (there are three of them)?

One way is to look at the center of the vehicle. The Soyuz is more bell shaped with more clarity between the DM and OM, while the Progress has a cone-type center and the "DM" and OM components look almost as one.

Tom
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Posts: 1275
From: New York
Registered: Nov 2000

posted 03-09-2011 09:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Even though we weren't able to get the "flyabout" photo from Soyuz, I'm sure there's some talented people here that could "photoshop" Discovery into this great ISS photo.

Jay Chladek
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Posts: 2211
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 03-09-2011 11:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Okay Robert, I have to ask if that was you wearing a white shirt and holding a very large telephoto lensed camera being seen on the NASA TV feed after Discovery's wheels stop? It kind of looked like you anyway.

moorouge
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From: U.K.
Registered: Jul 2009

posted 03-10-2011 01:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dabolton:
If she's going to Udvar, they should just landed her there and done the safeing there.

Was I the only one who heard the PAO say during the recovery that Discovery was going to be retired to the Smithsonian in Washington, DC?

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-10-2011 04:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Chladek:
...was [that] you wearing a white shirt and holding a very large telephoto lensed camera being seen on the NASA TV feed after Discovery's wheels stop?
No, not me. I was on the midpoint tower and by wheels stop was back at my seat, updating this site (and wearing a blue STS-133 polo).

Delta7
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Posts: 1153
From: Ossian IN USA
Registered: Oct 2007

posted 03-10-2011 08:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was kind of hoping some members of Discovery's original crew would be there as VIP guests. Not even Mike Coats?

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 03-10-2011 12:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What three engines were used on Discovery and what are their histories (e.g., number of times used, what flights)?

dogcrew5369
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Posts: 547
From: Statesville, NC
Registered: Mar 2009

posted 03-10-2011 04:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dogcrew5369   Click Here to Email dogcrew5369     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hart Sastrowardoyo:
What three engines were used on Discovery and what are their histories (e.g., number of times used, what flights)?

I do know all three engines were last flown on Atlantis STS-129 although in different positions.

FullThrottle
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Posts: 88
From: Seattle, WA, USA
Registered: Sep 2010

posted 03-10-2011 06:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FullThrottle   Click Here to Email FullThrottle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Space Shuttle engine, ET tank and SRB designation numbers used on STS-133, according to NASA's press kit:

SSME 1: 2044
SSME 2: 2048
SSME 3: 2058
External Tank: ET-137
SRB Set: BI-144
RSRM Set: RSRM-112

Somewhere in my paperwork I hoarded from the launch, it had all the previous stats on the tanks and engines... I dug through my pile and can't find any specifics on previous flights although I remember being surprised at how many times the main engines had been refurbished/reused.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 03-10-2011 09:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
According to Wikipedia, which has the flights 'til 2006:

2044: STS-89, STS-88, STS-99, STS-106, STS-98, STS-105, STS-111 (edit: 2044 also flew on STS-125.)

2048: STS-95, STS-92, STS-110, STS-112 (and 119, on edit.)

2058: Not listed. (But flew at least 119.)

So, if this is correct, Discovery's last set of engines flew on the penultimate Shuttle-Mir flight as well as the first ISS mission; Glenn's shuttle flight; and the seventh flights of both Chang-Diaz and Ross as well as the last Hubble flight. Not too shabby.

Skylon
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posted 03-10-2011 10:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Skylon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Delta7:
I was kind of hoping some members of Discovery's original crew would be there as VIP guests. Not even Mike Coats?

Yeah. It'd have been a good photo op to have Hank Hartsfield shaking Steve Lindsey's hand in front of Discovery.

Mike Coats I suppose figured his place was at JSC, where the JSC Director usually is at landing, probably rightly so. He at least saw it off, as he was in the LCC on launch day.

But, I guess its hard to commit to such things. Bad weather, and a diversion to Edwards could render inviting a bunch of VIPs out to KSC moot. I do hope John Young and Bob Crippen are on hand for the last landing.

ivorwilliams
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Posts: 59
From: Welwyn Garden City, UK
Registered: Jan 2005

posted 03-11-2011 04:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ivorwilliams     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I watched Discovery land with a heavy heart and no doubt the final landings of Endeavour and Atlantis will hurt even more.

I was born on April 4th 1961, so really, I'm almost the same age as the NASA's manned space program. I wonder if 2011, my 50th year will see it finished as a NASA only entity.

Somehow, US astronauts hitching a ride on a Russian Soyuz just doesn't have the same romance attached to it.

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-11-2011 07:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hart Sastrowardoyo:
What three engines were used on Discovery and what are their histories (e.g., number of times used, what flights)?
Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne prepare a flight history for their engines before each launch. Here is the STS-133 SSME History:
  • ME-1, Block II 2044

    Tests/Flights: 902-666, STS-89, STS-88, STS-99, STS-106, STS-98, STS-105, STS-111, STS-113, STS-115, STS-123, STS-125, STS-129

    Total Hot-Fire Time: 6,649 seconds

  • ME-2, Block II 2048

    Tests/Flights: 902-678, STS-95, 902-749, STS-92, STS-102, 902-809, STS-110, STS-112, STS-115, STS-120, STS-124, STS-119, STS-129

    Total Hot-Fire Time: 6,665 seconds

  • ME-3, Block II 2058

    Tests/Flights: 902-862, 902-863, STS-116, STS-120, STS-124, STS-119, STS-129

    Total Hot-Fire Time: 3,595 seconds

Total hot-fire time is prior to the STS-133 launch.

cspg
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Posts: 4046
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 03-12-2011 01:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Discovery retires as viewed by Swiss cartoonist Chapatte (in International Herald Tribune).

Blackarrow
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From: Belfast, United Kingdom
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 03-12-2011 09:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A cartoon which is both whimsical and poignant. The caption is witty, but the picture is worth more than a thousand words.

Walter II
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posted 03-15-2011 05:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Walter II   Click Here to Email Walter II     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here are a few photos of Discovery's final approach as viewed from Canaveral National Seashore.


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