Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Exploration: Asteroids, Moon and Mars
  [Discuss] NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) (Page 4)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 4 pages long:   1  2  3  4 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   [Discuss] NASA's Space Launch System (SLS)
SpaceAngel
Member

Posts: 249
From: Maryland
Registered: May 2010

posted 11-21-2017 12:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In case no one heard, the SLS launch has been slipped until 2020; what a setback and I can concede that safety is a BIG priority.

Fra Mauro
Member

Posts: 1440
From: Bethpage, N.Y.
Registered: Jul 2002

posted 11-21-2017 12:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I know the delays are for a good reason but it get discouraging not only for this launch but to hear that there will be a delay of about two years for the next flight. That's the difference between the Saturn V and the SLS.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39823
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-21-2017 01:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The two years (22 months) between EM-1 and EM-2 is primary driven by the time needed to modify the mobile launcher to support the taller Exploration Upper Stage (EUS) equipped Space Launch System that will launch on EM-2 for the first time.
quote:
Originally posted by SpaceAngel:
...slipped until 2020
Officially, NASA is targeting December 2019 for EM-1:
While the review of the possible manufacturing and production schedule risks indicate a launch date of June 2020, the agency is managing to December 2019," said acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot. "Since several of the key risks identified have not been actually realized, we are able to put in place mitigation strategies for those risks to protect the December 2019 date."

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39823
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-15-2018 08:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In an editorial for Politico, Harrison Schmitt lays out the case for the Space Launch System.
Since the test flight of SpaceX's Falcon Heavy launch vehicle a few short months ago, many have questioned why we need SLS when commercial vehicles boast "bargain" prices. Their arguments center on the price-per-pound to orbit of commercial vehicles compared to SLS. However a price-per-pound comparison is practically meaningless in the context of real deep space mission requirements.

We need to launch crew along with the systems and supplies needed to support human life for longer than a couple of days in order to begin building our next "home away from home" in deep space. Depending upon location we will also need to launch a lot of infrastructure. For example, if lunar resources are to be used to support terrestrial fusion power, lunar settlement, and Mars exploration, large scale production and refining equipment and habitat and power facilities will be required.

SLS is designed to evolve to meet these needs. For purposes of comparison, let's assess just the current capabilities of SLS and SpaceX's Falcon Heavy in the context of each of deep space mission requirements...

cspg
Member

Posts: 5934
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 06-15-2018 10:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Why do we need to launch crew and cargo together? As for fusion, it doesn't work as of now so I fail to see what the SLS has anything to do with it.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39823
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-15-2018 10:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Schmitt has long advocated that helium-3 resources on the moon could be the driving force for a return, so while it is not a NASA priority, it is understandable why he included it.
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
Why do we need to launch crew and cargo together?
We don't, and SLS is not envisioned to launch with a crew on every flight, but Orion has been built to fly on SLS and Schmitt lays out his reasons for why he thinks Orion is the vehicle of choice.

SkyMan1958
Member

Posts: 764
From: CA.
Registered: Jan 2011

posted 06-15-2018 09:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For purposes of comparison, let's assess just the current capabilities of SLS and SpaceX's Falcon Heavy in the context of each of deep space mission requirements...
Last I heard the "current capabilities" of the SLS are zero, and both the major variants of it still need many billions of dollars of development funding.

Fra Mauro
Member

Posts: 1440
From: Bethpage, N.Y.
Registered: Jul 2002

posted 07-30-2018 12:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Will there be any test firings of the liquid stages of the SLS before the actual launch?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39823
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-30-2018 01:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A "green run" test slated for 2019 will fire the entire SLS EM-1 core stage with its four RS-25 engines on the B-2 test stand at Stennis Space Center.

The Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS) is already at the Cape awaiting launch. It is directly based on the Delta Cryogenic Second Stage, which has a long flight history.


This topic is 4 pages long:   1  2  3  4 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 2018 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement