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  Total solar eclipse over U.S. (Aug. 21, 2017) (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   Total solar eclipse over U.S. (Aug. 21, 2017)
SpaceAholic
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From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
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posted 08-24-2015 03:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Great American Eclipse is coming, how many lucky cS'rs will be in the path of totality?
On August 21, 2017, millions of people across the United States will see nature's most wondrous spectacle — a total eclipse of the Sun.

Blackarrow
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posted 08-24-2015 03:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If I have breath in my body, I'll be there! At last, a total eclipse that isn't in a faraway place with a single airline providing access (the classic "bottle-neck). Nobody can get away with charging grossly inflated prices to see this one. Too big an area!

Glint
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From: New Windsor, Maryland USA
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posted 08-24-2015 03:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I grew up in the path. Lived inside of it (except for a year or two here and there) until graduating from college. Will be returning to observe the eclipse along with family members and old friends still living there.

Skythings
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posted 08-24-2015 07:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Skythings   Click Here to Email Skythings     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In my high school years I studied astronomy. My astronomy teacher spoke of two solar eclipses. The last total eclipse visible in the continental USA for 38 years and this one. He suggested if we wanted to see a total eclipse the one to view was the February 26, 1979 one.

So that's what I did. I was 18 years old and I flew from Calgary to Great Falls Montana which was in the path of totality. I decided the best viewing area was actually at the Great Falls Airport perimeter, which is on an elevated plateau overlooking Great Falls.

It was one of the most amazing things to experience. You see or feel the shadow approaching from the west kind of like an approaching storm or when an airplane flies overhead and you just happen to be in its shadow. But this stays around and it did not get completely dark. It is actually fairly bright on the horizon all 360 degrees of it. It actually feels more like dusk just after sunset or just before sunrise. The street lights started to come on down below and the birds went completely silent.

The moon covers the suns disk and there is this magnificent corona or glow around the moon during totality. I used a dark dark piece of welders glass to view it. You have to be very careful not to over do it. Even with protection, you do get eye strain and you could possibly damage your eyes.

If you go, and you should, take my advice. Put your camera on a tripod and run video and forget about it. Forget about fussing with the camera equipment and getting the perfect pictures during the eclipse. Very few of my pictures turned out. I wished I had not watched it mostly through a viewfinder. This time I will just stand there and take it all in with no camera. There will be plenty of pictures of it available online.

Ironman
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From: Preston, Lancashire, United Kingdom.
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posted 09-15-2015 02:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ironman   Click Here to Email Ironman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would consider flying in for a holiday if it includes a free total eclipse!

Headshot
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From: Streamwood, IL USA
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posted 09-25-2015 11:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For you long range planners, an area just south of Carbondale, in the path of totality, will experience another solar eclipse on 8 April 2024.

SpaceAholic
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From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
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posted 09-25-2015 03:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And don't forget the 2191 annular eclipse... should be one worth waiting for.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-25-2015 03:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA today selected three organizations to support the science education associated with the upcoming 2017 total solar eclipse over North America:
  • Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. – Tucson, AZ. Matthew Penn, Principal Investigator for "Geographically Distributed Citizen Scientist Training for the 2017 Citizen CATE Experiment"

  • Exploratorium – San Francisco, CA. Robert Semper, Principal Investigator for "Navigating the Path of Totality"

  • Southwestern Community College – Sylva, NC. Lynda Parlett, Principal Investigator for "Smoky Mountains STEM Collaborative: Bridging the Gaps in the K-12 to Post-Secondary Education Pathway."

Rowland
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posted 10-08-2015 02:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rowland   Click Here to Email Rowland     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Myself and family will be flying in from England for the eclipse. Based in Florida we'll be looking at somewhere near Lake Marion, South Carolina to view the total eclipse. Hopefully there will be an event we can attend near that location.

Michael Davis
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posted 09-11-2016 03:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Michael Davis   Click Here to Email Michael Davis     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I’m curious as to where cS'rs who will need to travel are planning to view the eclipse. My own thought is that the odds of clear skies in August are best west of the Mississippi. Having an airport large enough to get to the location directly would also help. Kansas City or the Portland area seem to be on my short list.

mach3valkyrie
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posted 09-12-2016 11:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mach3valkyrie   Click Here to Email mach3valkyrie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I live almost in the middle of the path of totality 5 miles north of Albany, Oregon. Should have a pretty good chance of clear weather. I'm going to put in for vacation and am having an eclipse party. This will be a first for me. I was here for the partial eclipse on February 26, 1979. That was pretty eerie. Can't wait for the big show!

mode1charlie
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posted 09-13-2016 12:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mode1charlie   Click Here to Email mode1charlie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Davis:
Kansas City or the Portland area seem to be on my short list.
Nothing against Portland whatsoever (I hear it's lovely), but isn't it typically fairly cloudy there? I'd think somewhere between Wyoming and Missouri would be a better bet - but I defer to others' superior knowledge of that part of the country.

Ironman One
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From: Ormond Beach, FL USA
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posted 09-14-2016 07:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ironman One   Click Here to Email Ironman One     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Being from Portland, I remember the eclipse. It was in February 1979. I had my telescope with a sun projection screen ready to go the night before. The next day it rained. So much for seeing the eclipse.

cspg
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posted 09-24-2016 10:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There's a book about the 2017 and 2024 eclipses for those concerned and interested: Totality: The Great American Eclipses of 2017 and 2024.

canyon42
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From: Ohio
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posted 10-01-2016 09:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My plan is to head south from Ohio to the northern side of Nashville, Tennessee. From there there is a decent network of highways that will allow us to move fairly quickly in any direction if weather conditions look poor in that area.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-05-2017 10:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna Duberstein video
When depicting an eclipse path, data visualizers have usually chosen to represent the moon's shadow as an oval. By bringing in a variety of NASA data sets, visualizer Ernie Wright has created a new and more accurate representation of the eclipse.

For the first time, we are able to see that the moon's shadow is better represented as a polygon. This more complicated shape is based NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's view of the mountains and valleys that form the moon's jagged edge. By combining moon's terrain, heights of land forms on Earth, and the angle of the sun, Wright is able to show the eclipse path with the greatest accuracy to date.

p51
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posted 03-07-2017 02:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for p51   Click Here to Email p51     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The most recent lunar activity was totally obscured here in the Pacific NW. This time of year, it's always a coin flip on if you'll see anything in the sky.

But in August, that time of year is usually well into what little summer we get in this part of the country. The eclipse couldn't have fallen on a better date than in August.
And better still would be to be on the Eastern side of the Cascades when it happens. On that side of the mountains, it’s high desert for quite a long way. The Pacific Northwest is actually mostly desert and the green/rainy part is only a small fraction of the overall area.

This map is a good indicator of where will be best to see this.

PJ Downunder
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From: Lancefield, Victoria Australia
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posted 03-10-2017 12:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for PJ Downunder     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My brother's job regularly takes him to Napa and Sonoma. The last few trips I've been able to get a gig as his bag man. This June-July we're going again. I've been able to convince him to extend the trip to include a visit to Oregon for Mother Nature's display. The last one I saw was Melbourne 1976. I only had to walk out my back door for that one! And we have another one due on Boxing Day 2038. I've already invited a few friends around for that one.

Glint
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From: New Windsor, Maryland USA
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posted 03-10-2017 02:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My favorite online map for the eclipse, Xavier Jubier's Interactive Google 2017 Eclipse Map, allows you to zoom in all the way in great detail. Clicking on a point generates a pop-up with all of the circumstances for that location.

Mike Dixon
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From: Kew, Victoria, Australia
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posted 03-10-2017 05:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Dixon   Click Here to Email Mike Dixon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Melbourne one was unbelievable. Sent all the birds to the trees in a minute.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-13-2017 08:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Canon's Digital Learning Center has launched an Eclipse Photography Project:
This will be the first total eclipse in North America in the digital photography era, and that means that everyone from novice to professional photographers will be able to photograph it.

We are embracing this rare phenomenon and will publish articles, photos and videos between now and August to give you the necessary photographic skills and background information to capture this eclipse.

KSCartist
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From: Titusville, FL USA
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posted 03-28-2017 07:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've designed a special commemorative patch to mark the solar eclipse this August. It's designed in such a way to enable it to be personalized for each state and/or hosting organization in the viewing path.

My goal is to offer it to astronomy clubs and museums to use as a fundraising tool and a way to build espirit de corps amongst their members and viewing guests. If interested email me.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-27-2017 09:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The U.S. Postal Service will issue a stamp commemorating the eclipse on June 20.
The Total Solar Eclipse Forever stamp, which commemorates the August 21 eclipse, transforms into an image of the Moon from the heat of a finger.

yeknom-ecaps
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From: Northville MI USA
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posted 07-22-2017 09:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for yeknom-ecaps   Click Here to Email yeknom-ecaps     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anyone know of observatories that are in the path of the solar eclipse in August?

Have seen when observatories have expeditions to the path (e.g. Lowell Observatory group going to Oregon) but no observatories that are directly in the path.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-23-2017 02:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It looks like Laws Observatory on the roof of the astronomy and physics building at University of Missouri, Columbia will be in the path of totality.

Warkoczewski Observatory on the University of Missouri, Kansas City campus will be just on the southern edge of totality. Likewise, MTSU Observatory at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro and Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory at Vanderbilt University in Brentwood, Tennessee will be the same.

lspooz
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posted 07-27-2017 09:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for lspooz   Click Here to Email lspooz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've had a change in schedule and may be able to make the Columbia SC State Museum (Charlie Duke appearance). Are there any cS members with extra tickets? I'm on waitlist if more tickets are made available by the museum.

Thanks in advance.

dogcrew5369
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posted 07-27-2017 08:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dogcrew5369   Click Here to Email dogcrew5369     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by yeknom-ecaps:
Anyone know of observatories that are in the path of the solar eclipse in August?
The Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute in Franklin, NC will be stationed by NASA during the event. It's the first time in history that a total eclipse has passed over such an array of telescopes. It's not Lowell, but it's a proud moment for us North Carolinians.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-27-2017 10:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Science Channel release
Former NASA Astronaut Mike Massimino to Anchor Science Channel's Primetime Coverage of the Great American Eclipse

Former NASA Astronaut Mike Massimino, a veteran of two missions to the Hubble Space Telescope and four spacewalks, will host Science Channel's "Great American Eclipse" special airing Monday, August 21 at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

"Mike Massimino is a true hero of space exploration having risked his life to fix the Hubble Space Telescope," said Marc Etkind, General Manager, Science Channel. "His dedication to furthering our understanding of the universe make him the perfect guide to take our viewers through the once-in-a-lifetime Great American Eclipse."

"Even as a child staring into the sky, I was fascinated with what's out there," added Massimino. "And I'm excited to be sharing my lifelong passion for space exploration with Science Channel viewers."

On, August 21, for the first time in 99 years a total solar eclipse will span the continental United States, the path of totality stretching from Oregon to South Carolina. Science Channel will be on the ground to capture the excitement with live coverage starting at 12 p.m. ET from Madras, Oregon and will continue throughout the day from other locations along the eclipse's path. Science Channel will also be airing an eclipse preview special on Sunday, August 20 at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

A Great American Eclipse wrap-up special airing Monday, August 21 at 9 p.m. ET/PT, featuring same-day eclipse footage, will be hosted Massimino. Massimino will anchor the network's coverage from Charleston, South Carolina, one of the last land-based sites to see the eclipse.

Great American Eclipse will spotlight the NASA WB-57 eclipse project, which will observe the eclipse with two high speed fighter jets, each carrying infrared and visible light cameras taking high definition video. Also featured will be the Eclipse Ballooning Project, which will send high altitude balloons up in the air from about 25 locations across the total eclipse path, sending live video and images to NASA. This has never been done live, and certainly not across an entire continent.

dogcrew5369
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posted 08-01-2017 04:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dogcrew5369   Click Here to Email dogcrew5369     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Where I live in North Carolina we'll have 96% totality. Not too shabby.

Blackarrow
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posted 08-01-2017 05:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
96% of totality is — and I cannot emphasize this strongly enough — absolutely useless. If you have the means to travel into the path of totality, do it. Even if you have to walk. The difference between 96% and totality is like the difference between a 2D VHS black-and-white video and a 3D 4K colour video. Only more so.

jasonelam
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posted 08-01-2017 09:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jasonelam   Click Here to Email jasonelam     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I live in Southern Kentucky, where will be at 98.4% totality. However, I only have to drive 31 miles to get into totality. The worst part is it takes place 30 minutes before work. Might have to use some vacation time to see it.

spaced out
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posted 08-02-2017 05:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In my opinion (as someone who traveled for a total eclipse some years ago) it is absolutely worth using a half day vacation to reach totality.

Glint
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posted 08-02-2017 08:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jasonelam:
I only have to drive 31 miles to get into totality...
The duration of totality falls off very rapidly near the shadow's edge due to the moon's curvature. By penetrating further into the central path, you will be able to prolong the experience. You don't need to necessarily travel to the center line, but go at least half-way from the edge to the center.

That is my recommendation, and this will be my 7th visit to the central path of a solar eclipse!

Glint
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posted 08-02-2017 08:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just above, I recommended getting as close to the centerline of the central eclipse path as possible in order to prolong totality. This is the conventional wisdom. However, not everyone agrees with this approach.

A good friend was the the late Dr. Tom Van Flandern who was once Chief of the Celestial Mechanics Branch of the Nautical Almanac Office at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington.

He was an avid eclipse chaser where, like during his career, he tended to question the conventional wisdom in astronomy. Tom was a proponent of observing total solar eclipses form the path's edge, not the center line.

The reasons for doing so involved what he perceived as an increase in the beauty of the eclipse's physical appearance at the expense of its duration.

He explained it in chapter 12 of his book "Dark Matter, Missing Planets and New Comets." Here is a link to it on Google Books. Check the text for search result 2 on p. 245 for more information.

dogcrew5369
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posted 08-02-2017 09:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dogcrew5369   Click Here to Email dogcrew5369     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Blackarrow:
96% of totality is — and I cannot emphasize this strongly enough — absolutely useless.
I appreciate your emphasis on 96% being useless, but I'll have to take it. My wife's having laser eye surgery that day and I'm going to unfortunately be preoccupied. I'd love to go a little further south, but considering my wife can only see it with one eye I'm not going to worry about it. Good luck to those who can travel.

Glint
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posted 08-02-2017 10:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Your 96% could be an interesting experiment. Please let us know if you see any of the corona at all.

I've typically been able to view it a minute or so before or after totality, but expect that at that time the sun is more like 98 or 99% covered.

And of all the days to have eye surgery!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-02-2017 11:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
PBS release
NOVA to Present Special Day-of-Event Presentation of 'Eclipse Over America'

On Monday August 21, 2017, America's eyes will be glued to the skies as the mainland United States experiences the first total solar eclipse since 1979, and the first to cross the USA since 1918. PBS' award-winning Science series, NOVA, produced by WGBH Boston, will capture the spectacular event in a special presentation to air hours after it takes place.

This extraordinary cosmic spectacle will pass through 14 states, and everyone in the continental U.S. will have the opportunity to see at least a partial eclipse, possibly making it the most widely viewed American eclipse of all time. Commencing at 10:15 a.m. PDT (1:15 p.m. EDT), a lunar shadow 73 miles wide will take one hour and 33 minutes to travel from Oregon on the west coast to South Carolina on the east, allowing continuous observation for 90 minutes.

NOVA's most extensive fast-turnaround film to date, "Eclipse Over America" will be the ultimate companion to this spectacular celestial event. NOVA will follow teams working on the forefront of solar Science and solar storm detection, incorporating immersive CGI animation to reveal the sun's secret mechanisms, stunning sequences of the eclipse itself, NASA footage, and more. NOVA will also collaborate with several local public television stations along the path of totality, who will provide footage shot in their own back yards, illustrating the excitement the eclipse generates across the nation.

"NOVA is thrilled to provide our audiences across the U.S. with an up close, in-depth look at this extraordinary event," said Paula S. Apsell, Senior Executive Producer of NOVA. "We are excited to share the experience with viewers and provide a scientific perspective on the celestial mechanism behind this total solar eclipse and what it can tell us about the inner workings of our sun."

Also during the eclipse, NOVA will present a Facebook LIVE event in partnership with PBS "NewsHour." Hosted by PBS Science Correspondent Miles O'Brien, the event will feature commentary by Jason Kalirai from the Space Science Institute and other experts gathered to watch the eclipse from a location about 40 miles east of Irwin, Idaho. Additional details will be released via NOVA social media channels closer to August 21st.

NOVA "Eclipse Over America" will be available to stream the morning after broadcast on all station-branded PBS platforms, including PBS.org and PBS apps for iOS, Android, Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV and Chromecast.

NOVA "Eclipse Over America" is produced for PBS by WGBH Boston. Senior Executive Producer for NOVA is Paula S. Apsell.

Cozmosis22
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posted 08-04-2017 05:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cozmosis22     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Officials at the zoo in Knoxville, Tennessee will be carefully monitoring the animals there during the expected 150 seconds of total darkness.

Ronpur
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posted 08-04-2017 06:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ronpur   Click Here to Email Ronpur     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have made plans to visit friends in Georgia, who are a short distance from the line. Of course, if my parents still lived in Hopkinsville, KY, they would be close to the maximum of the totality.

Skythings
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posted 08-04-2017 06:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Skythings   Click Here to Email Skythings     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I had the great privilege to observe the 1979 total eclipse in Great Falls, Montana on the ridge at the airport overlooking the city. One of the most memorable experiences in my life. Something I will never forget.

I had my camera setup and all the filters and spent too much time fussing with it trying to get some pictures. Sadly none of them really turned out well. I felt I missed some of the experience looking through a lens too much.

Some advice for the not so scientific who will be fortunate to be in the path of totality. Leave your camera at home or set it on a tripod filming the west horizon as the ominous shadow bears down on you and then with a flash rolls away to the east 3 minutes later.

The amazing part for me was what happened on the ground all 360 degrees around me. The sunset like colours all around the horizon, the birds chirping like it was morning again and the car horns honking and the streetlights coming on. It is a true lifetime experience.

There will enough professional footage of the actual eclipse on YouTube. Yes, do take the proper safety glasses and take some time to look at the corona around the moon flashing from between the mountains and valleys. Near the end of the period of totality the ring effect and flash is special, but get your eyes back on the horizon as the shadow thunders away to the east.


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