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  Total solar eclipse over U.S. (Aug. 21, 2017) (Page 2)

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Author Topic:   Total solar eclipse over U.S. (Aug. 21, 2017)
Glint
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posted 08-07-2017 10:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Skythings:
Leave your camera at home or set it on a tripod filming the west horizon as the ominous shadow bears down on you and then with a flash rolls away to the east 3 minutes later.

One set-up I'm using is a portable motorized equatorial mounting (Sky-Watcher Star Adventurer) on which I'm attaching a Hydrogen-alpha scope and a "white light" filtered spotting scope for visual use "by the crowd" while I'm off doing other things. It has a jack for driving a camera shutter too, so on a separate tripod next to it I'll be using an otherwise unused DSLR and a wide angle lens to capture time-lapse images of the approaching shadow.

I only have the one camera available for time-lapse video, so I've been debating on whether to point it westward, eastward, or at the sub-solar horizon point (~southward).

Any recommendations?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-07-2017 11:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From the Planetary Society and U.S. National Park Service:
Today, a special-edition Eclipse Explorer Junior Ranger program booklet and badge were made available to the public. The program's motto is "Explore, Learn, and Protect," and the Eclipse Explorer booklet and badge are designed to inspire and empower kids and families while enhancing their learning experience.

In the booklet, Bill Nye joins Junior Ranger CaLisa to educate kids and families about eclipses. On the day of the eclipse, Aug. 21, Bill Nye will be on stage at Homestead National Monument to welcome kids and families and complete the educational activity booklet. They will be sworn in as new Junior Rangers after the eclipse. Anyone is welcome to participate in this program.

  • Online: Junior Ranger Eclipse Explorer booklets are now available online, so kids, families and educators throughout and outside of the U.S. National Park Service region can access them.

  • At U.S. National Parks & Monuments: Parks in the eclipse Path of Totality and others will offer Junior Ranger Eclipse Explorer badges and booklets. Contact your nearest park or monument for details.

GACspaceguy
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posted 08-07-2017 11:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have sent this out to a number of folks.

Please everyone make sure you read the safety information out there on the solar eclipse share with family members. While one would think everybody knows that you should not stare at the sun during a partial eclipse it is easy to do as there is little irritation and you do not “feel” anything happening. In the end you end up with permanent damage to your retina that appears as a swirling disc that never goes away.

Our area will have a 97% solar coverage and thus will be as harmful as if the sun was fully exposed. As I child I was around for the 1972 eclipse and there was only about a 50% coverage of the sun. Unlike the fully exposed sun that “hurts” when you stare at it, during an eclipse that is not the case, so it makes you think you are fine staring at it. Understand that a glance will not leave any permanent damage (so I have been told) it is staring at the sun that is mostly covered by the moon that is an issue.

That is exactly what I did. As a curious young science minded type I wanted to see what this eclipse was all about. I stared at the sun and watched as the moon covered up so much of it. Later that evening when my brother and I went fishing I saw the damage I had done. I could no longer see the floating bobbin in the water, what I could see is that same swirly object you see after someone takes a flash picture. 45 years later and that “swirly“ is still there. While it has not stopped me from doing most things in life it did change my career path from Pilot/Astronaut to Engineer.

I applaud the our county initiative to keep the children out of school that day. The time in question would be at the time they are heading home and not as well supervised to be directed in not looking at the sun and what they may do to themselves unknowingly. Take it from one who has the scares the view is not worth the final damage.

Except for those in the totality path I hope it is a cloudy day for the rest of us so that no accidents happens. Just my point of view for the voice of firsthand knowledge.

Glint
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posted 08-07-2017 01:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Too bad that safe viewing techniques such as pinhole projection had not been invented yet in 1972.

Great recommendation to remind family and friends that the danger is real unless you understand and practice safe viewing with the proper equipment or techniques.

Nowdays, the eclipse glasses are virtually everywhere. They have evolved from aluminized Mylar, to black polymer, to silver-black polymer. (Silver-black is the new black. ) I'll be traveling with 50 pairs — have already given away another 50.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-07-2017 02:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Chiquita video
It took an intense knowledge of celestial bodies and an unrelenting love for bananas, but we did it. On August 21, Chiquita will move the moon in between the sun and the earth. For a fleeting moment before and after the totally overrated total solar eclipse, the sun will appear to be an enormous fiery banana. This phenomenon shall henceforth be known as the Chiquita banana sun. Please enjoy it. (And remember, wear eclipse-safe eyewear.)

Find out more at thebananasun.com.

Glint
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posted 08-08-2017 12:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When comparing notes on eclipse watching years ago, Glenn Schneider mentioned in passing that he "keeps watching 'till it hurts." When I asked "isn't that dangerous?" he smiled and replied, "all of us true umbraphiles have numerous tiny crescents burned into our retinas."

I don't think he was advocating risky behavior. And hope that he was kidding about the crescent-crossed retinas.

Blackarrow
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posted 08-08-2017 12:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Maybe not... There was a partial eclipse in May or June, 1966, visible in Northern Ireland. I was 11. From memory, about two-thirds of the sun was covered. It was a beautiful sunny day and the media were all over the eclipse. I had plenty of opportunity to see it in spite of being at school and all I had to protect my eyes was a strip of darkish photographic negatives.

Although I knew of the risks, I certainly stared too much, and had the proverbial "spots in front of my eyes" for weeks afterwards. No mylar protective glasses in those days!

Blackarrow
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posted 08-08-2017 12:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jasonelam:
Might have to use some vacation time to see it.
I have three pieces of advice for you:
  1. Do it!
  2. Do it!!
  3. Do it!!!

fredtrav
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posted 08-08-2017 12:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fredtrav   Click Here to Email fredtrav     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Blackarrow left off several things:
  1. Do It
  2. Do it
  3. DO IT
I only wish I could do it. Where I live it will be over 90%, but the full eclipse will be about a three hour drive away. I had planned on driving to see but due to recent surgery, I can drive yet and can not sit in a car for 6 hours plus the eclipse time. So I will have to be content with what I can get.

But to reiterate do it!

GACspaceguy
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posted 08-10-2017 05:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Blackarrow:
Although I knew of the risks, I certainly stared too much, and had the proverbial "spots in front of my eyes" for weeks afterwards.
I truly wish mine only lasted a few weeks, so far it has been 45 years! It is more than a crescent as well. It is in fact a significant swirling dot in the center of my vision that I have to look around to focus.

This is serious though, in my case I am allowed to drive but with uncorrectable vision flying an aircraft is out.

I do have a question about the areas that are in the 97%. Will there be any significant dimming?

The reason I ask is I am to give an interview on the local TV news and my experience is limited to about a 60% coverage and as I recall there was no appreciable dimming. I am sure they will ask about a 97% coverage and would a significant dimming cause people i.e. read that children to look up.

JBoe
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posted 08-10-2017 06:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for JBoe   Click Here to Email JBoe     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have a refractor telescope, is there a "cheap" homemade way to make a filter or "device" to put on it? Thanks!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-10-2017 07:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Based on several DYI guides, you can order solar filter film, cut it to size and build a cap out of PVC and other materials, but that may be more expensive than ordering a ready-made filter, such as this one for a 70mm refractor from Celestron.

On edit: Space.com: How to Make Solar Filters (and Why You Might Not Want To)

mmmoo
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posted 08-10-2017 08:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mmmoo   Click Here to Email mmmoo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I saw a total eclipse back in 1999 which you can read about on the Moonpans Facebook page.

One thing I wasn't expecting, was to see four planets lined up beside the sun during totality. I am guessing they were Mercury, Venus, Mars and Jupiter. But what was amazing was that they gave you the impression of actually seeing the Solar System how it really is, like a real life Orrery! These four planets should also be visible on Aug. 21, definitely worth looking out for.

JBoe
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posted 08-10-2017 04:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JBoe   Click Here to Email JBoe     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks guys! This helped a lot, I think I'll go sheet way and make an adapter for the telescope.

Blackarrow
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posted 08-10-2017 04:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am really, really uncomfortable with any discussion involving someone looking at the sun through a telescope, no matter how strong a safety "guarantee" is provided. The only way to observe the sun through a telescope is not to.

Over many decades, the advice of all reputable astronomers has been never to view the sun directly (even if 98% eclipsed) through a telescope, but to use the telescope to project an image of the sun onto a white card or similar surface.

A camera fitted over the lens can transmit a live image of the sun to a TV monitor. If the filter cracks or slips, the only harm is to the camera lens, not to an irreplaceable human eye.

Mike Dixon
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posted 08-10-2017 04:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Dixon   Click Here to Email Mike Dixon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Agreed... downright dangerous.

ejectr
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posted 08-11-2017 12:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm going to a friend's house in South Carolina that is fairly close to the 100% area. Got my ISO glasses on their way and I'm psyched!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-11-2017 04:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA TV will be providing coverage of the eclipse:
NASA Announces Television Coverage for Aug. 21 Solar Eclipse

On Monday, Aug. 21, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the Sun, and NASA Television will carry it live from coast to coast from unique vantage points on the ground and from aircraft and spacecraft, including the International Space Station. Coverage will be featured during the live four-hour broadcast Eclipse Across America: Through the Eyes of NASA.

Programming begins at noon EDT with a preview show hosted from Charleston, South Carolina. The main show begins at 1 p.m. and will cover the path of totality the eclipse will take across the United States, from Oregon to South Carolina. The program will feature views from NASA research aircraft, high-altitude balloons, satellites and specially-modified telescopes. It also will include live reports from Charleston, as well as from Salem, Oregon; Idaho Falls, Idaho; Beatrice, Nebraska; Jefferson City, Missouri; Carbondale, Illinois; Hopkinsville, Kentucky; and Clarksville, Tennessee.

The Toshiba Vision screen in New York’s Times Square will broadcast the program live in its entirety to give the public a big-screen view of the eclipse. Viewers in Times Square can listen to NASA coverage while observing it on the big screen by downloading the NASA app or going to nasa.gov/eclipselive.

canyon42
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posted 08-12-2017 02:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Blackarrow:
...the advice of all reputable astronomers has been never to view the sun directly (even if 98% eclipsed) through a telescope
If you mean without proper filtering, of course. That would also apply to looking at any view of the sun with your unaided eye.

Otherwise, no. There are any number of dedicated solar telescopes and solar filters that are used extensively by amateur astronomers that are perfectly safe *if* used correctly by someone who knows what they are doing. (For example, you never use one applied at the eyepiece end, only a full aperture one at the point where the light enters the instrument.)

Go to any large public star party and you'll see them in use throughout the day to observe sunspots and prominences. You'll see them being used by members of the public of all ages at these and other events. Saying that "reputable astronomers" say otherwise is simply untrue.

Blackarrow
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posted 08-12-2017 05:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm not retracting a word of what I said. Even if the techniques you describe produce no cases of blindness, the mere sight of hundreds of people looking at the sun through telescopes will encourage others to do the same, using no, or no adequate filter. I hope I'm completely wrong, but I suspect there will be hundreds of Americans with normal vision on 21st August who will be blind in one eye on 22nd August. Even if it's only one victim, that's still too many.

canyon42
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posted 08-12-2017 05:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Whether you retract it or not, the statement you made is simply not true. I don't disagree that the potential exists for people to harm themselves by looking at the sun with or without optical aid, but that's not the same as claiming that astronomers say that no one should ever use a telescope to observe the sun because it's impossible to do it safely. If you have evidence that says otherwise, please provide it. It's not difficult to find dozens of citations from astronomical societies and groups from around the world.

I get the concern about safety, because I share it. Will people do dumb things and stare at the sun during the eclipse despite all the warnings to not do so? Of course they will — human nature assures us of that. But making blatantly false claims about what scientists say about watching the event safely is not the answer. Education is a much better approach, as it is in many things.

Glint
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posted 08-13-2017 09:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've been busy making custom solar filters for friends and others. Using materials like lids from peanut butter jars or cat litter containers, mint packages and things lying about that happen to be a close enough fit. The only thing they have in common is that they are full aperture filters constructed with pieces from a 12"x12" sheet of Thousand Oaks (TM) black polymer. One sheet goes a long way.

The filters in the image below for a pair of Fujinon 16x70 binoculars were made out of strips of cardboard from a sturdy gift box, scotch tape, black electrical tape and black polymer. They slip on with a snug fit, but not too snug that taking them off will jostle the optics so that the sun gets lost at the critical time when totality's fleeting moments arrive:

Black Polymer solar filters for 16x70 binoculars

Note: Like with the aluminized Mylar "Solar Screen" from the old days, slight ripples or wrinkles in the filter make no difference in the image viewed.

Blackarrow
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posted 08-13-2017 11:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Staring at the sun through binoculars with home-made filters attached? Madness. Mad to do it, mad to be seen doing it by people who don't have even a home-made filter attached.

canyon42
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posted 08-13-2017 05:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Look, perhaps you don't feel comfortable with it, and obviously you don't have experience with it — but attaching a "madness" label to people who are constructing perfectly safe equipment out of certified materials is just out of line.

As for other people, that's what all of the *legitimate* safety warnings are for, to alert people without experience in this area of the dangers involved if one does not do it correctly — and to emphasize to them that if you do not have expertise with this, you need to only observe under the guidance of someone who *does* have such expertise.

Or we can go with the strategy of telling people blatant and intentional falsehoods, and falsely attributing these falsehoods to scientific experts, in a misguided effort to save people from themselves. You know how that will work out? Let's just imagine two people who are going to a publicly-sanctioned eclipse viewing event. One has been given information with accurate safety warnings. The other has been lied to and told there is no safe way to view the eclipse with any sort of instrument. Both of these people arrive at the event and see hundreds of people happily viewing the eclipse through telescopes set up by astronomers, both professional and amateur.

The first person remembers the safety warnings that he or she heard, gets in line, and upon reaching their turn hears the same warnings all over again as they get a wonderful view of the partially eclipsed sun with perhaps some sunspots or maybe a prominence or two. The second person sees all of this and says "Wow, that guy who lied to me is full of it," and decides that looking at the sun with optical aid must in fact be no big deal. Which scenario do you really think has more possible danger? In my book, the "madness" lies in deliberately deceiving people rather than providing accurate safety information.

And if that scenario doesn't give you pause at all, consider this. It is fairly well-known in the U.S. at least (don't know why it would be common knowledge outside of the country, but perhaps it is) that one of the "prime" locations visited by totality on this occasion is Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. If you follow this link, you'll find a description of the "designated Official Eclipse Viewing Areas where rangers and astronomers will provide telescopes and interpretive programs." Do you seriously think the U.S. National Park Service is going to do this if all "reputable astronomers" say there is no safe way to observe the sun?

Like I said before, I get the safety concerns. People who want to view the eclipse (at least in its partial stages) need to be very careful in how they do so, whether with their naked eyes or with optical aid, and if they don't have experience with that then they should follow the lead of someone who does. But flat-out making stuff up is just plain the wrong approach, if for no other reason than that it will be found out for what it is and then the legitimate safety advice may be ignored as well.

I'm seriously having a hard time believing we're debating which safety approach is best, giving accurate warning information and advice vs. spreading information that isn't true, on a website devoted to topics related to science and technology.

canyon42
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posted 08-13-2017 05:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And Glint, I'd love a look through those binoculars. And I'll have one of those bananas while I'm waiting my turn.

oly
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posted 08-13-2017 09:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From an outside perspective this subject seems to have been taken over to an ugly side. You guys have an opportunity to experience a once in many peoples lifetime event that everyone should stop and take it in if they can. Look around at the world and appreciate the beauty of what is going on. No government money is going in to bringing you the eclipse, it will be nature at its best, clouded over or not.

If you're able to take the time and make the effort to be a first hand witness to this spectacular event then I hope you do and please do it safe. Guide your kids and grand kids to do the same. Just looking out a your local scenic lookout or vista and seeing it in the changing light of the eclipse will be something you probably can't do again. So you don't even have to look up, just look around.

Blackarrow
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posted 08-14-2017 01:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by canyon42:
Or we can go with the strategy of telling people blatant and intentional falsehoods, and falsely attributing these falsehoods to scientific experts, in a misguided effort to save people from themselves...

But flat-out making stuff up is just plain the wrong approach, if for no other reason than that it will be found out for what it is...

...giving accurate warning information and advice vs. spreading information that isn't true...


What makes you think you have some sort of right to accuse someone else of "telling blatant and intentional falsehoods"?

Instead of launching into a rant, you should examine what I actually said more closely. Much of what I posted amounted to opinion, which you are free to agree with or disagree with. The one statement of fact which I made ("Over many decades, the advice of all reputable astronomers has been never to view the sun directly through a telescope, but to use the telescope to project an image of the sun onto a white card or similar surface.") You have already indicated that you agree with this assertion. It is self-evidently true, so where are the "deliberate falsehoods"?

The late Sir Patrick Moore, general editor of "The Astronomy Encyclopaedia" (Mitchell Beazley: my edition 1987) wrote about solar eclipses as follows:

It is dangerous to look at the sun at any time, especially with optical aids. The only safe way to observe the partial phase is to project the image of the sun onto a white surface. Only during totality is it perfectly safe to look directly at the occulted sun and the corona.
I wasn't quoting Sir Patrick when I made the post that seems to have lit your blue touchpaper, but it was obviously somewhere in my memory.

As to the rest of my comments, these amounted to opinion. I am still of the opinion that the only fully safe way to observe the sun through a telescope (or binoculars) is not to. I acknowledge that many amateur astronomers choose to observe the sun through filters, (presumably accepting that any slight risk could have dire consequences). How many, in the excitement of the build-up to a total eclipse, properly check the filter for damage? What about the finder-scope? Has it been covered or removed? It is all very well for experts to use solar filters if they so wish, but a total eclipse (particularly in a heavily-populated country like the USA) will attract hundreds of thousands, possibly millions, of casual viewers who will not know how to view the eclipse safely, in spite of all the warnings. How many of them, seeing "experts" using telescopes or binoculars to observe the partial eclipse, will point a cheap telescope at the sun while holding a few dark photographic negatives over either end of the instrument?

I note that one of the approved manufacturers of solar filter polymer gives the following explicit warnings:

  • Check filter for any damage before each use;
  • Avoid touching the surface of the film;
  • Do not leave the instrument unattended where children or inexperienced adults could point it at the sun without the filter properly attached.
Exactly.

I stand by my OPINION (apparently shared by the late Sir Patrick Moore, whose lunar maps were used by NASA in preparation for Project Apollo) that it is a bad idea to use a telescope or binoculars to observe an eclipse, except by projection. You are free to disagree. You may think I am unnecessarily cautious, perhaps even out of date. But that does not give you the right to accuse me of telling "blatant and intentional falsehoods" and "flat out making stuff up." I do not expect to see such unacceptable and provocative language on collectSPACE.

I hope no-one blinds themself while observing this eclipse. The irony of all this talk about telescopes is that the best view of the total eclipse is achieved by just looking at it, ideally through two undamaged eyes. Most amateur astronomers I know express the wish that they had spent less time fussing over equipment and more time just looking.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-14-2017 02:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think everyone here has good intentions and the medium (text without tone) is leading to some unnecessary bruised feelings.

That said, every major eclipse viewing site, from Oregon to South Carolina, is likely going to have telescopes set up for people to look through, many provided by professional astronomers, museums and NASA. So, there are safe ways to observe the sun through a telescope — that much is established.

In addition, Celestron (for example), Meade and other respected telescope manufactures have been selling telescopes specifically for the purpose of viewing the eclipse. They wouldn't be doing this if there was a significant risk to the public.

At the same time, those same groups — NASA, museums, astronomers and telescope manufactures — have been very forthcoming about the risks of looking at the eclipse without the proper protection. Journalists, teachers, parents, community leaders and enthusiasts have been doing the same. Even Chiquita devoted a portion of its viral ads to promoting safe viewing. The message is loud and clear.

No one wants anyone to come to any unnecessary harm, but curtailing a safe activity because someone might misconstrue what they see is not the answer.

Joel Katzowitz
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posted 08-14-2017 02:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Joel Katzowitz   Click Here to Email Joel Katzowitz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Another wrinkle in eclipse viewing safety: I recently ordered a 10 pack of glasses from Amazon that were described as meeting the appropriate CE and ISO safety standards. Several weeks after I received the glasses I received this notification:
Amazon has not received confirmation from the supplier of your order that they sourced the item from a recommended manufacturer. We recommend that you DO NOT use this product to view the sun or the eclipse.
Amazon refunded my payment which I then applied to another brand of glasses. However, before placing the re-order I checked with several online sources to verify the manufacturer actually met the safety requirements.

Please double check that the equipment you purchased is as advertised before you use it.

moorouge
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posted 08-15-2017 03:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It occurs to me to mention something I did in a local shopping centre the last time the UK had a total eclipse.

Using just a mirror and a piece of paper with a small hole in it I projected the image of the eclipse onto the wall. All you need to do is place the paper and hole over the mirror and line it up to reflect the eclipse onto the wall. Usually the smaller the hole the sharper the image.

As I recall quite a crowd gathered to watch the show.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-16-2017 12:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
Total view: A brief history of solar eclipses seen from space

Don Pettit has never looked up to see a total solar eclipse. Twice, though, he has looked down.

As a past crew member on the International Space Station, Pettit is among the few astronauts and cosmonauts to have witnessed an eclipse from space. On Monday (Aug. 21), he will witness his first total solar eclipse from the ground.

"This is going to be a real pleasure, because I have seen two total solar eclipses from space and I haven't seen any from the Earth," Pettit said in an interview with collectSPACE. "This will be my first total solar eclipse seen from Earth."

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-16-2017 07:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA's LRO Team Wants You to Wave at the Moon

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) team invites the public to wave at the Moon on Aug. 21 as LRO turns its camera toward Earth.

Above: NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has observed solar eclipses from its vantage point at the moon before. The image LRO takes of Earth on Aug. 21, 2017, is expected to look similar to this view, which the satellite captured in May 2012. Australia is visible at the bottom left of this image, and the shadow cast on Earth's surface by the moon is the dark area just to the right of top-center. (NASA/GSFC/ASU)

The LRO Camera, which has captured gorgeous views of the lunar landscape and documented geologic activity still occurring today, will turn toward Earth during the solar eclipse on Aug. 21 at approximately 2:25 p.m. EDT (11:25 a.m. PDT) to capture an image of the Moon's shadow on Earth.

"I'm really excited about this campaign because it is something so many people can be a part of," said Andrea Jones, LRO public engagement lead at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. "So much attention has been focused on the lucky folks who will get to experience eclipse totality, but everyone in an entire hemisphere of the Earth can wave at the Moon as LRO takes our picture!"

During the eclipse the Moon will be far enough from Earth that the resolution of the images are 2.5 miles per pixel. While the LRO Camera won't be able to see people or buildings, it will be able to see the continents, clouds and large surface features.

"While people should not expect to see themselves in the images, this campaign is a great way to personalize the eclipse experience," said Noah Petro, LRO deputy project scientist at Goddard.

A note of caution: the only time it's safe to look at the Sun without eye protection is if you're in the 70-mile-wide path of totality and only during the minutes of totality. Do not look directly at the Sun at any other time without certified eclipse glasses. For more information on eclipse eye safety.

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 39954
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-17-2017 03:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GACspaceguy:
I stared at the sun and watched as the moon covered up so much of it. Later that evening when my brother and I went fishing I saw the damage I had done.
Fred's story was picked up by his local news as a cautionary warning.
"Both eyes, eclipse burns. So, basically, what is that? It's like in flash photography, you see that little swirly thing after the flash. I see it all the time. It never goes away. A little worse on the right side than the left side, but it's always there. And that's really from staring at the sun," he said.

Lunar rock nut
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Posts: 885
From: Oklahoma city, Oklahoma U.S.A.
Registered: Feb 2007

posted 08-19-2017 06:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lunar rock nut   Click Here to Email Lunar rock nut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Prepping for 400 mile drive or more Monday morning. Targeting Nebraska from my location depending on weather forecast down to the last min. Before departure most likely around 3:00 A.M. CST Monday morn.

Friday morning our local weather girl mentioned that the eclipse of 2045 has been predicted to have up to six minutes of totality. She did not quote her source for this information. I would be 88 years old if I am still around (doubtful), but would be cool.

If the weather does not cooperate this time around I'll look forward to 2024 as Arkansas is a shorter drive from my house.

MarylandSpace
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Registered: Aug 2002

posted 08-19-2017 06:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MarylandSpace   Click Here to Email MarylandSpace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How many astronauts are making presentations both before and during this total eclipse? They are certainly spreading goodwill.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39954
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-19-2017 09:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is not a complete list, but going by state:
  • Idaho: Alvin Drew
  • Illinois: Ellen Ochoa
  • Kentucky: Stephen Bowen, Terry Wilcutt
  • Missouri: Michael Hopkins, Janet Kavandi
  • Nebraska: Clay Anderson, Mike Fincke
  • Oregon: Donald Pettit, Jim Wetherbee
  • South Carolina: Charles Duke, Doug Wheelock
  • Tennessee: Roger Crouch, Soichi Noguchi, Rhea Seddon
  • Wyoming: Scott Altman, Steven Hawley, Jim Reilly, Harrison Schmitt

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39954
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-20-2017 05:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hello from Carbondale, Illinois! Now in place at Southern Illinois University with Space.com and LiveScience for tomorrow's total solar eclipse...

moorouge
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From: U.K.
Registered: Jul 2009

posted 08-21-2017 02:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With respect Robert it's not T-shirts that you need but a large drum to make a loud noise to chase away the sun eating dragon.

Meantime, this makes interesting reading.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39954
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-21-2017 05:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
Astronauts on space station to watch solar eclipse on three orbits of Earth

Three Americans are in a position to get a truly unique view of the "Great American Eclipse."

Randy Bresnik from Kentucky, Jack Fischer from Colorado and Peggy Whitson from Iowa won't be in the path of the totality, where, from the vantage point of Earth, the moon aligns with the sun, but with their three Italian and Russian crewmates, they will witness the solar eclipse from orbit on board the International Space Station.

JBoe
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Posts: 900
From: Churchton, MD
Registered: Oct 2012

posted 08-21-2017 01:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JBoe   Click Here to Email JBoe     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
...you can order solar filter film
Thanks Robert for pointing me to the Baader filters on Amazon. I spent the last part of the week putting it together using a 4" PVC cap with a 100mm hole cut out in the center. Needless to say I did pickup an astronomy magazine with glasses in them for backup.

Unfortunately, the filter is really difficult to use on my telescope, but works great with my camera!

We are about 50% covered (1355-1405 local) here in West River, MD. That said the camera is being "acclimated" to eliminate fogging!


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