Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Patches & Pins
  NASA Space Shuttle Program Commemorative (Page 1)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 4 pages long:   1  2  3  4 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   NASA Space Shuttle Program Commemorative
Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29598
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-11-2009 09:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
NASA launches in-house patch contest to mark shuttle era's end

With just six space shuttle flights remaining, the next scheduled to lift off next week, NASA has invited its past and present space program workers to design an emblem to mark the end of the shuttle era. The winning design will be flown on the shuttle before the fleet retires.

The patch design contest, which began Oct. 15 and runs through the first of next month...

If you're eligible to enter this contest and do so, we invite you to share your design with collectSPACE, too!

(Less there be any confusion, the patch that comes out of this contest will not be the STS-133 crew patch but a commemorative patch for the shuttle program as a whole.)

Hart Sastrowardoyo
Member

Posts: 2431
From: Toms River, NJ
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 11-12-2009 12:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would prefer something simple: the STS program triangle, and underneath that a gold-bordered rectangle, in a similar configuration to that worn in the early Shuttle program. In the rectangle, the dates of flight: 1981-2010.

LMDAVE
New Member

Posts: 3
From: Metairie
Registered: Nov 2009

posted 11-20-2009 08:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LMDAVE     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I found this page by doing a search on shuttle patches. The work shown on here by the graphic artists are great!

I submitted a patch design for the contest since I'm an eligible employee. I'm not an artist so the quality is no where near as good as shown in samples here, but when I was given the oppurtunity to submit something, I thought it was a great idea. I sketched something on paper a few weeks back, colored it, and did a few computer touch ups, and submitted it. I don't really want to post anything until after the due date for submission.

It would be a great honor if it was even considered for the winning patch, and I would be ecstatic to see NASA's graphic artist's drawing of it.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29598
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-20-2009 09:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Welcome Dave, and thanks for sharing your story. We have several resident artists among our community here who have helped the shuttle and station crews design their patches, so they too might be able to assist with fleshing your design.

Whether it is after the submission deadline or after a winner is selected, I am sure many here would enjoy seeing your patch concept too.

KSCartist
Member

Posts: 2600
From: Titusville, FL USA
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 11-20-2009 09:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dave, welcome to cS! I'm sure your design will be well received. As Robert's article mentions - they're not necessarily looking for professional artists work but something that comes from the heart. I'm sure yours does and I look forward to seeing it.

LMDAVE
New Member

Posts: 3
From: Metairie
Registered: Nov 2009

posted 11-20-2009 10:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LMDAVE     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the welcoming. I do believe the design came from the heart, and the write up along with it also. I do think I have "some" artistic talent, but just not on the level of those shown here.

I'm curious to see the other submissions also.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29598
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-04-2009 10:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
Astronauts, space workers submit designs for NASA's end-of-shuttle patch contest

Two months ago, NASA put out the call to its past and present employees: design a patch to symbolize the end of the space shuttle program coming to a close in 2010 and the chosen artwork will fly to orbit on one of the final flights.

Their in-house patch contest now over -- the deadline for designs expiring Tuesday -- the space agency is sorting through the nearly 100 entries it received, including some offered by those who rode on the shuttles to space...

This article includes two of the submitted designs but as noted:
collectSPACE is working to soon host a public gallery of all the patch designs entered in NASA's contest.

NavySpaceFan
Member

Posts: 638
From: Norfolk, VA
Registered: May 2007

posted 12-05-2009 07:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I like the design by the anonymous JSC employee, very nice.

lm5eagle
Member

Posts: 394
From:
Registered: Jul 2007

posted 12-05-2009 08:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for lm5eagle   Click Here to Email lm5eagle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The illustrated design by a flight controller from Houston is first class and very worthy of serious consideration by those who will eventually decide. However, we have only seen two exemplars. I am sure there will other worthy designs lurking out there.

NavySpaceFan
Member

Posts: 638
From: Norfolk, VA
Registered: May 2007

posted 12-05-2009 09:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Agreed, and I can't wait to see the rest.

LMDAVE
New Member

Posts: 3
From: Metairie
Registered: Nov 2009

posted 12-05-2009 11:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LMDAVE     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, I said I would post my submission after the deadline, so here it is. It was just a hand sketch with slight computer touch-up. I'm not a computer graphic artist, but this is it:

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29598
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-06-2009 12:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A few of our resident patch designers also came up with designs.

Marc Jacobs, who worked with several shuttle crews (including STS-98 and STS-120) to design their mission patches, developed these two concepts, though unfortunately they were not eligible for the contest.


© Marc Jacobs. All rights reserved.
At left: The shape mimics the original program patch, including the inner white outline. Inside the patch you see the shuttle touching down - the end of its mission - with its nose held high, into the setting sun. There are 14 golden rays in the sunset in honor of the crews of Challenger and Columbia. The swirls of "smoke" coming from the wheels represent the American flag. Six white stars - one for each shuttle in the program, including a smaller one for Enterprise. The four red-white stripes represent the four decades of the program. The shuttle is landing on the Earth, representing the global impact the shuttles have had, in addition to the contribution of astronauts and hardware from around the world. Finally, the white star at the top represents all of the objects the shuttle has placed in orbit, retrieved from orbit, serviced in orbit as well at the International Space Station.

At right: The only symbolism are the 14 stars surrounding the shuttle in honor of the crews of Challenger and Columbia.

Tim Gagnon, who has worked with both shuttle and station crews (including STS-126, STS-129, Expedition 22 and Expedition 23), was able to enter his design as the company he works for, AERO Industries, is a NASA and United Space Alliance supplier of aerospace metal alloys.


© Tim Gagnon. All rights reserved.
The focus of the design is the orbiter coming home for a safe landing at the conclusion of it's final mission. The sun is setting on an extraordinary era while the constellation Orion rises in the sky - the next golden age of exploration? We hope so. The crescent Moon and the red "star" of the planet Mars as seen from Earth are prominently displayed as they represent the goals of the Constellation Program. The galaxy is a tribute to the Great Observatories launched by the space shuttle. Hubble, Chandra, Compton and the knowledge gained from those satellites. The International Space Station passes overhead. Now complete, it continues its mission of science and international cooperation.

The inner border is made up of 135 stars representing every shuttle mission. The first star is blue to honor the work performed in the atmospheric tests of the orbiter "Enterprise." The stars representing the STS- 51L and STS-107 missions are gold to reflect on their ultimate sacrifice. The outer border prominently displays the colors of the Flag of the United States of America - to honor the people who designed, built and supported the program with their blood, sweat, tears and taxes. The fourteen stars in the sky honor the memory of the astronauts who lost their lives aboard Challenger and Columbia.

The names of every orbiter surround the design in gold. Each orbiter was assigned a team of people who cared for it and flew it. These names honor all of those people. The legend "Space Shuttle" honors all those who supported the program in other ways. From the administrators to the clerical staff and maintenance workers - and to those who cheered on from the sidelines. The dates 1976 - 2010 were chosen because the first orbiter rolled out of the assembly plant on September 17, 1976 "Constitution Day" during our Bicentennial Year. The last wheels stop is scheduled to occur in September, 2010.

Rocketman!
Member

Posts: 60
From: Redmond, Washington, USA
Registered: Dec 2007

posted 12-06-2009 02:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rocketman!   Click Here to Email Rocketman!     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here are several of the designs I created for the Space Shuttle Program commemorative patch contest. I have posted additional patch design variations on my art portfolio web site.

To give the judges a variety of options to choose from, I created four different designs with several variations for each one. It was difficult to guess what approach NASA might be looking for, so in some of my designs I emphasized the accomplishments of the Space Shuttle program and in others I simply represented the three decades of orbital operations of the shuttle, itself.

After submitting three of my designs, Debbie Byerly informed me that they were asking each artist to submit only one design. That made for a challenging choice to be made. After talking it over with my wife and a friend who is also a fellow collectSPACE forum member, I decided to enter the first design shown here.


© Dave Ginsberg. All rights reserved.
Above: The design celebrates the Space Shuttle's thirty years of orbital operations (1981 - 2010) and the many great accomplishments of the Space Shuttle program. It is modeled after the traditional mission crew patches that have been used on space flights since the 1960's.

The Space Shuttle Orbiter is shown prominently over the Earth. Three other spacecraft join the Space Shuttle in this design, symbolizing just a few of the many achievements made possible by the Shuttle program.

To the left of the Shuttle is the International Space Station (ISS), which was launched, assembled, and populated largely by Space Shuttle missions (together with Russian modules and vehicles).

Shown above the ISS is an astronaut floating free in space using a Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU). The MMU was first demonstrated in space on a Shuttle flight.

To the right of the orbiter is the Hubble Space Telescope. The Hubble was launched into space, placed in orbit, and serviced several times using the Space Shuttle. Stars and a galaxy represent the expanding knowledge of the universe the Hubble has given us.

The Moon and Mars are illustrated to represent the future direction of human space exploration, and the many science achievements the Space Shuttle program has contributed toward those goals.

Six small stars represent the six orbiters in the Shuttle fleet. The names of the six vehicles of the fleet (including Enterprise) surround the design.

The two seven pointed stars, placed near the names of Columbia and Challenger pay tribute to the loss of those orbiters and the seven member astronaut crews of each of those missions.


© Dave Ginsberg. All rights reserved.
Above: This simple graphic design emphasizes the three decades the U.S. space program used shuttles to send humans and equipment into orbit.

The Space Shuttle Orbiter is shown in glowing silhouette orbiting a brilliant blue crescent Earth. The Earth's near circle creates part of the number 30, the number of years the Shuttles will have flown in space since the first flight in 1981 to the final flight projected to be in 2010.

The names of the six vehicles of the fleet (including Enterprise) surround the design.


© Dave Ginsberg. All rights reserved.
Above: The design celebrates the Space Shuttle's thirty years of orbital operations (1981 - 2010).

The Space Shuttle Orbiter is shown in glowing silhouette. The booster rockets and external tank are rendered in white and gray, recalling the design of the original Space Shuttle program patch as well as the painted white external tank used during the first launches.

The names of the six vehicles of the fleet (including Enterprise) surround the design.

A variation of the basic design includes the MMU, Hubble, and ISS.


© Dave Ginsberg. All rights reserved.
Above: This simple triangular design celebrates the Space Shuttle's thirty years of orbital operations.

The Space Shuttle Orbiter is shown in glowing silhouette. Three blue shock diamonds represent the three decades the Space Shuttle has been in service.

The triangular shape recalls the design of the original Space Shuttle program patch.

The names of the six vehicles of the fleet (including Enterprise) fan out below the Orbiter.

bthumble
Member

Posts: 157
From: Houston, Texas USA
Registered: Nov 2007

posted 12-06-2009 02:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bthumble   Click Here to Email bthumble     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dave - Love your designs. Also like that you included Enterprise in your design. She is an important ship, and sometimes overlooked.

KSCartist
Member

Posts: 2600
From: Titusville, FL USA
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 12-07-2009 06:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Super designs.

Marc I have to say I consider myself lucky you're not an eligible employee. I went up against you once before and came up short. You're a very talented artist!

Dave a very thoughtful design. I can tell it came from your heart and I think you've got an excellent shot.

Rocketman - I never thought about multiple entries. Super job! If you don't win this competition, I hope you'll send them to the USPS. I see some excellent commemorative stamps in your designs.

I can't wish you guys luck but I do wish you well. I'm not as confident of my chance as I was when I sent it in. Fingers crossed.

NavySpaceFan
Member

Posts: 638
From: Norfolk, VA
Registered: May 2007

posted 12-07-2009 09:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Those are amazing! Marc, the design on the right is just classic. Tim, great as always. And Rocketman, your actual submission is outstanding and the others are very good as well (I like the red, white an blue version of the "spectrum patch" you have on your web site alot).

Patch_Designer
New Member

Posts: 9
From: Scottsdale, AZ USA
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 12-07-2009 11:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Patch_Designer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you for your comments about my designs. I think all of them look great!

Dave G., I really like your triangle design. In looking at it the designer in me couldn't be restrained and I had a couple of design ideas I thought I'd toss out. I wonder if you considered making the shuttle silhouette something other than black? (Too somber.) Perhaps, a royal blue with the colored stripes shades of red-orange-yellow? Also, what if you extend the bottom of the triangle, under the names, and mimic the original shuttle patch by including "Space Shuttle"? Just my 2 cents. But they really are well done. Congrats.

Good luck to everyone who participated. —  Marc Jacobs

Sean Collins
Member

Posts: 27
From: Houston, Texas, USA
Registered: Dec 2009

posted 12-16-2009 09:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Sean Collins   Click Here to Email Sean Collins     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I submitted a design and have just registered on collectSPACE...


© Sean Collins. All rights reserved.
My design of the Space Shuttle Program Commemorative patch is based on Expanding New Horizons to our future in Human Space Exploration. I picked the most dramatic angle of the Shuttle I could find to highlight the magnificence of the most complicated space vehicle in the world. The sunrise/sunset means two things: (1) The beginning of a new program, and (2) The sunset days of the Space Shuttle Program. The stars honor the Astronauts who lost their lives on Challenger and Columbia, and they are in the same star configu- ration as they appeared on the STS-51L and the STS-107 patches. The blue and red colors in the Commemorative patch are the same blue and red colors that are in the NASA Meatball, signifying what a large part the Space Shuttle has been to the essence of NASA. The dates on the patch represent the first and last flights of the Space Shuttle.
------------------
Sean Collins
Graphics Technical Lead
Tessada & Associates, Inc.
NASA/Johnson Space Center
Houston, Texas

KSCartist
Member

Posts: 2600
From: Titusville, FL USA
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 12-16-2009 11:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sean, beautiful patch!

Welcome to cS. I'm sure you'll find that you're among friends here. I hope from time to time you'll post other images of your work for us to enjoy.

NavySpaceFan
Member

Posts: 638
From: Norfolk, VA
Registered: May 2007

posted 12-16-2009 01:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Welcome aboard Sean!!! That is yet another great design. I do not envy the judges their task, it will be a tough decision to make between all these entries.

KAPTEC
Member

Posts: 529
From: Madrid, Spain
Registered: Oct 2005

posted 12-16-2009 02:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KAPTEC   Click Here to Email KAPTEC     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hey guys I take off my hat with your designs. Specially (for me) yours, Sean, they are simply magnificent. Congratulations. I hope one of them be the final chosen one.

Rocketman!
Member

Posts: 60
From: Redmond, Washington, USA
Registered: Dec 2007

posted 12-17-2009 01:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rocketman!   Click Here to Email Rocketman!     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks to all for your thoughtful comments and suggestions. I am enjoying everyone’s creative expressions, and I am impressed with the variety and uniqueness that can come from a simple set of guidelines.

If art is a representation of feeling, then what we’ve seen so far is but a small indication of the variety of emotions the Shuttle Program has excited from within the human spirit. Speaking for myself, seeing all these great designs and reading about the symbolism certainly elicits a variety of feelings and memories about the Space Shuttles and their missions.

One common theme I am noticing is the idea of the “sunset” to represent the end of the program. And, the additional symbolism of a “sunrise” provides a very positive and optimistic double meaning. I have to admit that I’m kicking myself for missing that one when creating my designs.

Other examples of creative symbolism that pop out for me … Marc Jacobs’ use of orbiter planforms as olive branch leaves or “scrambled eggs” (with perhaps 30 on each side for 30 years?); Tim Gagnon’s 135 stars representing every shuttle mission (with two gold ones for the lost ships, plus one blue one for the Enterprise tests); LMDAVE’s day/night opposition to span the beginning and the end.

My overall favorite, so far, has to be Sean Collins’ design. Sean, yours has a very dynamic and three-dimensional look. I like how the shuttle stack blasts toward the viewer and breaks though the enclosing circle of the patch. That is a very powerful image. I am enjoying the rendering style used on the shuttle stack, as well. It is clear that your skills are well suited to your occupation.

Congratulations and good luck to everyone for applying your best creative efforts toward this contest. I appreciate the good spirit shown in this forum. It is good to experience camaraderie among fellow artists and space enthusiasts. I am looking forward to seeing more designs and comments.

Sean Collins
Member

Posts: 27
From: Houston, Texas, USA
Registered: Dec 2009

posted 12-21-2009 10:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Sean Collins   Click Here to Email Sean Collins     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Dave, your designs look very nice and clean. I wish we could use gradients in our crew patch designs but unfortunately NASA will not pay for decals done with gradients because it cost more than the spot colors that we produce all the crew patches in with the one exception on STS-98...

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29598
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2009 05:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Browse all 85 designs and read our exclusive interview with space shuttle program manager John Shannon...
Designing an uplifting end to NASA's space shuttle program

From pencil sketches to crayon drawings, vague concepts to professional-looking layouts, the 85 designs NASA received for a patch to symbolize the end of its space shuttle program varied as widely as the past and present employees who created them.

That was exactly what the contest organizers had hoped would happen...

teopze
Member

Posts: 165
From: Warsaw, Poland
Registered: May 2008

posted 12-22-2009 06:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for teopze   Click Here to Email teopze     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I like few: 74, 12, 16, 51. But it's the number 62 which is by far the most wonderful patch I have ever seen! What a great design. It's fantastic! I'll keep my fingers crossed for it.

(It would make the best Robbins Medallion ever.)

Philip
Member

Posts: 4958
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 12-22-2009 06:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Isn't it a bit too early to mention the year 2010 in the design. Couldn't there be yet another mission in 2011?

NavySpaceFan
Member

Posts: 638
From: Norfolk, VA
Registered: May 2007

posted 12-22-2009 07:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Besides the ones entered by cSers, I find that numbers 51, 68 and especially 38 are my picks for the front runners.

mderos
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 12-22-2009 08:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mderos   Click Here to Email mderos     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There are a few good ones but for me 53 and 71 are the best, simple, to the point, and classic.

lewarren
Member

Posts: 269
From: Houston, TX, USA
Registered: Aug 2001

posted 12-22-2009 08:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for lewarren   Click Here to Email lewarren     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wow, I really like some of the designs. Well done, everyone who entered!

I may have missed it, but I didn't see a single image of a Spacelab in a payload bay.

NavySpaceFan
Member

Posts: 638
From: Norfolk, VA
Registered: May 2007

posted 12-22-2009 08:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by lewarren:
I may have missed it, but I didn't see a single image of a Spacelab in a payload bay.
I did not see any either, nor did anyone mention SPACEHAB.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29598
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2009 10:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Though not inside the payload bay, design 54 includes a depiction of Spacelab, as does entry 83. Design 46 includes symbols for "Spacelab science."

SPACEHAB is depicted inside the payload bay in designs 63 and 64.

NavySpaceFan
Member

Posts: 638
From: Norfolk, VA
Registered: May 2007

posted 12-22-2009 11:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
SPACEHAB is depicted inside the payload bay in designs 63 and 64.
Good eye Rob! I almost needed a magnifying glass to see it on number 64.

BMckay
Member

Posts: 2048
From: MA, USA
Registered: Sep 2002

posted 12-22-2009 11:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for BMckay   Click Here to Email BMckay     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How about some type of contest where we pick who will win?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29598
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2009 11:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My plan is to host a similar but unofficial "people's choice" poll as mentioned in the article once the judges have selected the 15 finalists.

(In fact, I had hoped to have voting open today for all the designs but after several days of struggling to get the script working as desired, just ran out of time...)

James Brown
Member

Posts: 1238
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 12-22-2009 01:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for James Brown   Click Here to Email James Brown     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Designs 14, 25, and 74. Three best.

canyon42
Member

Posts: 192
From: Ohio
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 12-22-2009 02:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I like a lot of them, but I'm a little confused by one. Maybe it's some sort of design element that I'm missing, but shouldn't the dates on the little gray orbiters in number 31 be switched? Still a nice design, though.

FFrench
Member

Posts: 3100
From: San Diego
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 12-22-2009 02:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Although it's not one he ended up submitting, I love Dave's "simple triangular design" in the thread above.

For something that represents an entire program, there seems no way to include everything the shuttle ever did short of overstuffing a patch with Hubbles, stations, Spacelabs, dates, etc. I love the clean, elegant designs such as Mike Okuda and Robert McCall's shuttle patches plus the STS-4 patch, which have rarely been matched by patches in recent years (STS 127 being an outstanding exception). They say it all without showing it all.

Dave, your simple and elegant design above has class, spirit and a message that everyone can grasp. It also (rightly) includes Enterprise. It doesn't make the mistake of trying to be a mission patch - instead it works wonderfully as a graphic symbol.

Although such simplicity seems to have fallen out of fashion with space patches (contrary to movements in graphic design in general), I hope the winning design has such moving, elegant beauty.

Mike Dixon
Member

Posts: 808
From: Kew, Victoria, Australia
Registered: May 2003

posted 12-22-2009 02:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Dixon   Click Here to Email Mike Dixon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Number 14... brilliant!!

Bill Hunt
Member

Posts: 378
From: Irvine, CA
Registered: Oct 2002

posted 12-22-2009 05:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bill Hunt   Click Here to Email Bill Hunt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Lotta nice designs there, but I'd say 1, 10, 14 and 37 are my faves.

Go4Launch
Member

Posts: 418
From: Bethesda, MD
Registered: Jul 2003

posted 12-22-2009 07:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Go4Launch   Click Here to Email Go4Launch     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have to agree with Bill. Number 1 is simple yet striking, with the orbiter in silhouette.

Number 14 would be my second choice.


This topic is 4 pages long:   1  2  3  4 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2014 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement