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  In the Shadow of the Moon (Outward Odyssey) (Page 3)

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Author Topic:   In the Shadow of the Moon (Outward Odyssey)
heng44
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posted 09-03-2007 10:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Francis. This extra month of waiting time is actually a bonus, because now I get more time to look forward in anticipation.

heng44
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posted 09-06-2007 12:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Amazon has now shipped my copy!

cspg
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posted 09-06-2007 12:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Same here!

WAWalsh
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posted 09-06-2007 08:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for WAWalsh   Click Here to Email WAWalsh     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Alright, I am a little unhappy with our two distinguished authors.

On back order for a month, my copy of "In the Shadow of the Moon" arrived in the mail yesterday. After getting the kids to bed after their first day of school, I started flipping through the book. Finally, at 1:45 am I decided I needed to put the book down and get a little sleep (with the alarm set for 5:45). Enthralling.

tegwilym
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posted 09-06-2007 11:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm almost 1/2 way through Shadow of the Moon. Gosh....this is great stuff! I learned so much about Apollo 1, Komorov and just about everything else covered in the book.

Where is the Seattle traffic jams when you need it while reading "Shadow" on the bus? I have to be careful not to forget to get off the bus when I reach my stop.

FFrench
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posted 09-11-2007 02:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks so much, guys, for those very nice words! Ed and Chris, hope that your copies get to you soon.

It was nice to see this new review that suggested the book would be a good tool for educators to use to get high school kids excited and inspired - I certainly hope it does get used in this way, that would be wonderful. A couple of people have contacted me who are using it in universities.

Whizzospace
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posted 09-13-2007 11:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Whizzospace   Click Here to Email Whizzospace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Francis & Colin, you've done a superb job! I'm about 150 pages in, and this is a delightful read - a superb living history. The tone and pace are energetic, and your future threading weaves a much more interesting story than the linear path many space historians use.
As quite a few reviewers note, you've got lots of great "nuggets" - stories from the crews I've not heard before, or related in the same way.
I can't wait to finish and write a full review. Unless there are surprises waiting to be published, you're my #1 book for 2007.

ColinBurgess
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posted 09-13-2007 11:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Comments such as these from folks such as yourself who have a deep and enduring passion for the subject are greatly appreciated, and definitely mean a lot to us after a wonderfully enjoyable and always interesting collaboration these past few years.

tegwilym
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posted 09-14-2007 12:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm on the Apollo 10 chapter just after the LM spin. I'll probably finish the book soon.
When is the next one coming out?

FFrench
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posted 09-14-2007 12:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Info on the next books coming out in the series can be found here - Colin made a posting there on that subject recently. Some great books coming down the line.

John, thanks so much for those wonderful comments. Out of curiosity, did you read "Into That Silent Sea" first, or begin with this one?

eurospace
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posted 09-14-2007 05:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for eurospace   Click Here to Email eurospace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Your (latest) book travelled with me during my short trip to Gdansk/Poland this week, and it took me this week to read it from start to end. It was time very pleasantly spent - excellently written, and a smooth composition from the beginning to the end. If I hadn't come for some other things to see, I probably wouldn't have stopped reading before the last page would have been turned. That is quite an achievement for a non-fiction book.

Many of us had read the individual astronauts' autobiographies that are on the market. On those astronauts of course, little new could probably be said. However, your book unearthes stories and background from those others that have not yet shared their life with the readers. In this context, I particularly enjoyed the extensive descriptions from Bill Anders, Rusty Schweickart, Donn Eisele that figure prominently in the book.

If I "missed something" after having read the first volume, it is the stories from NASA's competitor, the Soviet space programme. The first volume had covered the stories of Gagarin, Titov and Tereshkova. The 2nd volume only briefly mentions Komarov, and a longer paragraph on the joint flight of Soyuz 4 and 5. I feel a larger coverage of the parallel events in the Soviet Union would have been interesting - after all, they also had a Moon programme.

There is another reason of course: while stories and inside information about the US programme are tantamount and the book just adds a few interestin bits, the Soviet programme is - despite more openness since Glasnost - still fairly unchartered territory. Writing about the "social history" of THIS programme is not only still missing, but also a considerable challenge.

In other words: in case you were planning another book in that series, this would be an interesting topic. ;-)

To summarize my recommendation: if you want to have solid reading on the early US space programme, get yourself the two books Francis and Colin have written, add Andy Chaikin's book(s) about the Moon Landings themelves, and you have pretty much what an avid reader must have. Kudos to Francis and Colin!

FFrench
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posted 09-14-2007 06:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for that considered review. Knowing you as someone who pulls no punches, I know you would have told us if the book had not kept your attention. I'm so glad that it did: and you are adding us into a pretty high pantheon there, which is wonderful to hear. I'm so glad you enjoyed it.

You raise some good points about the differences in the two books. The first one does feel a lot more back-and-forth between the Soviet and US programs. It wasn't a choice of ours, but simply how the space program evolved chronologically. We had to tell history as it happened - and in following each person as they made their first flight into space, the second half of the decade was very different from the first.

In "Into That Silent Sea," writing about 1961-65, we could bounce back and forth between Mercury, Vostok and Voskhod flights, as they happened that way chronologically. For the second book, picking up after Voskhod 2, we begin by covering a time when the entire manned Gemini program took place and no Soviet spaceflights were made. It's not until 1967 that the Soviets got back into the game, and of course that was with the tragic Komarov flight, which we cover in a lot of detail (we covered his early life and first flight in the prior book). When the Soviets resume manned flight in 1968, it's the first occasion in this book's time frame that the Soviets return a cosmonaut from space alive. Three years without a successful flight - that was a long time in the heated space race of the 1960s.

So it's not that we were ignoring the Soviets - they just weren't flying. In the time frame we cover, all but one of the successful flights took place in the last year - 1969.

When they do fly, I think we give them a lot of attention and detail, as well as explaining why there were such large gaps between flights. Beregovoi's life and troubled Soyuz 3 flight is comprehensively covered. For Soyuz 4 and 5 (which get a significant part of a chapter, not just a paragraph), I think we give a good personal history of all of the cosmonauts involved, including a lot of personal details from interviews with them. Volynov, in particular, gets a lot of attention, with the prejudices he faced as the first Jewish spacefarer, and an accurate account of his almost-fatal re-entry (with much personal input from him) which has been told incorrectly elsewhere.

And that, in truth, are all of the flights that the Soviets flew in this time - a time when the US flew Geminis 3-12, Apollos 7-11, and went through the Apollo 1 tragedy.

Part of the reason, as we explore in the book, was that the Soviet program was trying to cover too many disparate aims at once. This second book, covering the difficult and sometimes tragic early history of Soyuz, shows how the Soviets worked through these early challenges to create the enduring workhorse of space travel that is still in (heavily modified) use today.

The story it sounds like you were also looking for - the parallel attempts for the Soviets to have a person fly around and / or land on the moon - is covered in our books - just not this one. We covered it in a lot of detail from the point of view of Alexei Leonov at the end of "Into That Silent Sea." As the person who consistently had a good chance of making such a flight, and who felt the immense frustrations of not doing so, Leonov's life seemed like the perfect place to tell those events, allowing it to be a personal as well as a technical story. As none of the planned missions flew, I feel it would have been a little out of place to have tried to squeeze them into this second book, which covers what did fly.

So, rather than not covering the social history of this second half of the decade from the Soviet point of view, I'd say that we do - but what you picked up on were a good number of years of confusion, regrouping and relative lack of flying.

I'm so glad you picked up on the effort to tell the stories of people like Eisele, Anders and Schweickart - people who have either passed away or have said they have no plans to write books themselves. And yet they are some of the most fascinating people. Anders and Schweickart were two of the most generous and giving people with their time and proofreading, and I strongly suspect this is the nearest we'll ever come to seeing their autobiographies. As for Eisele, he is so overlooked by space history, and yet was in the middle of two, arguably three, of the most contentious events in the astronaut office that ever took place. To have both of his wives not only contribute heavily to the book, but also agree together on the final draft, felt like a miracle to me. I hope the book helps people understand him just as well as we understand the better-known astronauts. Similarly, I am so pleased that Wally Schirra and Gordon Cooper gave so much of their time and thoughts to us for the events covered in this book, and people will now have the chance to hear them expressed.

Thanks again for your much-appreciated words and thoughts.

Jay Chladek
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posted 09-14-2007 08:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dang, makes me want to tear into this, but I have to wait a little longer since I only got my copy of "Into that Silent Sea" today. I was hoping "Shadow" would show up as well, but it probably won't arrive until early next week. Oh well. I suppose it is best to read these two in chronological order rather then trying to jump the gun (although Gemini is my favorite of the classic NASA programs).

Concerning other books coming up, the Skylab book I am guessing probably won't go back and fourth on the US and Soviet efforts since there wasn't much flying in 1973, but I am hoping that the moon book does. After that, who knows. You two have certainly set a high bar. So anyone that writes after in the series will really have their work cut out for them. I am going to be glued to these first two books for every page as much as I can, that is for sure.

Whizzospace
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posted 09-15-2007 12:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Whizzospace   Click Here to Email Whizzospace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
John, thanks so much for those wonderful comments. Out of curiosity, did you read "Into That Silent Sea" first, or begin with this one?
I haven't read your previous work, so I'll look forward to heading backwards in time a bit. I'd have to say the 'buzz' on this one was louder, and grabbed a bit harder.

And speaking of why I find this book works so well: the combination of regional perspectives. I especially like hearing from voices raised somewhere apart from the US. For example, I really enjoyed Hamish Lindsay's 2002 work "Tracking Apollo to the Moon" because Australian 'flavour' was full of stylistic differences, and subtleties not found in American retellings - a fresh perspective.

Maybe it's like regional menus, where you get tired of the same thing, and just want some new ingredients?!

FFrench
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posted 09-16-2007 07:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Whizzospace:
...speaking of why I find this book works so well: the combination of regional perspectives. I especially like hearing from voices raised somewhere apart from the US.
Thanks, John, for that interesting thought. With Colin being from Australia (but having a career that literally flew him all over the world), and myself growing up in England and now living in the US, it's probable that we did indeed bring a different perspective. Certainly, I grew up following the Soviet and American programs equally, and I believe Colin was the same.

Jay, I agree that reading the books in order makes most sense if you are reading both - however I'm really pleased, John, that starting with the second book worked just fine for you, as they were intended to also work as standalone volumes.

And thanks, as ever, to everyone for all the great feedback.

tegwilym
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posted 09-17-2007 11:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I read Silent Sea first. I bought it when I was at the KSC autograph show in June and got you to sign it.

Just finished "Shadow of the Moon" on the bus this morning. Can't wait to read the next one to find out how Aldrin/Armstrong get home. Heh!

FFrench
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posted 09-17-2007 12:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Tom - indeed, I enjoyed meeting you and many others at that show, and talking about / signing the books.

Hope you enjoyed the rest of "In the Shadow of the Moon" as much as it sounded like you were enjoying the first half!

mdmyer
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posted 09-19-2007 09:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I thought this review of In the Shadow of the Moon was probably one of the best I had read. Check it out.

olddennis
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posted 09-21-2007 08:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for olddennis   Click Here to Email olddennis     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

While visiting San Diego, my wife and I stopped by the Air & Space Museum. Living in the shadow of the Udvar-Hazy air and space museum at Dulles International Airport outside Washington DC, I had wanted to visit this center for several years. It is an incredible place. I read on collectSPACE that Francis French recently became the Education Director of the facility. He not only took the time to meet with us, but he escorted us around the museum and showed us some of the items that most visitors do not get to see. I bought the book he recently coauthored with Colin Burgess, "In the Shadow of the Moon" about the history of our space program from 1965-1969. The attached picture shows Francis autographing his book for me in front of Gumdrop, the command module from Apollo 9. He has the job that all of us wish we could have!!! Thanks again Francis for your hospitality and your time to show us around. Now I have to get back to reading your book...

FFrench
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posted 09-23-2007 12:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you, Dennis! It was a pleasure to meet you both and give you a tour. Looking forward to hearing what you think of the book!

I should mention that I'm not so much signing the book in front of the spacecraft, but on the hatch itself. It appears in one of the most iconic Apollo photos, so seemed like a good place to sign it!

quote:
Originally posted by mdmyer:
I thought this review of In the Shadow of the Moon was probably one of the best I had read.

Thanks Mike, for posting that. That's the kind of review that is just wonderful to read: to see that someone got so much out of reading the book.

divemaster
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posted 09-23-2007 12:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I added my review to Amazon last night [even thought I bought it at B&N - is that legal?]
I must comment once again on the writings of Francis French and Colin Burgess with their second book, In The Shadow of the Moon [with an excellent forward by Apollo 7's Walt Cunningham].

Francis and Colin have this uncanny knack of telling these fantastic stories of 40+ years ago like the happened yesterday. They are written to keep you riveted to the book, and for that, I compliment them. As I mentioned in a review of their first collaboration, this book does NOT read as dry history, but tells the stories in the astronaut's own words.

I was particularly fascinated by the discussions with Apollo 8's Bill Anders. Anders has chosen to stay out of the public spotlight since his 1968 flight, so reading his words was something very new to me and also very interesting. With a son now serving in the Middle East, it drew an interesting similarity between his flight during the Viet Nam war. Anders story, alone, makes the book that much more interesting.

The final six pages of the book dealing with Charlie Duke as Capcom on Apollo 11 also hit a chord with me. We rarely think about what the astronauts who were serving as CapCom in Mission Control might have been thinking - and Duke's thoughts really summed up the entire feel-good feeling that this book presents. Great job!

I hope that part 3 will be coming up soon. I look forward to reading it.

[and I'm glad to see that the book is dedicated to another wonderful person and unsung hero, Dee O'Hara]

cspg
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posted 09-24-2007 03:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My copy arrived today (Sept. 24) miraculously intact! (Amazon does seem to have some wrapping problems for "large" packages that ship from California; other smaller packages come from... New Zealand!).

Looking forward to reading it!

fabfivefreddy
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posted 09-24-2007 11:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fabfivefreddy   Click Here to Email fabfivefreddy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I got my copy from Barnes and Noble in Kansas City. Looks like a great book!

mdmyer
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posted 09-25-2007 09:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This "dual review" has been posted to The Space Review. It is a dual review of the film In the Shadow of the Moon and of Francis and Colin's book of the same title.

I did not really like the play on words about the book being lost in the shadow of the film. It seems, at least on this forum, that the book is more popular. Maybe we are bias through. I have not see the film yet so I can't say which I enjoy the most. The reviewer states that the book takes a fairly standard chronological approach to the history of the manned programs in the two countries but later says the Russian program gets less coverage than the American program. I think the chronological order is maintained; it is just that the Russians were not flying as many manned missions in the late 60s. The reviewer also says no information about the Russian N-1 was given. I think the focus of In the Shadow of the Moon was to tell the stories of the people who were in the space program. The failure of the Russian N-1 was the end of their hopes to beat the Americans to the Moon but I don't think Francis and Colin wrote a book about the race. They wrote a book about the runners.

The review also does not seem to appreciate the contributions of Bill Anders and Rusty Schweickart to the book or of the people who knew Donn Eisele. In my opinion the chapters about Bill, Rusty, and Donn are highlights of this book.

ColinBurgess
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posted 09-26-2007 01:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Tracy, your blood's worth bottling, old mate - thank you so much for those kind words and for posting that great review. And once again thank you to all the collectSPACE people who have been so supportive of this book - it means a lot to me and to Francis, I can assure you.

Tahir, did you buy your copy off the shelf at B&N, or did you have to order it in? Just curious, as we've been wondering when The Big Guys would start placing it on their shelves.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-26-2007 02:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ColinBurgess:
Just curious, as we've been wondering when The Big Guys would start placing it on their shelves.
The B&N nearest to JSC in Houston had your book prominently displayed on the top shelf of its science section (cover facing out, rather than its spine like most other titles) and well stocked (I saw maybe a dozen copies stacked).

divemaster
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posted 09-26-2007 09:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Colin wants to bottle my blood?

I'm afraid you'll have to get in line. I can think of several people who want it more than you do.

I guess I'll take this as a compliment, Count Colin.

MCroft04
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posted 09-26-2007 11:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
The B&N nearest to JSC in Houston had your book prominently displayed...
I also saw it on the shelf here in Houston last night (at B&N I believe). It was hard to resist buying it even though I own a copy.

FFrench
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posted 09-26-2007 04:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, everyone, for letting us know where you saw the book - it's really helpful and much appreciated. And great to hear! It's surprisingly hard to get into those chain bookstores...

Mike, thanks for posting that dual review of both book and movie - very interesting for us to read, as you can imagine - and I also really appreciate your thoughts about what you feel the reviewer perhaps overlooked about our book - thank you. Of course, I'm very pleased that overall he liked both book and movie and thinks they complement each other well (as do I). And I also appreciate you posting those other comparative reviews that look at the book in greater detail.

I have to say, one phrase you say above - "I don't think Francis and Colin wrote a book about the race. They wrote a book about the runners." - is such a wonderfully powerful phrase, and really summarizes what we tried to do - I only wish it could have been thought up earlier, we'd have put it on the back of the book!

Tracy, please allow me to add my thanks to Colin's for that very nice review - and to reassure you that I can only presume (and hope) that "your blood's worth bottling" is some peculiar Australian expression of respect. Certainly, when Colin has visited me, I have seen no (outward) evidence of vampirism, cannibalism or serial killing.

He's more Boris Yeltsin than Boris Karloff.

divemaster
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posted 09-26-2007 07:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, I DID promote him from "Deputy" to "Count" so he'll keep his fangs away.

All kidding aside, I think that the Francis/Colin combination has produced two of the most well written space related books in many years.

mdmyer
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posted 09-27-2007 08:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
I have to say, one phrase you say above - "I don't think Francis and Colin wrote a book about the race. They wrote a book about the runners." - is such a wonderfully powerful phrase, and really summarizes what we tried to do - I only wish it could have been thought up earlier, we'd have put it on the back of the book!
Maybe a future edition? I too wish I could have thought of it earlier. It just came to me when I was writing that paragraph.

FFrench
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posted 09-30-2007 10:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Mike - we have shared the phrase with the publisher, so they know about it.

It's interesting to see too that a Star Wars fan message board had some discussion of this book recently...

I was giving a workshop up at NASA Ames this weekend, and shopped in the (beautiful) Borders in Palo Alto - was really pleased to see both of the books prominently displayed in the science section there. In case anyone who lives around there is interested, I signed all of the copies they had.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-30-2007 10:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
In case anyone who lives around there is interested, I signed all of the copies they had.
Did you ask permission first or did you just pull out a pen and start signing?

(I realize its probably the earlier, but the latter would have been a much better story.)

FFrench
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posted 10-02-2007 10:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Did you ask permission first or did you just pull out a pen and start signing?
While doing some 'guerrilla signing' would certainly be tempting, the bookstore owns those physical copies, so I asked a staff member first...

I did the same at a small bookstore in Coronado a few weeks ago, and they went and got some 'signed by the author' stickers to add to them for their display, so it paid to ask...

mdmyer
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posted 10-05-2007 04:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
While doing some 'guerrilla signing' would certainly be tempting, the bookstore owns those physical copies, so I asked a staff member first...
That story reminded me of a signed book I have in my collection. I have a signed copy of Henry Cooper's Thirteen: The Flight that Failed. The book is personalized to Roger Butterfield who was a Time/Life staff writer who often wrote stories for the Saturday Evening Post. The inscription in this book to Roger from Henry Cooper reads:

To Roger, How much is a signed copy of my book worth??? Usually in a bookshop I sign every copy of my book I can get my hands on so that the bookseller can't return them to the publisher -- but a rare book dealer is something else again. Henry Cooper Jr. Aug 17, 1974.

I guess that is one way to make sure a book is not returned to the publisher.

I have also added the signatures of Apollo 13 CapCom Jack Lousma who added the quote "We're starting to think about the LM lifeboat." and Sy Liebergot who added "OK you guys, we've lost FC 1 and2 pressure".

This is also the book that Sy contributed drawings of the fuel cells flow path to.

It is a neat book.

mdmyer
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Registered: Dec 2003

posted 10-05-2007 04:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mdmyer:
I thought this review of In the Shadow of the Moon was probably one of the best I had read.
Well if one review is good two must be better.

Sy Liebergot
Member

Posts: 458
From: Pearland, Texas USA
Registered: May 2003

posted 10-05-2007 04:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Sy Liebergot   Click Here to Email Sy Liebergot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mdmyer:
That story reminded me of a signed book I have in my collection. I have a signed copy of Henry Cooper's Thirteen: The Flight that Failed... This is also the book that Sy contributed drawings of the fuel cells flow path to.
Knowing his website can be difficult to navigate, FYI Steve Hankow has my New Yorker copies listed for sale, with these words:
These two issues of New Yorker Magazine are dated Nov. 11 & 18, 1972 and between them contain a two part story entitled, "Annals of Exploration - Apollo 13 Accident". Written by Henry S.F. Cooper, these particular magazines are Sy's personal copies and in fact have his former address label affixed. Sy has autographed both Parts I and II in ballpoint on the first page of each installment which by the way is quite lengthy. These magazines are both intact though well read. This is a chance to own the Apollo 13 EECOM's personal copy of article. Incidentally, while this magazine represents the first appearance of Cooper's story, his account was later turned into a book entitled, "Thirteen - The Apollo Flight That Failed" (Dial Press, 1972) and a paperback of same title in 1995. Very nice and rare.

FFrench
Member

Posts: 3093
From: San Diego
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 10-05-2007 11:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mike:
Well if one review is good two must be better.
Thanks Mike, for the signing story and also for posting that review of both books. 5 out of 5 - very pleased! And how interesting to end up in a St. Louis student paper!

MCroft04
Member

Posts: 1219
From: Smithfield, Me, USA
Registered: Mar 2005

posted 10-07-2007 11:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I received this email (see below) this morning from Amazon; thought Francis might enjoy it (sorry Colin). Also, does anyone have any info on this new book "Final Countdown"?
We've noticed that customers who have purchased or rated In the Shadow of the Moon: A Challenging Journey to Tranquility, 1965-1969 (Outward Odyssey: A People's History of S) by Francis French have also purchased Final Countdown: NASA and the End of the Space Shuttle Program by Pat Duggins. For this reason, you might like to know that Final Countdown: NASA and the End of the Space Shuttle Program will be released on October 21, 2007

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27327
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-07-2007 11:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MCroft04:
Also, does anyone have any info on this new book "Final Countdown"?
See: Final Countdown: NASA and the End of the Space Shuttle Program


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