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  In the Shadow of the Moon (Outward Odyssey) (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   In the Shadow of the Moon (Outward Odyssey)
FFrench
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posted 03-09-2007 12:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The University of Nebraska Press has now added the cover design for "In the Shadow of the Moon," by Colin Burgess and myself, on their website.

with a foreword, as you can see, by Walt Cunningham.

Colin and I have been told that the book will be in the press's warehouse in the fall. Using the link above, you can also ask the publisher to notify you when it is available.

This book covers human spaceflight (both Russian and American) from the Gemini missions through to the first manned landing on the Moon. It chronologically begins where our other book, "Into that Silent Sea," ends.

Nevertheless, the two books have been created so that can be read as separate, stand-alone reads.

FFrench
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posted 04-30-2007 10:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There is now an Amazon page for this book with cover image, book description and a pre-release order discount guarantee...

cspg
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posted 05-01-2007 12:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Francis! And one book in the shopping cart, one!

bruce
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posted 05-01-2007 05:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bruce   Click Here to Email bruce     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just pre-ordered mine too!

FFrench
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posted 05-02-2007 08:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks so much for ordering the book, guys!

BMacKinnon
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posted 07-06-2007 08:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for BMacKinnon   Click Here to Email BMacKinnon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
After reading their recent book "Into That Silent Sea", I greatly look forward to the new tales to be told in "In The Shadow Of The Moon". I have found their writing style to be most enjoyable and hard to put down. With all of the first-person interviews they conducted and stories that are being put to print for the first time, this will be a must read for me as it should be for you! Francis and Colin are sure to have once again outdone themselves with another literary endeavour!

FFrench
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posted 07-06-2007 10:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you: I am honored - and I am sure Colin is too - that you chose this thread to be the one to make your very first CollectSpace posting and say such nice things! Welcome!!

tegwilym
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posted 07-06-2007 12:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I better order that one too. I bought Silent Sea, but that is my next book to read after I finish Chaikin's "Man on the moon" which I'm reading for the 2nd or 3rd time!

...such a geek I am.

mdmyer
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posted 07-13-2007 06:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just received an e-mail from Amazon.com saying that my pre-ordered copy of In the Shadow of the Moon has shipped. The estimated delivery date is the 19th of July.

Looking forward to reading it.

robsouth
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posted 07-13-2007 08:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for robsouth     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I hate to point this out but isn't the moon shown on the cover actually the wrong way around?

FFrench
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posted 07-14-2007 01:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Mike! Good to hear that it is shipping so fast.

Good eyes, Rob! Indeed, the original photo will be familiar to many as one taken on Apollo 11's return trip.

The first time humans could look at the moon from up close and think, "I just walked on that surface"... and the Sea of Tranquility is beautifully prominent in the shot.

As those of you who are familiar with the publishing business will know, there are some aspects of the book which the authors have no final control over. While the authors can recommend photos for inside and outside the book, the final decision rests with the publisher. Colin and I made a number of suggestions for the covers of both books. This photo was not one of our choices, but it is very similar to our suggestions, and evocative of the book title and subject.

As you rightly point out, the design team it seems chose to flip the image - presumably to get a more pleasing artistic effect. And it certainly looks beautiful. But given the choice, I would have chosen the more accurate path.

It happens more often than you think - no matter how well-known the author. One recent astronaut autobiography, for example, has as its main cover photo a large image of the subject in their spacesuit. Those familiar with the photo, or who look closely at the NASA patch, may notice that the photo has been reversed.

The irony is, the cover shows how I have often observed details on the moon, as the telescope I looked through had a mirror reversed field. So the image on the cover is actually more familiar to me than in reverse.

To their credit, UNP gave us a much larger degree of freedom when it came to text and photos inside the book than I have heard of with many other publishers. You hear such horror stories from other writers about huge text cuts, but instead we had great copyeditors who helped sharpen the story. The text, of course, was my number one priority. We were given a lot of liberty to tell the stories we wanted to tell.

robsouth
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posted 07-14-2007 02:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for robsouth     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It sounds like a great book to add to any collection. I understand William Anders said he was never going to write a bio so this new book should go some way to providing an insight into his space journey.

FFrench
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posted 07-14-2007 03:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Rob. Knowing your interest in Gordon Cooper's story, which is continued in this book with some more original interviews we conducted with him, I think you'll find it very interesting.

Indeed, Bill Anders is enjoying himself flying airplanes, and told me he has no interest in ever writing a book. The Apollo 8 chapter is told largely from his viewpoint, and he and Valerie Anders were kind enough to invite me to their home for some great, insightful interviews, followed by a lot of proofreading. Very generous and giving people.

cspg
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posted 07-15-2007 01:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mdmyer:
I just received an e-mail from Amazon.com saying that my pre-ordered copy of In the Shadow of the Moon has shipped. The estimated delivery date is the 19th of July.
Mike, lucky you! I guess Amazon's pages do not always reflect the real situation. The book is still to be released on September 1...Go figure! But the Ulivi/Harland's book Robotic Exploration of the Solar System is listed at $39.95 but I bought it when it was 30% off (along with Colin and Francis' In the shadow of the moon).

FFrench
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posted 07-15-2007 03:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If this is anything like the last book, "Into That Silent Sea" - the official release date was April, but copies were shipping as early as February. The official date is chosen, I was told, to ensure all the big suppliers have their copies by the time of the official release date. So shipping in July for an officially-September book would follow that same pattern. I can hope, as I'm looking forward to seeing this one out there too.

And... thanks for ordering it!

pollux
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posted 07-15-2007 02:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for pollux     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mike, Chris, and, of course, Francis

Thanks for the heads-up guys. I too was patiently waiting until September to order. I've now placed my order after seeing the posts here. I'm 2/3 through ITSS (and enjoying every page) so with a little luck "shadow" should arrive here as I turn the last page :-)

ColinBurgess
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posted 07-17-2007 02:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've just returned from a six-week overseas vacation and I'm endeavouring to catch up with personal emails and the hundreds of collectSPACE posts that have accumulated in my absence (a vacation is a vacation - I don't do Internet while we're away). Many thanks to Rob for picking up on that cover anomoly and to Francis for pursuing it with the publishers, who are actually reprinting a new cover for all their stock and future copies. Perhaps those copies with the "negative" moon will one day become collectors' items!

Good to be back, and thanks everyone for those great comments on the two books - my copies of "In the Shadow of the Moon" arrived her four hours after we walked through the door; great timing!

mdmyer
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posted 07-18-2007 06:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I received my copy today. It came from the Amazon distribution center in Coffeyville, Kansas. I had just started to read The Pre-Astronauts but I guess I will have to set that book aside.

mdmyer
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posted 07-19-2007 06:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Miranda was flipping through the book before I had the chance to. She stopped and read your dedication out loud and said "That is neat". What a wonderful tribute and I bet she was touched when you told her about it. Walt Cunningham's foreword is great too and I think his last sentence might explain the theme of the book. Walt wrote "I hope you enjoy getting to know us as individuals in the pages of this book".

I read through the flight of Gemini 3 and I look forward to reading and learning even more.

FFrench
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posted 07-20-2007 12:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great to hear people are already getting it in the mail and reading it. Looking forward to hearing more about what you and Miranda think of it, Mike - great that you like it so far!

The subject of the book dedication doesn't even know about it yet - I am hoping it will be a nice surprise!

Those of you who have it already, or are about to, will presumably have one of the 'reversed covers,' which as Colin says are going to be rather rare, and probably the sign of the very first of the first printed...

One thing I like about this book was the opportunity to take some portrait photos of the spacefarers, such as the ones I took of Gordon Cooper (p.53), Wally Schirra (p.231), Bill Anders (p.324), Rusty Schweickart (p.364) and Charlie Duke (p.407). Of course, the printing process removes much of the subtleties of them, but it was nice to be able to include some original photography. I did the same in the first book with a Leonov shot (P.381).

Rusty Schweickart liked his photo so much that he now uses it on his personal website.

You'll also notice a photo in the book by a certain Robert Pearlman...

mdmyer
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posted 07-20-2007 06:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
The subject of the book dedication doesn't even know about it yet - I am hoping it will be a nice surprise

Please let us know what her reaction is when she finds out. I am sure she will be touched.

FFrench
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posted 07-22-2007 08:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With my first copies of this book in hand, it was a good week to talk to some of the people who had helped us so much with it.

I was asked to visit Jo and Suzy Schirra for other reasons, and Jo asked me for a copy, to go with the first book, that she is currently reading.


The next day, Gene Cernan and Tom Stafford discussed the book with me. Both had not only provided interviews for the book about their Gemini and Apollo flights, but had also proofread their respective chapters when they were in draft form, so it was nice to be able to show them the final product. Cernan, of course, had also provided the foreword for Colin's prior book, "Fallen Astronauts."



E2M Lem Man
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posted 07-24-2007 04:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for E2M Lem Man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Last Saturday, after the astronauts got theirs, I received mine. My full review will be done when I finsh the book. But, that said it will begin: "I got MY Harry Potter!".

Halfway through and it is excellent. It has some very unigue photos but it does need more pictures. As we have lost so many of our heroes, this is the first book series that tells the complete stories of their lives.

Thank you Francis and Colin for your acknowledgements and friendship.

There are so many stories left to tell...

ColinBurgess
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posted 07-25-2007 04:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Many thanks for the compliments and thoughts on the new book, both of which were greatly appreciated. Many unique photographs are in there as you've suggested, but we were unfortunately restricted by the publisher in the number of photographs that could be included in the text - that's why we tried to find some rarely-seen photos (we couldn't succeed in several instances) or include some very recent ones of the spacefarers.

E2M Lem Man
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posted 07-25-2007 02:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for E2M Lem Man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Oh, that's why! Well the pictures you have chosen are great and many have rarely - if ever - seen before. Thanks for answering that for us!

robsouth
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posted 07-25-2007 05:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for robsouth     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When will this book be available to buy in the shops in Australia?

ColinBurgess
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posted 07-25-2007 06:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Knowing through experience the indifference shown by booksellers in major Australian cities to stocking any decent books on spaceflight topics, I certainly wouldn't be holding my breath, Rob. I would instead be ordering a copy through either the publishers (the University of Nebraska Press) or via some reliable provider such as Amazon.

robsouth
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posted 07-25-2007 10:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for robsouth     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I bought my copy of "First Man" in a Dymocks in Sydney so they are out there.

cspg
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posted 07-26-2007 12:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Received the following email:
The University of Nebraska Press is pleased to announce that "In the Shadow of the Moon: A Challenging Journey to Tranquility, 1965-1969" by Francis French and Colin Burgess is now available for purchase.

MCroft04
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posted 07-26-2007 08:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just received my copy yesterday. I swore that I would not abandon the book I was currently reading to start a new publication, but could not resist; presently on ~page 50 and enjoying it!

FFrench
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posted 07-27-2007 12:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's wonderful to hear that we have you so engrossed - thanks for sharing!

If only we could get just a fraction of those Harry Potter sales, Jim...

As for ordering copies in Australia and Switzerland - many bookstores overseas will order US books for you. The book is already listed for sale at Amazon Germany, Canada, UK and Japan, but I have heard of some Europeans and Australians who have already ordered it from Amazon's US site. Not only are they likely to get it faster, there is a great exchange rate right now for most, and the book is also heavily discounted (over ten dollars off) - meaning essentially free postage for some... you may wish to take advantage!!

Thanks again for the kind comments...

cspg
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posted 07-27-2007 12:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Amazon France and UK have a release date of Oct.15 while Germany has a September release date. It's "in stock" at Amazon US but since I bought another book which is not yet released, I guess I'll have to wait a bit longer!

divemaster
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posted 07-27-2007 06:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just got my copy in today's mail from Barnes & Noble. I'm looking forward to a good read!

MCroft04
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posted 07-27-2007 08:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Received my copy this week, and in spite of my thoughts to complete the current book that I'm reading before reading Colin's and Francis's new book, I am very much enjoying their latest prize.

mdmyer
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posted 07-27-2007 09:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was reading The Pre-Astronauts but I put it aside when I received my copy of In the Shadow of the Moon. I just finished reading the chapter The Risk Stuff. It told the story of the Apollo 1 fire and of Komarov. Before reading the account of the Apollo 1 fire in the book In the Shadow of the Moon, my favorite account of the fire was in Lost Moon. I think Francis and Colin really gave a great account of the fire. After detailing the fire the authors told the personal stories from that day of Bob Stevenson, Dee O'Hara, Hank Waddell, Sam Beddingfield, Jerry Griffin, Gene Kranz, Paul Haney, Jack King, Don Gregory, Lola Morrow, and Richard Gordon. Everyone of these people shared their thoughts and feelings of the day.

We are leaving for an extended weekend trip tomorrow morning. I have never taken a book on vacation but In the Shadow of the Moon might just have to go with me.

P.S. Did the lady you dedicated the book to learn about this honor yet?

WAWalsh
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posted 07-27-2007 10:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for WAWalsh   Click Here to Email WAWalsh     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Outstanding news, I now have two books to order this weekend.

FFrench
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posted 07-28-2007 12:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mdmyer:
Did the lady you dedicated the book to learn about this honor yet?
Not yet... their copy is on the way to them, so any day now...

heng44
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posted 07-28-2007 10:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Amazon just sent me a mail to announce that "Into that silent sea" and "In the shadow of the moon" have been shipped... Can't wait!

MCroft04
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posted 07-29-2007 05:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Colin and Francis; I have a question from page 97 regarding the "simple experiment" that Stafford and Cernan attempted on Gemini 9. If they sped up the spacecraft (meaning they fired their thrusters to increase the speed of the spacecraft) wouldn't that place them in a higher orbit, and result in a slower speed relative to the ATDA, and therefore the ADTA would have been below and ahead of them?

I could easily be incorrect, but figure I'll learn something from the question. Also, hope this shows you how closely I am reading your book, and enjoying it word by word!

FFrench
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posted 07-29-2007 06:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, what we are describing in the book is a greatly simplified description of quite a complex maneuver. To keep the attention on the spacefarers themselves, keep the story moving along, and not spent too much time on orbital mechanics, we describe "as ADTA seemed to drop away and under them" - which does not disagree with what you say above, it just does not go into as much detail.

A more detailed version would be, they would nudge Gemini 9 into an elliptical orbit, out of the ADTA's near-circular orbit. The apogee and perigee difference between the two was slight - less than 3 miles - and one in which a small burn indeed took them above and behind the ADTA, as described in the book.

The orbits were such that the spacecraft drew closer together again when Gemini 9 reached its new orbital perigee, at which point a small braking burn helped match the orbits again for a second rendezvous.

There was a lot more to the manuever - Cernan taking sextant sightings, Stafford attempting to view the target optically without relying on radar, working as a team. But not even Stafford and Cernan themselves go into such detail in their own books on this maneuver. Probably, as Colin and I were, thinking that putting too much orbital mechanics in a book designed for the lay reader would scare them off turning any more pages!

The Gemini program is a much overlooked and underrated program in space history. Manuevers like the one we are discussing are ones which gave Apollo vital experience in flying techniques - some for emergencies, such as losing radar. Some techniques were never needed or used again, but they gave NASA a huge amount of experience and confidence in a very short time frame. The number and range of tests of his nature (creating artificial gravity using tethers, for example) is astoundingly broad, and in many instances decades ahead of its time. We had a lot of fun trying to show how vital the program was to solving the mysteries of rendezvous in the prior chapter ('A Rendezvous in Space') and also EVA, in the chapter you are reading ('The Ballet of Weightlessness'). I hope that we did so in a readable and non-technical way, trying to cover very complex events in a simple way, but with the main focus elsewhere - on how the people making these flights themselves thought and felt about the events, and who they were, before and after their flights.

quote:
Originally posted by MCroft04
...hope this shows you how closely I am reading your book, and enjoying it word by word!

I am delighted that you are doing so - and if our book isn't raising questions and making people want to learn more about Gemini (for which there are some great other volumes out there for further reading, listed in our references section) it wouldn't be doing the job we hoped it would do! Thanks so much for the great comments!


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