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  Into That Silent Sea (Outward Odyssey series) (Page 4)

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Author Topic:   Into That Silent Sea (Outward Odyssey series)
FFrench
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posted 07-31-2007 02:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kevmac:
I've read almost every astronaut book that's come out over the last 35 years and this edition, along with my soon-to-be read "Into That Silent Sea" tell the manned space flight story like no books before.
Wow! That's the kind of feedback I am sure every author hopes to hear about their book. Thank you so much for sharing it, and I am really pleased you are enjoying it so much! That's quite a compliment!!

tegwilym
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posted 07-31-2007 04:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kevmac:
I'm taking my time getting thru it, as the book is like a very fine wine that can't be hurried through. I need to take small sips of each chapter and savor the history and never-before-told personal stories.
I'm reading "Silent Sea" right now on the bus to and from work. I get to work drunk, then arrive back home drunk again in the evening!

Lots of stories I've never heard. Yeah, I'm one of those guys that has read everything also. Sounds like "Shadow of the Moon" is another good one. I'll get that next!

heng44
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posted 08-04-2007 03:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just started reading in 'Into That Silent Sea' and it is very well written. Great stories!

Francis and Colin could very well be among the most important spaceflight historians of this moment. And certainly among my favorites...

It is also nice to see so many familiar names in the acknowledgements...

Congratulations, guys! Can't wait for 'In The Shadow Of The Moon'.

heng44
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posted 08-06-2007 01:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am nearing the end of 'Into That Silent Sea' and find it most enjoyable and well-researched. But a question is nagging me since I read the account of the Wostok-5 launch. It is described how cosmonaut Bykovsky had a full bladder before the lift-off, which kept getting postponed. He wanted to get out and relieve himself. But he was about to start a flight a several days: how was waste-management handled in the Wostok spacesuits? I assume these could not be taken off during the flight. And did he get out and relieve himself or didn't he?

FFrench
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posted 08-06-2007 03:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by heng44:
I am nearing the end of 'Into That Silent Sea' and find it most enjoyable and well-researched.

Wonderful to hear that, Ed - thanks! For someone with your depth of knowledge to say such a thing means a lot to me.

quote:
It is described how cosmonaut Bykovsky had a full bladder before the lift-off, which kept getting postponed. He wanted to get out and relieve himself. But he was about to start a flight of several days: how was waste-management handled in the Vostok spacesuits?

Ed, you have actually found one of the very few typos that Colin and I discovered in the final manuscript after publisher copyediting, but that it was too late to amend as the printing presses were rolling. The correct translation of Bykovsky's comment was "open the spacesuit," not "open the spacecraft." Colin and I have it listed with the publisher to be amended for any future editions of the book.

That you found it and it raised this question gives me much confidence that we have found the typos.

As to your larger question - the waste-management capabilities of the Sokol SK-1 spacesuit - I have some paperwork at home I could dig out. But firstly, someone here might have a copy of a book I don't have - Isaac Abramov's "Russian Spaceasuits" - that may provide a far more comprehensive answer than my records.

FFrench
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posted 08-06-2007 04:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by heng44:
Just started reading in 'Into That Silent Sea' and it is very well written. Great stories! Francis and Colin could very well be among the most important spaceflight historians of this moment. And certainly among my favorites...

Goodness - I am overwhelmed by this. You just made my week.

quote:
Congratulations, guys! Can't wait for 'In The Shadow Of The Moon'.

It's shipping from Amazon US if you don't wish to wait!

heng44
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posted 08-07-2007 12:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the reply, Francis. "Opening the spacesuit" sounds very plausible and answers part of the question.

Another thing which 'bothers' me is the remark by Paul Haney in the foreword about the Woskhod-2 crew contacting mission control at the Cape and Leonov talking with them in good English. Does he remember that correctly? I can't recall hearing that story before, but it could be in the Kranz or Kraft books. But in the final chapter it is said that Leonov did not speak English before the ASTP mission. Just something that I was wondering about...

cspg
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posted 08-07-2007 12:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Woskhod-2 with a "W"? Is this an "Ed" posting typo or has the spelling changed? (Voskhod)?

heng44
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posted 08-07-2007 12:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sorry Chris, this is a case of mixing Dutch and English. In Dutch the media wrote 'Wostok' and 'Woschod'. Yes, with ch.

ColinBurgess
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posted 08-07-2007 02:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ed, if I was a lot shyer in personality you'd see my head down and the embarrassed shuffling of feet, and an oft-repeated "Aw, shucks!" But I'm an Aussie (which says a lot!) However, all joking aside, compliments such as this mean a lot to both of us after years of hard work and diligent research on the books, and particularly when they come from someone so highly regarded in the space community, not only for your awesome work in collating and sharing space images, but for your extraordinarily beautiful and evocative paintings. Many thanks, Ed - much appreciated.

Re those Haney comments, I've asked Paul if he can elaborate for me. In his foreword he says he's not sure if it was Leonov, but I doubt that it could have been any of the other four Voskhod guys. I'll let you know what he says.

heng44
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posted 08-07-2007 03:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Colin and Francis, now it's my turn to blush.

cspg
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posted 08-07-2007 08:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
It's shipping from Amazon US if you don't wish to wait!

To what extent "shipping" and "don't have to wait" should go hand in hand is up for discussion. I've got "In the Shadow of the Moon" with two other books which are "in stock", yet they won't ship until early September...go figure! (well, I can imagine exhausted amazon workers shipping Harry Potter books...we'll have to come after the frenzy settles down!). No big deal, as long as the book(s) are shipped...

FFrench
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posted 08-07-2007 02:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
I've got "In the Shadow of the Moon" with two other books which are "in stock", yet they won't ship until early September...go figure!

Sorry to hear that - we're hearing of others getting it immediately. Perhaps an issue with one of the other 'in stock' books?

FFrench
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posted 08-07-2007 09:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by heng44:
how was waste-management handled in the Vostok spacesuits?

There's a good overview on P.98-99 of Rex Hall and David Shayler's excellent book "The Rocket Men" - hope this helps too.

freedom7
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posted 08-07-2007 11:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for freedom7   Click Here to Email freedom7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I received the delay notice from Amazon as well for "In the Shadow of the Moon. It's listed as "In stock" but will not ship until September 6. The form letter Amazon sent said something to the effect that they can't anticipate when deliveries will arrive from publishers. I can accept that, but they shouldn't still list it as "In stock".

This was the only item on my order.

I was looking forward to beginning reading it last weekend, but Sept. 6 is my BD, so it will be a nice present!

The first volume was the best space history I've read. I'm a librarian and I immediately ordered a copy for my library as well.

FFrench
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posted 08-07-2007 11:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by freedom7:
It's listed as "In stock" but will not ship until September 6.

Thanks for that info. I recall a few messages people got like that for the first book, and they ended up getting it earlier - so let's hope for the same here. And if not, at least we are talking about less than a month, still a very good discounted price - and glad to hear we can give you a timely birthday present!

quote:
The first volume was the best space history I've read. I'm a librarian and I immediately ordered a copy for my library as well.

Wow. That's such wonderful feedback - thank you. Colin and I were just talking also about a review that appeared on the Amazon page for the book from David Shomper, a Gemini and Apollo engineer. Feedback like yours and his means so much.

cspg
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posted 08-08-2007 09:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
Sorry to hear that - we're hearing of others getting it immediately. Perhaps an issue with one of the other 'in stock' books?
Amazon didn't bother to explain the reason(s) why- only informing me that the book will ship on Sept.5. I think it has more to do with the accuracy of information displayed on amazon's pages than anything else. They probably had a first batch of copies but now they're waiting for the second one! I think I'll survive!

Jay Gallentine
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posted 08-08-2007 07:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Gallentine   Click Here to Email Jay Gallentine     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just checked the Minneapolis/St. Paul Hennepin County Library online catalog, and it reports four copies of 'Silent Sea' circulating in our system. Two are checked out right now; unfortunately no one has posted any feedback or comments.

Just thought I'd pass that along.

FFrench
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posted 08-09-2007 12:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Gallentine:
it reports four copies of 'Silent Sea' circulating in our system. Two are checked out right now

Great, thanks - good to hear libraries are buying them and people are reading them!

One thing I was particularly pleased to learn is that a copy resides in both the NASA HQ library in DC and the Korolev Museum in Russia.

FFrench
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posted 08-12-2007 12:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Colin and I have been given an extreme honor. The engineer who was in charge of the Q-ball cover retraction system for Apollo 11 liked this book so much, he decided to give us both a piece of the Q-ball cover - the very, very top of the stack as the Saturn V sat on the launch pad. It survived launch, but with some wonderfully historic scorching all over it! We're both deeply honored by this gift.

DavidH
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posted 08-17-2007 08:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidH   Click Here to Email DavidH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm no good at doing reviews. But I promised I would write one, so here goes.

I have finally, shamefully late, finished reading 'Into That Silent Sea' by Francis French and Colin Burgess, the first book in the Outward Odyssey series.

Almost a year ago, I had the pleasure of having dinner with Francis French at a local German restaurant, and we discussed our respective entries in the Outward Odyssey series. I told him that, while I was probably unusual in this respect, my thoughts on writing about the era covered in Silent Sea and its follow-up, In the Shadow of the Moon, was "Better you than me."

Yes, it would be a fun sandbox to play in, and, yes, it would be very cool to get to talk to the people you would have to interview to write the book.

But, it's been done, you know?

The Gemini period perhaps a bit less so, but how many books and movies and documentaries have covered the Mercury and Apollo programs? No, I'll stick with something a bit more fresh, like, say, Skylab, thanks.

But the great thing about Silent Sea is that it is, in fact, fresh.

For the people who are relatively new to these stories, it's a wonderful introduction. To say that it's thorough is putting it lightly. Yes, the Mercury program is covered completely. The book includes everything you need to know. And it's told in a way that's interesting not only to a technical crowd but also to a lay audience, because, ultimately, Silent Sea is the story of the people who lived the history. These people who have become legends, after all, were people. Where did they come from? What were they like as children? How did they get to the point where they were making history? What was the experience like for them? What was it like living with having done something so exceptional? With the aforementioned thoroughness, Silent Sea paints portraits of the individuals behind the history.

Silent Sea is unusual, as well, in that it's not a history of the Mercury program. It's a history of human spaceflight from 1961 through 1965, regardless of where those humans were from. The U.S. and Soviet programs are covered in a combined chronological account, presenting the stories side-by-side as two components of one historical period. As a result, even for someone who is fairly well-versed in the history of NASA spaceflight, Silent Sea is an extremely informative volume, filling in the gaps from the far side of the Iron Curtain.

Even in telling the more familiar stories, however, Silent Sea keeps it fresh. No matter how many times a reader has heard these stories, they haven't been told in quite this way before. Yes, the major events are covered in detail, but they're shown as seen through different eyes, people like Dee O'Hara and Wally Funk. If you know who those people are, you know why you need to read the book. If you don't know who those people are, that is why you need to read the book.

ColinBurgess
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posted 08-17-2007 11:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As commonly known in space forums, I was given the great honour of being appointed series editor for the Outward Odyssey set of ten books to be published over a five-year period by the University of Nebraska Press. While I co-authored the first two books, I was also given the task of seeking out suitable authors for the remaining eight books in the series - a pleasurable but responsible task which is happily nearing officially sanctioned completion.

I was absolutely delighted when David Hitt and Owen Garriott accepted the task of taking on the much-anticipated Skylab book. Soon after, Joe Kerwin became another eager participant, joining in as a third author. David has lavished praise on "Into That Silent Sea," so by way of reciprocating I must point out that I have now read the unedited manuscript submitted by this august trio, and I can report that it is not only brilliant, but is destined to become the definitive book on this remarkable program. David is a proven and superb writer with a great turn of phrase, and he has both organised and pulled this book together in magnificent fashion. Meanwhile Owen and Joe have not only been involved in the writing process, but have solicited the assistance of the other six surviving Skylab crewmembers, making this a must-read book for any spaceflight enthusiast. Additionally, Alan Bean graciously offered his personal diary notes from his Skylab mission, fully reproduced in print form in the book. This particular volume is, I believe, destined to become a classic among non-fiction space books, and David will deservedly suffer a chronic case of writer's cramp from signing copies once it is released next year.

This may be perceived by many as a mere case of mutual online admiration, but as David has offered up so many kind words on the first book and the series as a whole, then in my capacity as series editor I feel it only fair to pre-warn you that one of the finest books on human spaceflight ever written is now undergoing the early phase of the publication process in Nebraska. I, for one, can't wait to see it on the shelves, and it will certainly not be the last such book to bear David's name.

DavidH
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posted 08-17-2007 01:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidH   Click Here to Email DavidH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Goodness, now the book is destined to be a disappointment. "Yeah, it was OK," our eventual readers will no doubt think, "but it certainly didn't live up to Colin's build-up for it."

Seriously, thanks so much for the kind words. I am rather pleased with what we have; which is not pride on my part, other than at having been blessed to have worked with some wonderful people.

FFrench
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posted 08-18-2007 12:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'd like to add my thanks for your very kind words, David - and to second Colin's words about the book, having read a draft of it. It is incredible, with unique personal insights from key participants, and will make people appreciate the Skylab program in a whole new way.

ColinBurgess
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posted 09-01-2007 07:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just a Thank You note to regular cS poster Tom Gwilym for posting his wonderful review of this book on Amazon. It is always a pleasant surprise for both of us to read such reviews, and it is amazing to note that we have garnered 14 positive reviews for the book thus far, all of them giving it a five-star rating. Thank you for the nice surprise review, Tom, and thank you once again to everybody for this wonderful support, which is truly appreciated.

icarkie
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posted 09-03-2007 03:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for icarkie   Click Here to Email icarkie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well guys it's took me a couple of months to get through one of the most interesting books I've read. (While on my holiday I got stuck into it).

I've read some good space books over the last few years (Colin's Fallen Astronauts is one as he knows) but this one is up there in my top 5.

I like the bit when Titov went round to the Glenns for a BBQ

Well done Colin and Francis, keep up the good work.

I've gone and ordered through Amazon In The Shadow of The Moon (when it will come I don't know) So I'll be looking fwd to the next book guys.

FFrench
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posted 09-04-2007 12:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by icarkie:
I've read some good space books over the last few years (Colin's Fallen Astronauts is one as he knows) but this one is up there in my top 5.

Thanks so much for those amazingly kind words, Ian! Great to hear.

Out of curiosity, would you be willing to share your list of the top 5 or so space books (in no particular order)?

icarkie
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posted 09-04-2007 09:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for icarkie   Click Here to Email icarkie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Like I said Francis I've read a few good Astro books over the years. Although it's been a few years now DEKE is still my # 1 read, with A Man on The Moon, Fallen Astronauts, The Last Man on The Moon (hoping Gene will sign it in a few months time here in the UK ), Into That Silent Sea just pushing For Spacious Skies out my top 5 ('not arf pop pickers').

FFrench
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posted 09-05-2007 12:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wow, that is one hell of a top 6 you have us joining - a pretty hallowed hall for me... hope we truly live up to that. Thank you!

And you even threw in an Alan "Fluff" Freeman reference!

mdmyer
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posted 09-05-2007 12:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And the great reviews keep coming in. Check out this one.

FFrench
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posted 09-07-2007 04:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Mike, for posting that link to that review. Evans, the reviewer, does a number of reviews and articles for the National Space Society, many of which end up on Space.com, so it is great to see that review.

FFrench
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posted 09-25-2007 02:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A very nice and unexpected surprise at work today - Jim Lewis, the helicopter recovery pilot for Liberty Bell 7, dropped by my workplace out of the blue today, along with his wife. Jim is a familar face to those who attend the Sims-Hankow autograph shows, and it was a great pleasure to see him again.

His story is one told in "Into That Silent Sea," and he signed a couple of copies for my co-workers who had the book. One, another helicopter veteran, didn't have a copy yet, but immediately made a dash to the store to get Jim to sign one - it was fun to listen to them exchange piloting stories. He definitely made the guy's week.

mdmyer
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posted 09-25-2007 08:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Jim and his wife are some of my favorite people to talk to at the autograph shows. They told me that Jim was working on an autobiography so maybe he will be signing a book for you some day Francis.

FFrench
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posted 09-26-2007 03:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Indeed, I'm really looking forward to a Jim book too - we concentrated most on his Liberty Bell 7 stories, but he has a wealth of great space experiences all throughout his career. For example, looking at the Apollo 9 CM here, he was telling me about when he was inside it when they were doing fit checks, lowering an LM onto it... he was involved in the space program all the way through to space station design.

bruce
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posted 09-27-2007 05:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bruce   Click Here to Email bruce     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Earlier this week, my new issue of Air & Space magazine arrived and, lo and behold, just across the page from a review for The Right Stuff DVD set, there is a fantastic review for "Into That Silent Sea"! From someone who spent 20+ years in the music biz, I'd say that's almost like having a 5 star review of your LP in Rolling Stone magazine right next to a Beatles reunion article!

Congratulations Francis and Colin!

cspg
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posted 09-28-2007 12:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bruce, what issue would that be? I thought I just had received the September issue... the November one is already out? If so, Time does actually fly (and I'm late in my readings!).

cspg
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posted 09-28-2007 04:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Okay, I could have turned to their web site... but it kind of kills all the fun of receiving the magazine and discovering its contents..

FFrench
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posted 10-01-2007 03:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Bruce! It was a wonderful surprise for us too - we'd been hoping for a review in there, but after so much time I'd given up. So to get a whole page, and then to also have it reviewed by Martin Collins (space history curator at the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum) was wonderful!

For those of you who don't get the magazine but who may wish to browse it at the magazine stand, it's on page 80 of the November issue - which also happens to have some great X-15 stories, Soviet space program history and other good stuff.

ColinBurgess
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posted 10-09-2007 05:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In this 50th anniversary month of the Space Race, the University of Nebraska Press is generously offering a 25% discount on their range of space exploration books. This includes "Into That Silent Sea" as well as In the Shadow of the Moon, and two earlier space books of mine, "Fallen Astronauts" and "Teacher in Space." In addition, they are offering the quality paperback edition of "A Journal for Christa" by Christa McAuliffe's mother, Grace Corrigan.

Full details of these offers can be found here.

bruce
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posted 10-09-2007 10:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bruce   Click Here to Email bruce     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In addition to "Into That Silent Sea" and "In The Shadow of the Moon", I would highly recommend both "Fallen Astronauts" and "Teacher in Space". They all have many, many stories you didn't know and contain lots of things you just won't read anywhere else.

Colin, please make sure my agent's check comes to the usual Post Ofice Box per our arrangement!


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