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  Into That Silent Sea (Outward Odyssey series) (Page 2)

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Author Topic:   Into That Silent Sea (Outward Odyssey series)
FFrench
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posted 02-19-2007 08:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the updates, everyone - and for ordering the book!

With an official April release date, done partly so the big sellers can get their stock in and ready, I guess there is going to be a bit of a discrepancy this month in who is shipping, and when. It sounds like the current state of play is:

For Europe and other overseas unless you want to order from a US website and pay the shipping - Amazon UK, France, Germany, Canada and Japan all list it - some in stock, some pre-order. the closer we get to April, I'm sure, the more of them will list it for immediate shipping.

Thanks again, everyone, for your support!

cspg
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posted 02-22-2007 08:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've ordered my copy from Amazon.com and it has now entered the "shipping soon" step - although the delivery date is still May 3-14 for some obscure reason (mid-March is more likely, at least based on previous orders - time to cross the Atlantic!).

MCroft04
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posted 02-22-2007 11:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Received my copy from Amazon yesterday. I've only read the Forward so far but already seems like a great book. And how often can one say "hey, I've met the authors"!

DavidH
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posted 02-22-2007 05:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidH   Click Here to Email DavidH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Books-A-Million's Web site also says the book is now shipping. Hopefully mine will arrive soon, to join the two other Colin Burgess books that arrived at my house this week (Oceans to Orbit and Animals In Space).

FFrench
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posted 02-22-2007 05:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks David! That is actually a pretty good discounted price at that site -- almost (but not quite) as good as Amazon's right now. Depending on how much they charge for shipping, might even be better when all totalled.

Thanks to everyone for the feedback on when it is shipping.

quote:
Received my copy from Amazon yesterday. I've only read the foreword so far but already seems like a great book. And how often can one say "hey, I've met the authors"!

That's great to hear - look forward to hearing what you make of the rest of it!

FFrench
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posted 02-22-2007 10:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Colin and I have been getting a couple of copies into the hands of those who helped us most with the book. A couple of days ago, Colin met with Walt and Dot Cunningham in Sydney and gave them a copy. And today, Wally Schirra invited me over to his home to drop a copy off — and he has a message for you too...

MCroft04
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posted 02-23-2007 11:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm not sure if this question is appropriate here, but I'll give it a try. Keep in mind that I know nothing about book publishing. I'm curious if the $ amount that we pay for this book impacts what Colin and Francis make off the book. If I purchase it at the low Amazon price, do Colin and Francis get less profit? I remember Walt Cunningham once talking about his book, and he said that it was definitely not the best financial investment that he's made (given the amount of time that he spent writing it). I want Colin and Francis (and others) to continue writing about space exploration, and my guess is that if they can't make money doing so, they would stop. So if purchasing the book at a higher price puts more money into the pockets of the authors, I'm all for it.

FFrench
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posted 02-23-2007 06:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MCroft04:
I'm curious if the $ amount that we pay for this book impacts what Colin and Francis make off the book. If I purchase it at the low Amazon price, do Colin and Francis get less profit?

The short answer is - probably. As we authors make a percentage of net sales, and larger deals with sellers such as with Amazon are generally done at a more advantageous rate for that seller, we'll probably see less money from those sales.

quote:
I want Colin and Francis (and others) to continue writing about space exploration, and my guess is that if they can't make money doing so, they would stop. So if purchasing the book at a higher price puts more money into the pockets of the authors, I'm all for it.

I want to thank you for that most charitable and supportive statement - one of the most selfless things I have heard someone say in a long time!

But let me tell you my priorities. I never wrote these two books to make money. Other far more well-established authors here will tell you, unless you have a top-seller, there is generally not a huge amount of money to be made writing books. And when you add up the years of researching and writing time, the balance sheet definitely doesn't look good from a profits point of view.

We wrote this book because we felt there were some important stories to be told. Stories of cosmonauts that few in the west knew the truth about. Stories of astronauts that have been told incorrectly in the past. And stories of lesser-known key figures who worked behind the scenes to make the space program a success. It was a fascinating detective story to put it all together into a readable, enjoyable narrative.

Along the way, we were invited into the homes and lives of the spacefarers, and have some unfortgettable memories and new friends as a result. It's hard to know what kind of dollar value to put on that.

I know Colin feels the same way. In fact, if you buy his "Teacher in Space" book, all royalties go to the Christa McAuliffe Fund.

So I'm letting people know about discounted prices, etc. on this thread because, above everything, we want people to read this book. If a cheaper price is the difference between them buying it or not, then it is worth it. And if you're hoping it does well and we keep writing them, the way you could help is - spread the word. Write a positive review on the various Amazon (US, UK etc.) and Barnes & Noble sites for the book. Tell friends, NSS chapters, colleagues inside and outside of the space-interest world. Any media contacts you may have. The more we can get the word out about it, the more publishers will want follow-up books.

Thanks so much again!!

cspg
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posted 02-24-2007 01:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MCroft04:
So if purchasing the book at a higher price puts more money into the pockets of the authors, I'm all for it.
I agree with you 100%. I guess that the authors/publishers make less money when going through retail giants like amazon (that's why Apogee Books is moving aways from them). I would have purchased my copy directly from the Universiry of Nebraska but I don't know anything about them and their shipping rates don't make much difference than amazon (yes, amazon may offer a 30% discount but for me, living overseas, that dicount is eaten but by the order fee and postage costs.) I prefer Amazon because a) I never had a problem with them for the last 10 years, b) books arrive well-packaged and "rapidly" (at least nowadays - back in 97, the first book I bought took 13 weeks to reach my place!), c) I combine orders with books unavailable elsewhere. So I guess it's more practical for me to do it this way. But I would prefer to see the authors get more money as an encouragement to publish more books!

Philip
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posted 02-24-2007 08:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Making money writing a book? LOL... Arranging the copyrights for a 12 page photo section costs minimum US $2500

I'm writing because I enjoy it and learn a huge amount of details while doing so.

RocketmanRob
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posted 02-24-2007 11:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for RocketmanRob   Click Here to Email RocketmanRob     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As a follow-up to my earlier posting indicting that Amazon would only ship the book in April - well Amazon was wrong. My book showed up during the middle of this week 4 days after ordering it. No problems at all. Looking forward to reading it.

Francis and Colin, congrats on what looks to be a great book.

FFrench
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posted 02-25-2007 12:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks! Great to hear Amazon are shipping fast, and looking forward to hearing what you think of the book!

cspg
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posted 02-25-2007 01:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
J.K. Rowling probably disagrees with you, Philip! ;)

The thing is that "space" books (or the way they are presented) do not appeal to a large audience (too technical, specialized etc.). It's a sad thing.

Philip
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posted 02-25-2007 03:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Indeed Chris... then again, J.K. Rowling doesn't have to cope with a photo section.

Jay Gallentine
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posted 03-05-2007 09:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Gallentine   Click Here to Email Jay Gallentine     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My copies of 'Silent Sea' and 'Animals in Space' arrived today via Amazon. I was able to make it halfway through Gagarin's chapter while waiting for the dentist.

I'm struck by the quality of both, the look and feel. Tons of pictures in the 'Animals' book. Great job, guys!

I was going to ask Colin directly, but maybe everyone would be interested in hearing - the collaboration between you two. How did it ultimately work out, with one writer in California and the other in Sydney? When was the distance ever an issue? Just curious.

MCroft04
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posted 03-05-2007 10:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm half way through the book, and am enjoying every page. I wish I could have read this book before talking to Pavel Popovich in San Antonio. But what I am most impressed with so far is the editing. Not a single mistake yet that I've seen!

ColinBurgess
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posted 03-05-2007 11:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Jay, several years ago it would have been a harrowing, drawn-out affair to write books such as "Into That Silent Sea," "Animals in Space" and "NASA's Scientist-Astronauts" with co-authors situated in California, Philadelphia and London respectively. E-mail communication has made things infinitely easier, as we would sometimes communicate several times a day. Imagine trying to do that today with air mailed letters! It's not quite as easy as sitting on either side of a table, but it's darned close.

The first elements in such a collaboration are trust and friendship, because often the pressures associated with what you are doing can unintentionally put you on shaky communication ground. That's when you bite down on your finger, smile, shrug and get on with the business at hand.

With both American co-authors, Francis and Chris, our individual goals were set as to what we would like to tackle in the book, but whatever input we could offer the other person was immediately given. The hardest part is in trading drafts and being brutally honest with each other in regard to content and prose. We would set out alternative text in red where we perceived any difficulties in the draft text, and of course if we saw any obvious factual errors these would be notified. Both authors have to face the fact from the outset that they are not perfect, and this is why there is a great advantage in having a co-author not only very knowledgeable in the subject who has good established contacts and a fine reputation in the spaceflight community, but one possessing excellent grammatical and punctuation skills, combined with a nice turn of phrase. This method of editing not only higlights problems in the text, but when remedied leads to a seamlessness in the text that makes it very difficult for the reader to pick which writer did what and where.

Any costs involved in researching the book are generally shared or quietly borne, and this has never been an issue in any co-authored books I've been involved with over many years.

Writing a book with someone else and sharing that experience with them, both the joys and travails, is an incredibly worthwhile experience, but don't go anywhere near it if you or your writing partner happens to be precious about their own writing and wants to close their ears to any criticism.

I am sure there must have been many other writing collaborations that have ended in frustration, anger and tears, but so far (touch wood) that has not happened to me. Maybe just a very loud AAAUUUGHHHH!!!! on the odd occasion.

I'm currently working with yet another co-author on another non-fiction space book, but as it has not yet been placed under contract (it will be) no details can be offered at this time. But we are old mates, and I'm sure it will be an equally fine experience.

Meanwhile, keep an eye out soon for news of another book in the University of Nebraska Press's Outward Odyssey series that I co-wrote with Francis French, "In the Shadow of the Moon: A Challenging Journey to Tranquility." It will be out in the fall.

P.S. And thanks to Mel Croft for those kind words about the book.

Chris Dubbs
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posted 03-06-2007 07:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Chris Dubbs   Click Here to Email Chris Dubbs     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Perhaps there's another book in this experience, one on cyber collaboration. I am just old enough (60) to continually marvel at our new cyber world. To think that Colin and I wrote "Animals in Space" without ever having met or spoken with each other. Twenty years ago, I could not have had as much contact with someone across town as I had via email with Colin, across the globe, while writing this book. Of course, that cyber contact goes as well for the research and writing: tapping into the bountiful files of NASA and the vast resources of the Internet, contacting individuals, sharing drafts with sympathetic friends, and of course, the occasional appeal for help to cS.

I am a convert. I bought myself a new laptop and a 2 gig flash stick/memory stick/usb thing-a-ma-bob. I'm already working on the next book, this time alone. I must say, it's not as much fun.

FFrench
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posted 03-06-2007 06:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Gallentine:
I was able to make it halfway through Gagarin's chapter while waiting for the dentist.

Hope it was more pleasant than dental work!

Great to hear you and others are enjoying it so far... looking forward to hearing more!

quote:
the collaboration between you two. How did it ultimately work out, with one writer in California and the other in Sydney? When was the distance ever an issue?

Colin has pretty much said it all... but I'll add a couple of thoughts. When it came to co-authoring a single piece of text, it was almost easier to do it electronically and remotely than it would have been in person. We'd both agreed on a general outline of what we wanted to cover, and over time we could narrow that down, refine it, amend it and take advantage of newly-discovered information, all by discussing the project electronically.

We generally took on a chapter as our own to write an initial draft, while also including a good deal of factual input from the others' sources and archives. Once this was accomplished, there were a lot of chapter drafts going back and forth via E-mail as we made suggested amendments, which could be as small as a comma and as large as a new part of the chapter we felt needed to be added to round out the story (or a cut, for similar reasons). Even when we had agreed on a chapter draft, we had others proofread them for grammar, as well as space historian colleagues plus, in many cases, the spacefarers themselves.

"Finished" chapters would sometimes receive minor amendments later in the process as new information came to light.

As Colin says, it was important to put ego aside and be very honest with each other. Sometimes each of us had a favorite nugget of information that we wanted to see in the book, but that really didn't belong in the flow of the story. It's important to accept a valued outsider's point of view and let it go. This included not only the co-author, but also the others who were reading and making suggestions.

Similarly, each of us had writing style quirks that we'd joke with each other about and amend, so we could pull together a book that doesn't read like two different voices. It was valuable, also, to identify and avoid 'lazy phrases' that are all too easy to overuse.

Colin was over in the US quite a lot and we did meet up frequently, but it was rare that we used that time to do any chapter-reading or editing. Normally we'd reflect on where we were with the project, swap some printed source materials, and use the time to socialize or occasionally conduct new joint interviews.

Even if I ever wrote a book solo (and my next book project will once again be co-authoring) I can't imagine not sending drafts to colleagues to proofread. It only makes the book better to have those valued outside eyes.

Jay Gallentine
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posted 03-07-2007 10:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Gallentine   Click Here to Email Jay Gallentine     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Francis, that's very interesting to hear about. 'Leave your ego at the door' is a valuable piece of advice in almost any endeavor.

I would envision that in a collaboration you have someone who is sort of pressing the pace - keeping your nose on the work, if only in perception. I bet many a day began with, "Oh no, I bet he wrote 2 pages yesterday, and I only got through 2 paragraphs!" And to the computer you go.

There must also be something in the collaboration that 'pulls' the two of you along. That is, when one is perhaps jammed up trying to work through a tough section, the support and encouragement (and possibly the rescue!) by the other is of great assistance in untangling the tangles and getting you back on track. I guess I would liken it to two guys running a marathon together, each sort of mentally pulling the other one along.

And yeah, 'Silent Sea' comes off as infinitely more pleasant than dental work, although my dentist sure missed her calling as a supermodel.

FFrench
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posted 03-08-2007 10:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jay : I would envision that in a collaboration you have someone who is sort of pressing the pace - keeping your nose on the work, if only in perception. I bet many a day began with, "Oh no, I bet he wrote 2 pages yesterday, and I only got through 2 paragraphs!" And to the computer you go.

I don't recall ever feeling something like that. We wanted to give the project time to be finished correctly, and while there was a sense that I had to devote many weekends to it to put in enough time, I don't recall comparing how far each of us had come.

Things changed, too, as we began writing the original proposal with a slightly different book idea in mind - then it was amended and accepted in new form - then, as the publisher became more and more excited, it became two books, then two books as part of a wider commisssioned space history series... the whole project just kept getting bigger and more interesting!

bruce
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posted 03-08-2007 04:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bruce   Click Here to Email bruce     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Francis and Colin, I have just finished your book. You guys really did a fantastic job, not only in bringing to the fore many otherwise never to be enjoyed stories, but you also managed to maintain a keen, intrinsic sense of "wonderment" about the human experience in space. I haven't seen an example of writing like this since Andy Chaikin's "A Man On The Moon" book.

I especially enjoyed the present day comments shared by those who were there when those historical events happened. The Cosmonaut chapters were beautifully done as well!

This book is just a joy to read! Thanks for all of your great work!

FFrench
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posted 03-08-2007 09:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bruce: I haven't seen an example of writing like this since Andy Chaikin's "A Man On The Moon" book.

Thank you, Bruce - you just made my week!

I vividly recall sitting in a back garden in London and reading Chaikin's book, and with each page my impresssion of the manned lunar program altered... for good.

Similarly, Tom Wolfe's book shot me into a whole new understanding and impression of astronauts when I was an early teen.

In the last couple of weeks, we have had this comment from you, and Paul Haney tell us "The book is tremendous. It's 'The Right Stuff' only in more detail and feeling."

Two such comparisons are just mindblowingly wonderful, and I thank you!

MCroft04
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posted 03-08-2007 10:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Francis, Colin, there is at least one other person who feels the same way. I hope you keep writing!

ColinBurgess
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posted 03-08-2007 10:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Many thanks, Bruce and Mel; kind words indeed. One of our greatest fears was that we might lose a couple of these wonderful space pioneers in the course of researching and writing the book, and that did happen with the passing of Gordon Cooper, although late in the proceedings. Francis and I had both met Gordo and Suzi, and they were really enthusiastic about the book. Gordo had supplied anecdotal information for his chapter, and readily agreed to go through the draft for us to ensure complete authenticity. Sadly, although he received the draft, Suzi said he did not have a chance to go through it before we suddenly lost him.

As Francis mentioned, this book was so big in manuscript form that the publishers wisely decided to make it into two volumes, so you'll note that when "In the Shadow of the Moon" is released in the fall, it basically continues the story up to Apollo 11. If anything, there are even more revealing stories in the second volume, and the Donn Eisele story is going to surprise many people.

Thanks again for all the kind comments.

FFrench
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posted 03-09-2007 09:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Another nice piece of news:

Dr. Roger Launius, of the Division of Space History at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, and former NASA Chief Historian, has a list on Amazon.com called "Essential Reading in the History of Human Spaceflight." I was delighted to see that he has added our book to it!

The list is accessible via the Amazon.com page for the book.

FFrench
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posted 03-10-2007 05:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Colin Burgess:
One of our greatest fears was that we might lose a couple of these wonderful space pioneers in the course of researching and writing the book, and that did happen with the passing of Gordon Cooper, although late in the proceedings.

The same happened with Andrian Nikolayev, who passed away after the chapter chronicling his first flight had been completed. We were lucky in that we'd managed to have all the queries we wanted to put to him answered in the prior year. We have also lost one other valued contributor in the last year, who I can't name... but I miss them.

It really brings home just how important it is to capture this spaceflight era while we can. And Gordo was a great help, agreeing to a couple of very helpful interviews. There are original recountings of his in both books, including his Apollo 10 work, and training with Donn Eisele. I doubt anyone was expecting some new stories from Gordo in 2007, so hopefully these will come as a pleasant and informative surprise to many.

quote:
when "In the Shadow of the Moon" is released in the fall, it basically continues the story up to Apollo 11. If anything, there are even more revealing stories in the second volume

A link to that book is now here.

Steven Kaplan
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posted 03-11-2007 09:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Steven Kaplan   Click Here to Email Steven Kaplan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am about 1/3 through the book, and it's a great read. The authors have uncovered some real factual gems that go a long way towards showing that these were real people performing all these wonderful exploits. The book really shows the human side of those involved, and I can't wait to finish the book.

cspg
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posted 03-12-2007 06:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My copy arrived today (March 12) in a miraculously way! I've never seen such a sloppy package from Amazon.com. It's a miracle that the books were not damaged.

Maybe the question has been asked before so I apologize but was there any good reason why not include an index at the end of the book?

FFrench
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posted 03-12-2007 12:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
was there any good reason why not include an index at the end of the book?
Very pleased to hear that copies are shipping in Europe now, well ahead of the date they were stating, and that yours arrived in good condition.

The index was something that Colin and I were happy to do for this book, but it was a decision of the publishers. As the book follows the spacefarers chronologically, fortunately it's pretty easy to find what you are looking for.

cspg
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posted 03-13-2007 02:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How strange that the publishers did want to include an index...

For a 10-book series meant to be a chronological account of the space age aimed at a large audience (who may not be familiar with who first flew and when), I found it very, very strange. Even more so that I expected to be some sort of reference series! (geee, I really must lower my expectations).

I look forward to reading it as soon as I'm done with Brian Harvey's Soviet and Russian Lunar Exploration (which was formerly entitled: "Comparisons between the American and Soviet race to the Moon" or something of the kind- don't remember the exact name; I certainly posted it on the forum, though!), a very interesting book.

ColinBurgess
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posted 03-13-2007 02:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I also found it strange, and as Series Editor I consulted with the Managing Director of the publishers on this issue, but he said that it was common practice not to include indexes in many books these days and it had been decided that in keeping with this there would not be an index in any of the books in the Outward Odyssey series. Francis and I had been quite willing and ready to prepare one, but were overruled.

Despite that, I know you're going to love this book and its follow-up, "In the Shadow of the Moon," for which we are currently and meticulously checking through the page proofs before it goes to the printers.

cspg
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posted 03-13-2007 11:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the info. I'm certainly not going to shoot myself because of a missing index! But I'm certainly looking forward to reading your book.

mdmyer
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posted 03-25-2007 07:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I finished reading Into That Silent Sea early Saturday morning. I have read everything ever written by a Mercury, Gemini, or Apollo Program astronaut. I have also read some of the modern "classics" on the history of Man's space exploration such as Andrew Chaikin's A Man on the Moon and Cox and Murray's Apollo: Race to the Moon. I looked forward to reading Into That Silent Sea because I knew this book had been written by people who really enjoy the history of the space program.

French and Burgess are space history enthusiast themselves. Their book tells the stories of the people who lived the space race. It is not a book about dates and missions but it is more of a biographical story about the people who flew the missions, and in one chapter, of the people who did not.

As Colin mentioned in an earlier post when French and Burgess began to write Into That Silent Sea, their goal was to detail the flights from Gagarin's first flight to the voyage of Apollo 11: but their manuscript was so large that the publisher requested that it be reworked in to two different books. Into That Silent Sea is the first of these two books. The authors conducted dozens of interviews with the American astronauts and Russian cosmonauts and the people who knew them the best. I think those personal interviews developed the human side of the space race this book tells. Into That Silent Sea starts with Gagarin's flight and ends with Leonov's first space walk.

I think Chapter 6 (Heavenly Twins) and Chapter 7 ( The Two Wallys ) were my favorites. Chapter 6 detailed the flights of Vostok 3 and Vostok 4. It was the first time one nation had two manned spacecraft in orbit at the same time. Chapter 7 told the stories of Wally Schirra and Wally Funk. While I had read a little about the "Mercury 13" women pilots before, I learned about their hopes and dreams of flying in to space.

I found Into That Silent Sea an easy book to read; I look forward to the rest of the story. I have heard that the publishers of these two books, The University of Nebraska Press, were so pleased with them they decided to create a series of books to tell the story of Man's first steps into space. Into That Silent Sea and In the Shadow of the Moon are the first two books of the series that will be called "Outward Odyssey". In the Shadow of the Moon will pick up where Silent Sea left off.

ColinBurgess
Member

Posts: 1567
From: Sydney, Australia
Registered: Sep 2003

posted 03-26-2007 08:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mike: you make me blush. Thank you on behalf of both of us for those kind words about the book and for your support - I note you have also sent this as a review to Amazon.com

You are a champion.

mdmyer
Member

Posts: 899
From: Humboldt KS USA
Registered: Dec 2003

posted 03-26-2007 10:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The pleasure was mine. I have been purchasing books for years from Amazon.com and I think this is the first time I have ever left a review.

Shows how much I really liked it.

My Thanks go you Francis and you for giving us this book.

FFrench
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Posts: 3093
From: San Diego
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 04-03-2007 11:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
At the Mutual Concerns of Air & Space Museums conference in San Diego, I spotted a familiar face today holding a very familiar book...

When I said hello, he suggested we have a photo taken together with it...

...and then he asked me to sign it for him.

Who would ever have imagined I'd be granting an autograph request FROM Bill Anders?

E2M Lem Man
Member

Posts: 793
From: Los Angeles CA. USA
Registered: Jan 2005

posted 04-05-2007 07:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for E2M Lem Man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"And don't forget about the one in the Command Module!"

Francis and Colin, things have been crazy as of late. I will get one soon. Thanks for calling we an inspiration- you are that to me, guys! I am pleased and proud to call you friends.

Did you exchange autographs with Bill?

Hope to see you both next weekin Downey, eh?

Are you a turtle?

FFrench
Member

Posts: 3093
From: San Diego
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 04-06-2007 09:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
YBYSAIA... wish I could be there for your Downey event, Jim - congratulations on all of your efforts there, and I look forward to visiting in the near future.

eurospace
Member

Posts: 2275
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Dec 2000

posted 04-07-2007 03:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for eurospace   Click Here to Email eurospace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by eurospace:
Can anybody tell them the book is out and how to get it?
I am happy to report that someone must have walked all the way through the Silent Sea (like Moses did) and brought the book to amazon.co.uk . In other words: I picked mine from the parcel box Friday.

Now it's straight into the suitcase for my holiday in May...


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