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Author Topic:   University of Nebraska Outward Odyssey series
ColinBurgess
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posted 08-21-2006 01:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Outward Odyssey
A History of Human Space Exploration

To be published by the University of Nebraska Press

Information release by series editor Colin Burgess, Sydney, Australia

I am pleased to announce the imminent release of the first books in a major undertaking by the University of Nebraska Press, which will detail the social history (human, rather than technical) of space exploration. This series of important books will be released under the series title of Outward Odyssey.

Many of the series' writers, carefully selected over the past three years, are first-time book authors, but all are long-time space enthusiasts, and most are well known to collectSPACE readers.

The first two books, to be titled Into That Silent Sea: Trailblazers of the Space Era 1961-1965 and In the Shadow of the Moon: A Challenging Journey to Tranquility 1965-1969 will be released in the spring and summer of 2007. These two books, which I have co-authored with Francis French, include forewords by Paul Haney and Walt Cunningham respectively. They tell the story of human space flight from Yuri Gagarin to the day that Apollo 11 set down on the moon. Being a social history of that enterprise, they contain the stories of the men and women involved in the Space Race between the United States and what was then the Soviet Union. The personal stories of the cosmonauts and astronauts are told through their words, and those of colleagues and friends who knew them well. What were the motivations and inspirations in their lives that led them to wanting to ride rockets into the silent sea of space?

As this is a progressive series, published over the next few years, not all details are finalized, but here is a brief breakdown of the series.

A book on the Apollo program (including ASTP) is being written, and like other series books contains extensive interviews with the astronauts and other people involved in this magnificent effort.

The Skylab book has been written by David Hitt, together with Skylab astronauts Owen Garriott and Joe Kerwin, and features original contributions from other Skylab astronauts, including an important section based on the personal in-flight diary of Alan Bean. The foreword has already been written by Homer Hickam.

As many will know, another collectSPACE regular, Jay Gallentine, has been working on a book about the history of unmanned satellites and interplanetary probes, and it is a pleasure to finally announce that this book is also a part of the Outward Odyssey series. It will include what has turned out to be the last, extensive interview ever carried out with Dr. James Van Allen. A foreword candidate has yet to be announced.

There will also be two books on the social history of the space shuttle program. The first will discuss the origins and early days of the shuttle program, and will cover the period up to and including the Challenger tragedy. This book will be written by David Hitt, in his second book of the series.

The second shuttle book, which examines the aftermath of the loss of Challenger and her crew, will essentially track the history of the shuttle program through the loss of Columbia and beyond. An author has been selected for this book.

Well-known British space writer Brian Harvey is about to begin writing a book on the history of the Soviet space stations, as well as the ISS. Once again, extensive personal interviews will form the basis of this book, which will look at the human side of these monumental undertakings.

For the tenth and final book in the series, dealing with the ongoing history of private space flight and citizens in space, a suitable author (again a collectSPACE regular) has already been selected. As contracts have yet to be finalized, the author cannot be named at this time.

There will be a large function held to launch the space book series in the summer of 2007, and I will release details once full details of the dates and venue have been determined.

Each of the books is designed to stand alone, but also to be an integral part of the entire space book series.

Further details will be announced as they become known.

johntosullivan
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posted 08-21-2006 03:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for johntosullivan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sounds fantastic! I for one can't wait. These are the topics and themes I want to read about. Well done!

OOTWCook
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posted 08-21-2006 10:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for OOTWCook   Click Here to Email OOTWCook     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sounds like a terrific collection... Keep up the good work.

OLDIE
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posted 08-21-2006 03:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for OLDIE     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I find these personal accounts usually a great deal more interesting than the straightforward historical stories.

It looks like I'm going to have to buy another bookcase!

Dave Clow
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posted 08-23-2006 12:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dave Clow   Click Here to Email Dave Clow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great news!

ColinBurgess
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posted 08-23-2006 03:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have to mention that collectSPACE has already lent considerable and enthusiastic support for this series of books. Without this site, this series would have been far more difficult to put together and accomplish, so I am truly grateful.

My hope is that this series will help inspire a whole new generation of space flight enthusiasts.

MCroft04
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posted 08-23-2006 10:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm excited about these new releases, and can't wait for each one. What a wonderful undertaking, but after having the opportunity to meet you in San Antonio, I am not surprised!

Write it, and we will buy it (and read it). Thanks!

KSCartist
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posted 08-24-2006 06:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Congratulations on this series. I know it will be an interesting read.

Any chance artistic types like Ed Hengeveld, and I might design book covers?

cspg
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posted 09-27-2006 10:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Colin, from the latest NASA History newsletter, it seems you're not the only one to be dealing with this topic - or am I wrong (ok, at least we know what your series will be dealing with!)?
Finally, I am announcing the inauguration of a new line in the NASA History series, SP-4900, Societal Impact of Spaceflight. As many of you know, this is a particular interest of mine, and the History Division has taken up this important subject as part of its portfolio at a time when it is clear that a sustained multigenerational space exploration vision requires society to understand the importance of space exploration and its impact on the daily lives of individuals and on the long-term future of the nation. The first book in this series will be the proceedings of our "Societal Impact of Spaceflight Conference," to be held 19-21 September at the Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, DC.

Subsequent volumes in the series will include a variety of special studies that have been commissioned on the topic. We are still commissioning these studies; if you have an idea, please contact me directly.

ColinBurgess
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posted 09-27-2006 08:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's a good question to ask: in fact I see several crucial differences in looking at these two forthcoming series.

The NASA History Series (which, by the way, sounds terrific) looks like it will examine the impact that space flight had, and will continue to have, on society. By comparison, the Outward Odyssey series is intended as a social history of space flight, relating the human story of this endeavour through the memories and voices of those who were and are most closely involved, and from all nations.

The Outward Odyssey series not only offers profoundly human stories of triumph and tragedy in one of our greatest-ever scientific undertakings, but how it impacted on the lives of those incredible pioneers who built or rode the rockets and spacecraft. While most attention is obviously focused on the space explorers themselves, there are many previously untold stories about those who created these incredible machines.

For instance, as Jay Gallentine has already mentioned in a collectSPACE forum, his is probably the last and most extensive interview ever carried out with the late James Van Allen. Through literally hundreds of personal recollections the readers of this series will learn of the early lives and influences of these people, and how they came to be a part of a mammoth effort to fly into space, to reach the moon, and everything that has subsequently happened in all areas of space exploration.

So while one series looks at the impact space flight has had on society, the other focuses on the people actually involved in that historic undertaking.

It may even be that these two series will complement each other, and that would place even more importance on both.

cspg
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posted 09-28-2006 04:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the clarification. The two series, indeed seem fascinating. I'm looking forward to reading both.

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posted 09-06-2007 12:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for UKRuss2   Click Here to Email UKRuss2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've just purchased the first two books in the Outward Odyssey series. Is there any indication of the release dates of the next two books in the series - the lunar exploration missions and the Skylab project?

ColinBurgess
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posted 09-06-2007 05:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Glad you're enjoying the series, and it seems to be off to a great start judging by the many comments such as yours and the wonderful reviews we've received. For varying reasons there has been a shift in the order of books in the series. Here are the next four to come: Expect some very exciting announcements about future authors in the next few weeks.

FFrench
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posted 10-22-2007 04:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I found an interesting look at the book series at this blog (October 22 posting), and there is also an interesting review of the "In the Shadow of the Moon" movie (October 15).

Jay Gallentine
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posted 10-22-2007 08:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Gallentine   Click Here to Email Jay Gallentine     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great link! A very positive review. Although - egads, he seems to have confused Tod Bryant as the author of 'Ambassadors from Earth'. I'll drop him a line to see if that can be fixed.

Naraht
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posted 10-23-2007 07:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Naraht   Click Here to Email Naraht     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ColinBurgess:
By comparison, the Outward Odyssey series is intended as a social history of space flight, relating the human story of this endeavour through the memories and voices of those who were and are most closely involved, and from all nations.
While I'm sure that the Outward Odyssey series is excellent, you're misusing the term "social history" in comparing the two projects.

The NASA History Series is much more typical of social history, in the way that it aims to uncover long-term societal trends. Your own work sounds much more like a group biography.

ColinBurgess
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posted 10-23-2007 05:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Never argue with someone whose address is Oxford, so they say, and I'm not about to do so.

Of course you are quite right in your assessment, but "social history" is what the academic press publishers (not me) came up with to briefly encapsulate the intent of this series, and I don't really have a problem with that.

Wikipedia's definition of 'social history,' in part, defines it in this way: "Social history is often described as 'history from below' or 'grass roots history' because it deals with the everyday people, the masses and how they shape history rather than the leaders." The Outward Odyssey book series so far follows that general trend, by including the stories of nurses, family members, engineers, pilots, people in mission control, and a wide variety of other voices to tell the stories of these flights. The major aim of these books is to tell the stories of the people who made the flights, and in that respect they are certainly far more biographical (something that interested us far more) than social. But the books follow some general social history trends by keeping the stories fixed on the non-management people and the behind-the-scenes eyewitnesses, rather than concentrating on the decisions of the leaders such as the NASA administrators and presidents.

The books do also touch on some wider social trends, such as the role of women in the space programme (both in the US and Russia), the respect given to aviators versus scientists, and the institutional resistance to astronauts divorcing. But as our aim was always to keep the stories very personal, these wider trends (as you correctly point out) are only examined through the lives of interesting individuals.

Jay Chladek
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posted 10-23-2007 07:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Things do tend to interconnect somewhat from a biographical and social standpoint in works like these. Probably the best example I can think of from recent times is the Ken Burns PBS series "The War" which for the most part featured a biographical account of individuals participating in the interviews and others which they were describing. At the same time, it also revealed the social trends of what went on with Americans during WW2 from their own recollections. If that isn't a social history, I don't know WHAT is.

ColinBurgess
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posted 12-29-2007 07:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Many thanks to all those who have supported the first two books in the Outward Odyssey series ("Into That Silent Sea" and "In the Shadow of the Moon"). 2008 will see the release of the next two series books by the University of Nebraska Press. The first, around April, will be Chris Gainor's excellent "To a Distant Day: The Rocket Pioneers" which chronologically actually precedes the first two books. It tells the story of rocketry and astronautics up to the time of Gagarin, and the people who populate that incredible history. Like every other series book, it is also intended to stand alone as a publication. Chris of course is well known as the author of the widely-read "Arrows to the Moon," and he has done a magnificent job on this, his second book.

For release later in the year is the much-anticipated "Homesteading Space: The Skylab Story." This promises to be a must-have book for anyone interested in spaceflight history; it certainly tells the definitive story of the Skylab program. Beautifully written by collectSPACE regular David Hitt, Owen Garriott and Joe Kerwin (and actually written by these former astronauts - not just lending their names), the book is chock-full of personal stories and information surrounding one of the most fascinating science programs ever undertaken. Every one of the surviving Skylab astronauts has participated in this book to ensure complete accuracy. And as a bonus, the book will feature the contents of a personal diary that Alan Bean kept during his Skylab mission - now published for the very first time. I've read and been involved in the editing process for this book, and it is a winner!

2008 promises to be a particularly exciting year for the Outward Odyssey series, and within a few months I should finally be able to reveal the titles and authors of all eleven books currently being prepared for the series (yes, eleven: another title has now been added!)

As Series Editor for these books, I believe that this is a set of books everyone will want to own and treasure, as it will chronicle in depth the social or human history of the Space Era from its very beginnings right through to the present time. It is scheduled to conclude with the final shuttle mission and the completion of the ISS.

cspg
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posted 12-30-2007 12:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Colin, thanks a lot for the update. I'm really looking forward to the upcoming books. And I fully agree with you regarding "set of books everyone will want to own and treasure" - based on the first one in the series, it's definitely one that stands out and that I will re-re-read in the future. A must have for sure! Now, on to the next one! - well, I'm kind of late in my readings...

johntosullivan
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posted 02-13-2008 04:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for johntosullivan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sorry for the delay in getting to read these great books. I got Silent Sea and Shadow for xmas and I'm half way through Shadow.

Absolutely fantastic. I can't wait to read the upcoming Skylab, Salyut, Shuttle books!

Colin and Francis, how are you planning on dealing with the 200+ Shuttle and Soyuz flights? Not with the same level of detail obviously...

ColinBurgess
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posted 02-13-2008 05:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Marvellous to hear that you are enjoying the books. The latest in the Outward Odyssey series, "To a Distant Day: The Rocket Pioneers" by Chris Gainor is about to be released, and the book to follow in the fall is the Skylab volume by David Hitt, Owen Garriott and Joe Kerwin.

Obviously, once the series moves into the multi-crewed missions the authors will become far more discerning and selective in their narrative, and through necessity not every mission or space explorer from the participating space nations can or will be covered. But the human highlights will feature heavily.

ColinBurgess
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posted 03-12-2008 03:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There has been some strong movement on the series in the past few weeks, and while some contracts are yet to be finalised and awarded, I can reveal the final eight (working) titles in the Outward Odyssey series. Where contracts have been awarded I can now reveal the names of the authors, but in the case of those still pending I can only give the title. This has been quite a mammoth undertaking (it's certainly kept me busy these past five years), and the publishers are understandably examining ongoing sales and other indicators before fully committing themselves to giving the green light for all twelve volumes.

So here is the full list of all twelve (main) titles:

Now published:

  • Into That Silent Sea - Francis French and Colin Burgess

  • In the Shadow of the Moon - Francis French and Colin Burgess

  • To a Distant Day - Chris Gainor
Future publications:
  • Homesteading Space - David Hitt, Owen Garriott and Joe Kerwin

  • Amabassadors From Earth (Satellites and Plaetary Probes) - Jay Gallentine

  • Footprints in the Dust (Apollo)

  • Bold They Rise (First space shuttle era)

  • Realizing Tomorrow (Private and Commercial Space Flight) - Chris Dubbs, Eric Dahlstrom and Emeline Paat-Dahlstrom

  • Stations in the Sky (A History of Space Stations) - Jay Chladek

  • X-15: Wings Into Space

  • Pilgrims of the Universe (Continuing the planetary probes story)

  • Dawn's Early Light (Ending the shuttle era)
Negotiations continue, as each book (and author) has to be considered on individual merits and given final approval, and this has not yet been fully implemented in some instances. However authors have been assigned to all twelve books, and work goes on with all of them. Hopefully some more authors can be named to their specific books sometime soon.

MCroft04
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posted 03-12-2008 07:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You just made my day. If the remaining books are even close to the quality of the first three in the series, you can consider it a complete success!

Great to have these titles to look forward to!

ColinBurgess
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posted 03-13-2008 04:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the kind words - hope we get to meet up again sometime. It was a big undertaking for me back in late 2003 to commit around eight years of my life to this series, but I have to tell you I am so incredibly proud of the authors that I've signed up for this series. Most of them are first-time book authors, and of course many of them came to me through collectSPACE. I hope that giving them this opportunity and kick-start into book-writing will spur them on to putting together a whole new raft of books on spaceflight topics.

Overall, apart from a few hiccups, this has been an incredibly rewarding and exciting experience, both for me and the authors.

Jay Chladek
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posted 03-21-2008 12:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, there was one minor hurdle to clear and by next week, I'll be fully in the fold and working hard on my book. I can't say much until then and not even much at that point as I'll want you to buy the book when it comes out.

But I will say that with Colin in charge of this series, Outward Odyssey couldn't be in better hands.

I will be able to announce what my (hopefully) better working title will be and what I intend to cover. With Colin and French (and Gainor) writing some really good books already, I have a high bar of quality I need to maintain.

ColinBurgess
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posted 04-06-2008 12:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"Outward Odyssey" now has its own website, courtesy of the the University of Nebraska Press.

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posted 01-14-2009 08:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AndrewLiptak   Click Here to Email AndrewLiptak     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Colin, I'm greatly enjoying the series thus far, and am looking forward to the next installment. Is there going to be any book about the impact that spaceflight had on society, not just in the scientific community, but the arts and culture portion as well?

ColinBurgess
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posted 01-15-2009 02:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's a difficult question to answer as each book has a different author who, apart from being given basic guidelines on what their book should contain, is pretty-much able to write their story in the way they feel best fits the outline they have in mind. Having read and edited most of the manuscript material that will appear in the Apollo book "Footprints in the Dust," I know that the issue of social problems, disharmony and war around that time is raised and discussed by a couple of the book's authors, but beyond this I don't feel I can adequately respond to your question. But thank you for your kind words on the series so far - it's certainly kept me busy these past five years (with probably another four years to come).

ejectr
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posted 01-30-2009 08:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Could you give a list of books published in the series so far please?

ColinBurgess
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posted 01-30-2009 08:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Certainly: Books under contract (in current order of publishing schedule): I expect the eleventh book - the second planetary exploration book - to be placed under contract within weeks. The twelth book is on indefinite hold until the publishers and I (and the potential author) know for certain what is going to happen to the shuttle schedule, and whether its lifespan will be expanded beyond 2010.

GoesTo11
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posted 11-17-2009 11:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GoesTo11   Click Here to Email GoesTo11     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Colin, not that it's a huge deal, but can we assume that the cover art for the paperback "Outward Odyssey" editions will be the same as that of the hardcover jackets, with perhaps some new review blurbs and promo copy added? Or will the covers be significantly different? Thanks!

minipci
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posted 11-17-2009 12:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for minipci     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As I understand it "Stations in the Sky" by Jay Chladek is intended to have some coverage of ASTP within it.

Was any consideration given to having a more complete coverage by having a book just on ASTP for the Outward Odyssey series?

ColinBurgess
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posted 11-17-2009 04:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In regard to the paperback covers, the answer is yes - the covers are very similar to those on the hardcover dustjackets. The back-cover blurbs have now been placed on the inside back pages of the paperback, with unsolicited reviews (subsequent to the hardcover release) now taking their place.

As for ASTP, it was felt that it did not merit a book of its own, but it has full coverage in the soon-to-be-released series book "Footprints in the Dust: The Epic Journeys of Apollo, 1969-1975," with lots of background information and stories gained by the author Geoffrey Bowman during interviews with the participating astronauts and cosmonauts. I think you'll like it a lot.

MCroft04
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posted 11-17-2009 08:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just completed reading "Ambassadors From Earth" and placed it on my bookshelf along side its brothers and sisters. And boy does it look great having five of those books all lined up. And more to come! A very positive review will be placed on Amazon tomorrow.

Jay, thanks for a wonderful book!

By the way, I saw hard copies of "Into That Silent Sea" on sale at Borders the other day in Frederick, Maryland.

ColinBurgess
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posted 11-17-2009 11:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mel, many thanks for the great feedback.

Jay Chladek
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posted 11-18-2009 11:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And yes, my own project will have a chapter covering ASTP as well. I felt given that the later space lab and station programs were cooperative efforts between the US and other countries, and given that ASTP did fly some experiments in the docking module, it is a space laboratory of sorts. It fits into the tapestry of the story as to how things got from where they were to where they are today.

Indeed there have already been many books written about ASTP, either in full or in part. Leonov, Stafford and Slayton all gave coverage in their respective biographies. NASA also published an extensive ASTP report as well which covers the subject from the early concepts to post flight. I managed to find a copy at a Half Price books near JSC (somebody cleared out their closet), but it did cost a pretty penny (it was worth it though).

canyon42
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posted 11-29-2009 11:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have a request/suggestion. While reading the first few books in this excellent series, I remember thinking that the one major drawback to them was the lack of an index. This seemed to me a fairly significant omission for such scholarly works, particularly since each volume has such a large number of people and names to keep track of. The latest title, of course, has an index, and I know I read in one of these threads that the earlier volumes will be updated with indexes of their own in later editions.

My question is whether it is possible to make the index for each of the earlier books available in electronic form somehow, either through an online posting or via e-mail by request, for those of us who have already purchased the first editions. I know I for one would very much appreciate having a copy of each index that I could print out and keep with the individual books.

Thanks again for a great series--looking forward to the remaining volumes.

ChrisCalle
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Posts: 84
From: Ridgefield, CT USA
Registered: Jan 2009

posted 11-29-2009 08:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ChrisCalle   Click Here to Email ChrisCalle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Jay, if you would like to use any of the sketches my father did during the Apollo Soyuz training in the Soviet Union just let me know. Here is a link to the images on my website.

ColinBurgess
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Posts: 1584
From: Sydney, Australia
Registered: Sep 2003

posted 11-30-2009 12:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In regard to the indexes for those first couple of hardcover books I'll check with UNP and see what they say. They admit the original decision to exclude an index was an error in judgment, and it has now been rectified in the softcover versions.

They'll be back at work in the morning - I'll see if I can get an answer for you.


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