Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Space Places
  Smithsonian Udvar-Hazy Center: shuttle Discovery (Page 1)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 3 pages long:   1  2  3 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Smithsonian Udvar-Hazy Center: shuttle Discovery
Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-12-2011 07:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Editor's note: This topic is intended for updates and discussion about space shuttle Discovery's display at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia.

For general discussion about exhibiting NASA's retired space shuttles or about other venues, please see the appropriate other topics.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-12-2011 07:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
National Air and Space Museum release
Space Shuttle Discovery Joins the National Collection

Discovery, the longest-serving orbiter in the space shuttle fleet, will be accepted into the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum collection. The space shuttle has been the icon for American spaceflight for a generation, and Discovery has flown every type of mission during its 27-year career.

After a period of preparation and delivery, the orbiter will be placed on display in the James S. McDonnell Space Hangar of the museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. Occupying a central position in the space hangar and surrounded by scores of other major artifacts, Discovery will represent the drive to establish routine space transportation and to enable people to live and work in space for scientific and practical benefits. Space shuttle Enterprise, currently on display in the same location, has been showcased at the Udvar-Hazy Center since the center opened in 2003. Enterprise has been seen by almost 9 million visitors to the museum and it will continue to inspire and educate the public at its new home.

The decision to transfer Discovery to the National Air and Space Museum was announced by NASA April 12, the 30th anniversary of the space shuttle program. The museum's collection contains hundreds of NASA artifacts, including spacecraft and spacesuits from the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo and Skylab programs and the shuttle era.

"NASA and the Smithsonian signed an agreement in 1967 that has enabled the National Air and Space Museum to preserve and display the greatest icons of our nation's space history," said Gen. J.R. "Jack" Dailey, director of the museum. "Honored for four decades, this agreement has served NASA, the Smithsonian and the public very well. The space collection enables us to explore major scientific achievements and share an inspiring aspect of the American experience."

With the acquisition of Discovery, the museum adds to its holdings of aviation and space "firsts."

"Fully a third of the museum's collection of aircraft are one-of-a-kind examples or associated with milestone achievements," said Valerie Neal, space shuttle program curator in the museum's Division of Space History. "Discovery will join the ranks of treasures such as the 1903 Wright Flyer, the Spirit of St. Louis, the Mercury Friendship 7 capsule and the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia. Discovery represents innovation, ingenuity and the effort to make spaceflight a regular activity in the life of the nation."

Discovery flew 39 missions, including satellite deliveries, Defense Department projects and trips to the Hubble Space Telescope and the Russian space station Mir. It retired after having spent a total of 365 days in space and flown 13 times to the International Space Station, including the 100th shuttle mission in 2000.

Discovery is associated with several historic achievements. The first African American commander, Frederick Gregory, flew the craft in 1989. In 1995, the orbiter was flown by the first female pilot of a spacecraft, Eileen Collins, who later commanded a 2005 Discovery mission. In 1998 Sen. John Glenn, at age 77, flew on the spacecraft in a return to space, having made history in 1962 as the first American to orbit the Earth in Friendship 7. Following the Challenger and Columbia tragedies, Discovery was chosen to return to spaceflight.

The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center contains two exhibition spaces, the Boeing Aviation Hangar and the James S. McDonnell Space Hangar. There are 161 large aircraft and 160 large spacecraft on view along with hundreds of small artifacts. With more than a million visitors a year, the center is among the world's most popular aviation and space museums, second only to the flagship building on the National Mall.

The National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., is located at Sixth Street and Independence Avenue S.W. The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center is located in Chantilly, Va., near Washington Dulles International Airport. Both facilities are open daily from 10 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. (closed Dec. 25). Admission is free, but there is a $15 fee for parking at the Udvar-Hazy Center.

gleopold
Member

Posts: 30
From: Reston, VA, USA
Registered: Jun 2010

posted 04-13-2011 12:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for gleopold   Click Here to Email gleopold     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Saw it fly over my house in N. Virginia along with ISS last month. Looking forward to seeing it up close.

Glint
Member

Posts: 796
From: New Windsor, Maryland USA
Registered: Jan 2004

posted 04-13-2011 01:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In 1984 I watched, from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Discovery launching on its maiden voyage. And then last month observed it passing over the east coast on its last [North American] evening in space, flying in formation with the ISS.

Am looking forward to seeing it up close many times in the future at Udvar-Hazy!

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 994
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 04-13-2011 08:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has a target date been released for when Discovery will go on display?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-13-2011 09:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA has said that it is targeting having Discovery ready by January 2012, so sometime after that (presumably the Smithsonian will need to coordinate schedules with the Intrepid so that Enterprise has somewhere to go when Discovery arrives).

stsmithva
Member

Posts: 1452
From: Fairfax, VA, USA
Registered: Feb 2007

posted 04-13-2011 09:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for stsmithva   Click Here to Email stsmithva     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Any suggestions for to whom I (and perhaps other DC-area members) could write a letter suggesting that when the 747 carrying Discovery arrives in the DC area, they do a fly-by around the Beltway? Such a thing was done about 25 years ago (discussed on some other thread) and hundreds of thousands of people would find it quite a sight to behold.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-13-2011 09:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't believe you'll need a letter writing campaign to see that happen.

NASA said Tuesday it is looking into using the delivery of the space shuttles to their new homes to tour the orbiters through other cities across the nation. With that under consideration, it would seem a given that they would also do a flyaround of the recipient cities.

kr4mula
Member

Posts: 615
From: Cinci, OH
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 04-14-2011 10:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
NASA said Tuesday it is looking into using the delivery of the space shuttles to their new homes to tour the orbiters through other cities across the nation.
Hopefully they'll use that as an occasion to show the orbiters to all of the states in the middle of the country and not adhere to the "flyover states" philosophy.

BobbyA
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 04-14-2011 11:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for BobbyA   Click Here to Email BobbyA     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Are there plans to change the display at all when Discovery replaces Enterprise?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-20-2011 09:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
National Air and Space Museum curator Valerie Neal discusses bringing Discovery to the Udvar-Hazy Center during this interview with Federal News Radio.

drjeffbang
Member

Posts: 109
From: Virginia
Registered: Nov 2009

posted 04-20-2011 02:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for drjeffbang   Click Here to Email drjeffbang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We met Valerie Neal at UH last year. She was great with all the kids.

I'm glad to hear we'll see Discovery in its last flown condition.

Any ideas when the transition of Enterprise and Discovery will occur?

Cliff Lentz
Member

Posts: 649
From: Philadelphia, PA USA
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 04-23-2011 11:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cliff Lentz   Click Here to Email Cliff Lentz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Was curious if the NASM submitted a plan about how they were going to display Discovery. The Enterprise display really wasn't anything more than just parking it in the hangar and adding a few space displays around it. There wasn't a strictly Space Shuttle theme. There was very little information about the program there. It was just a hangar were they dumped all the space stuff!
The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center contains two exhibition spaces, the Boeing Aviation Hangar and the James S. McDonnell Space Hangar. There are 161 large aircraft and 160 large spacecraft on view along with hundreds of small artifacts.
I've been to the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center three times and I'm trying to figure out where there are 160 large spacecraft hidden. I'm sure there are 161 aircraft since it is a great facility, I just didn't see that many spacecrafts!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-24-2011 11:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As curator Valerie Neal describes in the earlier linked Federal News Radio interview, Discovery will be displayed exactly as Enterprise is now, taking center stage in the Udvar-Hazy's McDonnell Space Hangar.

The museum is receiving additional orbiter artifacts, which they plan to display around Discovery to better tell the story of the space shuttle but the National Air and Space Museum's primary shuttle-devoted gallery is "Moving Beyond Earth" located on the first floor of the National Mall building.

quote:
Originally posted by Cliff Lentz:
It was just a hangar were they dumped all the space stuff!
I personally wouldn't choose the word "dumped" to describe the McDonnell hangar's displays. While there may not be separate galleries, there are themes to how the artifacts are arranged.

Cliff Lentz
Member

Posts: 649
From: Philadelphia, PA USA
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 05-01-2011 11:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cliff Lentz   Click Here to Email Cliff Lentz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I guess I've become quite protective of the orbiters. I defend them every chance I get. There is this perception that they are outdated and falling apart. I dispute this and I think they could fly for another 30 years in the current states they are in. The only reason they are being retired is POLITICS! To hear comments that they are "Weather Beaten" is disrespectful to the shuttle workers who have cared for them and the men and women who fly them.

My problem with Udvar-Hazy is the design of the exhibits. It looks like a warehouse! There really isn't clear signage or the video presentations that you get at the Mall facility. I sat in the Space Wing for several hours and watched the visitors walk through very quickly spending only a few seconds at the exhibits. They did spend considerably more time in the aircraft wings. Not being one to shy away from sharing what info I have with others, I asked some of the visitors about the Gemini 7 spacecraft. It seemed that most didn't know it was real and all of them didn't know anything about GT-7! Either they were waiting to hear about it on a tour or they just didn't notice the signage. I hope that Discovery is treated better. It is the most flown vehicle to date and should be treated as such!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-01-2011 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Cliff Lentz:
To hear comments that they are "Weather Beaten" is disrespectful to the shuttle workers who have cared for them and the men and women who fly them.
I think that might be a tad overly protective; I've heard both shuttle techs and astronauts describe the orbiters as weather beaten and worse... and they weren't being derisive.
quote:
My problem with Udvar-Hazy is the design of the exhibits. It looks like a warehouse!
To each their own I guess, but I found the layout of the McDonnell Hangar to be attractive, if not somewhat more impressive than some of the older galleries on the National Mall.

Cliff Lentz
Member

Posts: 649
From: Philadelphia, PA USA
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 05-01-2011 12:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cliff Lentz   Click Here to Email Cliff Lentz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
I think that might be a tad overly protective...
That's certainly possible. I just can't get out of my head how unique the orbiters are. I've had 30 years defending them. Last week on my radio report I was asked if we would be able to sit in the commander's seat in the display? When I said definitely not everybody seemed to say "Then what's the point!" I don't think we need to go that far, but I just believe there needs to be a better setup.

Tykeanaut
Member

Posts: 1812
From: Worcestershire, England, UK.
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 07-21-2011 11:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by drjeffbang:
Any ideas when the transition of Enterprise and Discovery will occur?
I believe space shuttle Discovery is being moved there on April 12, 2012. Any idea when it will be available for public viewing?

MarylandSpace
Member

Posts: 1030
From:
Registered: Aug 2002

posted 07-21-2011 11:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MarylandSpace   Click Here to Email MarylandSpace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am hoping that NASA does a piggyback flyover around the Washington Beltway with Discovery before a final landing at Dulles/Udvar-Hazy.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-21-2011 11:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tykeanaut:
I believe space shuttle Discovery is being moved there on April 12, 2012. Any idea when it will be available for public viewing?
April 12 is the target date, but has not been finalized as of yet.

According to the Smithsonian, Discovery will be viewable/accessible by the public soon after its arrival.

MrSpace86
Member

Posts: 1399
From: Gardner, KS, USA
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 08-06-2011 11:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MrSpace86   Click Here to Email MrSpace86     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is it confirmed that the flight and mid deck of Discovery (and the other orbiters) will be left intact? If so, what would be the point of doing so if no one will ever be allowed inside?

I am unsure if other aircraft at the NASM have been "gutted" (such as the Concorde or the Enola Gay) but it seems that Enterprise is missing most of those components and no one really minds. I don't think any of use will ever get to be inside any of the mentioned vehicles so wouldn't be better in terms of weight and cost to get rid of all that?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-06-2011 11:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A couple of points:
  1. Each of the orbiter recipients have the option of asking for components from the flight- and mid-decks to be removed.

    The example offered by NASA was that a museum might choose to have the galley or waste containment system (toilet) removed, so they could display them separately.

  2. Museums serve more than one purpose. They cater to visitors who want to view historic vehicles but they are also an archive for future generations.

    The Smithsonian, in particular, has an interest in maintaining engineering examples for future historians and engineers to study and learn from. If a future spacecraft can be better designed because researchers have access to a well-preserved orbiter, than that more than justifies "depriving" the public a chance at seeing firsthand a cockpit that they can just as easily see in a mockup or simulator.

APG85
Member

Posts: 254
From:
Registered: Jan 2008

posted 08-06-2011 11:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for APG85     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Enola Gay is virtually complete inside. The NASM drives toward completeness on all of their aircraft and spacecraft...

MrSpace86
Member

Posts: 1399
From: Gardner, KS, USA
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 08-06-2011 11:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MrSpace86   Click Here to Email MrSpace86     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just hope they devise some sort of way to be able to peak into the flight deck or mid-deck. The Enola Gay is angled in such a way that you can see through the cockpit windows. Some sort of binoculars placed at a particular height and angle somewhere in the museum (like the ones they have in big cities to look at buildings and such) would nice to have in the NASM to get an "up close" look at Discovery's flight deck. Have the hatch open and place plexiglass so no one jumps and climbs in and you have the mid-deck visible.

Nice to dream! Or... is there a place where NASM takes suggestions?

APG85
Member

Posts: 254
From:
Registered: Jan 2008

posted 08-06-2011 11:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for APG85     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would be surprised if the NASM removes anything from Discovery for exterior display as this is against their basic charter. Typically, they will photograph the interiors and put those pics on their website...

glcanon
Member

Posts: 12
From: Houston
Registered: Mar 2011

posted 08-07-2011 03:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for glcanon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If you want to do a walk-through of a shuttle, you'll have to visit Space Center Houston, where they already have a full-scale mockup of section forward of the payload bay. You actually get to walk through the cockpit area and it is fully instrumented like the early shuttles were, ie, no glass cockpit, but the three original CRTs and all the analog gauges. I don't think they will do this to any of the existing shuttles as such would be sacrilege.

glcanon
Member

Posts: 12
From: Houston
Registered: Mar 2011

posted 08-07-2011 03:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for glcanon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In order to utilize the shuttle SSMEs for future flights and testing, NASA will provide the museums with "inoperable nozzle assets" and an adapter to simulate the SSME for display purposes. This basically means a used nozzle, but all the plumbing and turbopumps will be removed, not that you would have been able to see them anyway since the plumbing was inside the aft bay. If you want to see a complete SSME assembly up close, you can visit KSC, Huntsville Space Camp, or Space Center Houston.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-07-2011 03:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by glcanon:
If you want to do a walk-through of a shuttle...
There are multiple museums with mockup shuttle crew compartments and flight decks on display, like Space Center Houston.

To the subject of this thread, the National Air and Space Museum plans to use one of the two original crew compartment trainers to provide this experience.

...a crew compartment trainer from the Johnson Space Center — a highly realistic version of the shuttle flight deck and middeck from the orbiter's nose to the payload bay. The crew compartment trainer should enable the Museum to offer a shuttle walk-through experience similar to our Skylab and Boeing 747 displays.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-07-2011 04:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by glcanon:
This basically means a used nozzle, but all the plumbing and turbopumps will be removed
According to NASA, the SSME display units to be installed on the orbiters (including Discovery) will include their turbopump assemblies using components from retired Block I engines. They won't be complete such that they could be fired, but all their major components will be included.

The Smithsonian has also specifically requested NASA preserve as much of the internal plumping in Discovery as is safely possible for future engineering study.

The National Air and Space Museum exhibits a complete space shuttle main engine at the Udvar-Hazy Center.

This SSME is made of up of components of SSMEs that have flown into space. The flights have included the first four Shuttle missions, the second Hubble Space Telescope repair mission, the missions that launched the Magellan and Galileo space probes, and the John Glenn flight. The engine was donated by Rocketdyne to the Smithsonian in 2004.

GACspaceguy
Member

Posts: 1526
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 08-27-2011 11:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just finished reading the NASA Office of Inspector General's review of NASA's selection of display locations for the space shuttle orbiters. In the document starting on page 24 it give some insight as to how the orbiters will be displayed.

I thought I would post excerpts from that report here for those who would not have read the report or made it to the final few pages.

NASA selected the Smithsonian to receive Discovery.

NASA began after-mission processing and "safing" preparation activities on Discovery in March 2011 after the vehicle returned from its final mission. NASA plans to complete the processing activities required for display by January 2012 and store Discovery in the Vehicle Assembly Building or Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center until April 2012, when it will be ferried on the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft to Dulles International Airport and transported to the nearby Udvar-Hazy Center for display.

Discovery will replace Enterprise, which will then be moved to the Intrepid.

The Smithsonian's logistics plan was submitted to NASA in June 2011, and its exhibit plan is due in August. Title transfer is planned for February 2012, but because NASA is funding all of Discovery's display preparation and ferrying costs, a finance plan was not required.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-30-2011 09:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The new tentative ferry date for shuttle Discovery to the Udvar-Hazy Center is April 16, 2012. (source: Florida Today)

Hart Sastrowardoyo
Member

Posts: 2385
From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 11-30-2011 10:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Which will be moved first: Discovery or Enterprise? Or will both orbiters be moved simultaneously? (That would be neat, two SCAs, both carrying shuttles, in the air at the same time.)

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-30-2011 11:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Discovery will arrive first, be unloaded from the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, and then Enterprise will be hoisted onto the 747 and depart for New York within several days.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-24-2012 08:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
National Air and Space Museum announcement
Welcome, Discovery!

Discovery is expected to land at Washington Dulles International Airport on April 17 and transfer to the Udvar-Hazy Center on April 19. Join us to launch Space Shuttle Discovery on its new mission to educate and inspire!

Activities related to the arrival of Discovery — including a fly-over — have not been finalized at this time. Information on arrival activities, including public events and opportunities, will be released at a later date.

Discovery, the champion of the space shuttle fleet, associated with major historic, scientific and technological achievements, will be the first of the flown space shuttles to go on display.

Exact details will become available in the next few weeks. Check back here for updates.

You can also subscribe to the Museum's e-newsletter, What's Up, fan our Facebook page, or follow @airandspace on Twitter for the latest news.

Please note that arrival activities are weather contingent and will be rescheduled in the event of inclement conditions.

For those participating from a distance, many of the activities will be available for viewing on TV or the web. Details coming soon.

ilbasso
Member

Posts: 1501
From: Greensboro, NC USA
Registered: Feb 2006

posted 01-28-2012 09:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A friend who works at Udvar-Hazy (in a non-technical role) had this interesting piece of scuttlebutt. Take it for what it's worth:
The museum curators are already going nuts, since a lot of other stuff (satellites hanging from the ceiling, missiles lined up behind the Enterprise etc.) has to be moved out of the way; plus it turns out that the giant 'garage door' right behind the shuttle was finished AFTER Enterprise was parked inside: either the shuttles will both have to have their tails removed to get through (the engineers' choice) or a big chunk of the wall will be removed (the curators' choice --- and it looks like they've won the discussion!)
Editor's note: Just to put any concerns or rumors to rest, here's the real story as relayed directly from Enterprise's curator, Valerie Neal.
The back wall of the space hangar at the Udvar-Hazy Center was specifically designed with a removable center panel over the hangar door to admit passage of a space shuttle orbiter. The hangar and door were built before Enterprise was moved into the building, and Enterprise moved very cleanly through the opening upon its installation.

Artifacts displayed behind Enterprise were moved to open a path as wide as the orbiter’s wingspan. No hanging artifacts were removed and no curators or collections managers went nuts in the process. It was all an orderly procedure and all in a day's (actually multiple days') work. All will be restored in an orderly fashion after Discovery enters the hangar.

There was no consideration whatsoever of removing either orbiter’s vertical stabilizer, nor were any engineers consulted about that possibility.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-28-2012 09:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For reference, our photos from Nov. 2003 show how Enterprise was rolled into the Udvar-Hazy Center's McDonnell Space Hangar.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-28-2012 04:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
Smithsonian sets space shuttle arrival to 'Welcome Discovery' to DC

NASA's space shuttle Discovery is set to land in Washington, DC this April, where the now retired fleet leader — the world's most flown spacecraft — will be welcomed by the Smithsonian Institution during a four-day public festival, museum officials said on Tuesday (Feb. 28).

"When NASA transfers Discovery to the National Air and Space Museum, the American people will gain a major icon of space history and an educational treasure to be valued now and for years to come," museum director Gen. J.R. "Jack" Dailey said in a press statement. "We invite the public to help us welcome Discovery to the collection of the Smithsonian Institution."

Also see: National Air and Space Museum's Welcome Space Shuttle Discovery!

NavySpaceFan
Member

Posts: 638
From: Norfolk, VA
Registered: May 2007

posted 02-29-2012 01:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'll be there for a book signing from 12-5 PM on the 19th. Hope to see you there!!!!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-29-2012 03:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Smithsonian has begun distributing a poster to area businesses and attractions promoting Discovery's arrival and the "Welcome Discovery" festival. Click on the image below to download and print your own...

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 29191
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-09-2012 08:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
National Air and Space Museum release
Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum and NASA Will Invite 30 of Their Social Media Followers to Welcome Space Shuttle Discovery

The National Air and Space Museum and NASA will invite 30 of their social media followers to the first "NASA Social" April 19 to welcome space shuttle Discovery to the National Collection.

Registration opens at noon EDT Thursday, March 15, and closes at noon EDT Friday, March 16. Thirty (30) participants will be randomly selected from online registrations.

A "NASA Social" is an event for people who use one of NASA's social media accounts. Each participant may invite one guest and all registrants must be 13 or older.

The social media group will tour the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center; speak with museum curators, NASA scientists and engineers; and will have the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity of viewing and photographing space shuttles Enterprise and Discovery together.

Participants will also meet fellow space enthusiasts who are active on social media and members of the Smithsonian's and NASA's social media teams.

Discovery will be officially transferred by NASA into the Smithsonian's collection April 19 in an outdoor ceremony open to the public. The event will begin with Discovery's arrival from adjacent Dulles Airport onto the tow road behind the center.

That evening specialists from NASA and the Museum's Collections Division will begin repositioning Enterprise and Discovery, the latter to be moved inside the Center's James S. McDonnell Space Hangar.


This topic is 3 pages long:   1  2  3 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2014 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement