Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Space Places
  National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   National Museum of the U.S. Air Force
Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-23-2007 03:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
On another forum as part of an on-going discussion about orbiter retirement, one of their members posted:
Recently, the National Museum of the United States Air Force put a model of their newest hangar (to be constructed next year) on display. Space Shuttle Discovery is shown as one of the displays within this hangar...
The model referred to can be seen here, courtesy the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force:

According to museum spokesperson Sarah Parke, the model of Discovery is a placeholder and does not confirm that they will receive that specific orbiter or, for that matter, any orbiter.

"We have requested a shuttle, but there have been no decisions on where the shuttles will go once they are retired," Parke told collectSPACE.

For more about the orbiters' post-retirement plans, see: Retired shuttles on display

Ben
Member

Posts: 1843
From: Daytona Beach, FL
Registered: May 2000

posted 03-23-2007 04:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is that a Titan IV there? I'd like to know whether that's one of the remaining unflown ones (the core, at least).

Edit: Yep, Titan IV B-37:

B-37 Unassigned

B-37 Titan core to be transferred to the U.S. Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio.

mikej
Member

Posts: 374
From: Germantown, WI USA
Registered: Jan 2004

posted 03-23-2007 04:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mikej   Click Here to Email mikej     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ben:
Is that a Titan IV there? I'd like to know whether that's one of the remaining unflown ones (the core, at least).
I visited the Air Force Museum a short time after their Missile Silo opened; at the time, only 4 missiles were on display.

I inquired of a volunteer when other missiles (such as their Atlas) would be on display. As part of his answer, he said that they'd just received a Titan IV, but that it was too large to display in the Missile Silo, so they didn't know how or where they would be able to display it.

Looks like they solved that problem.

Jurg Bolli
Member

Posts: 520
From: Albuquerque, NM
Registered: Nov 2000

posted 03-26-2007 07:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jurg Bolli   Click Here to Email Jurg Bolli     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The museum is a great place, the Apollo 15 CM is there along with X-15A-2, and many nice planes. And an extra hangar would certainly be good.

apollo11lem5
Member

Posts: 528
From: Seminole, Florida, United States
Registered: May 2000

posted 03-27-2007 07:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for apollo11lem5   Click Here to Email apollo11lem5     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I hope the museum does get a shuttle as it is a great museum! Discovery would seem to be appropriate since I THINK it was designated to be the USAF military shuttle and was supposed to fly polar orbits from SLC-6 (Southern Launch Complex 6) at Vandenberg AFB in California. When SLC-6 was scrapped the USAF shuttle was canceled as well. Does anyone know if Discovery was intended to be The USAF shuttle? Best To All....Don

KSCartist
Member

Posts: 2488
From: Titusville, FL USA
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 03-27-2007 11:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Don't know if Discovery would have been assigned as the Vandenburg vehicle permanently, but it was slated to fly on STS-62A.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
Member

Posts: 2123
From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 03-27-2007 11:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A mid-1984 Rockwell Shuttle document I've seen does list Discovery as the orbiter being used for all the Vandenberg flights. (Off hand, I don't remember how many of those flights were forecasted between then and 1989, but a good guess would be they were planning STS-12V - that's 12 Vandenberg flights in three years between 1986 and 1989, while the remaining three orbiters were flying up to STS-101! I have the book at home and can look it up more exactly, if anyone's interested.)

Danno
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 03-27-2007 04:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Danno   Click Here to Email Danno     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Atlantis flew a few DoD missions. STS-36 flew at a 62 degree inclination which is probably about the closest a shuttle ever got to a polar orbit.

hartspace
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 03-27-2007 09:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for hartspace   Click Here to Email hartspace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Discovery was scheduled to be permanently assigned to VAFB starting with the 62-A mission. It wasn't, however, the "USAF" shuttle. The orbiter would have still had its NASA markings, with flight crews assigned by NASA and the missions controlled by JSC. The only time Discovery was actually at VAFB was a brief visit on the back of the NASA 747. Enterprise did go through the entire processing flow, including being stacked on the SLC-6 launch pad.

Lou Chinal
Member

Posts: 946
From: Staten Island, NY
Registered: Jun 2007

posted 01-23-2009 07:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lou Chinal   Click Here to Email Lou Chinal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Does anyone know of anybody who works at the Air Force Museum? Someone who really knows the exhibits. You can email me, thanks.

APG85
Member

Posts: 241
From:
Registered: Jan 2008

posted 01-24-2009 04:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for APG85     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Check out the Warbird Information Exchange website. There are people on this forum (who post routinely) that work at the Museum...

RMH
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 01-24-2009 10:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for RMH   Click Here to Email RMH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The museum's website has an informative individual write up of all the exhibits.

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 09-02-2009 11:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We are considering driving down to Dayton this weekend to see the U.S Air Force Museum. Can anyone recommend good hotels close to the museum?

kr4mula
Member

Posts: 599
From: Cinci, OH
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 09-02-2009 01:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There is a very new Comfort Suites directly across the street from the entrance to the Air Force Museum. I've never been there, but it looks nice. It replaced a couple of very seedy motels that were razed a few years ago. The only problem is that the hotel is basically out there by itself. The other option is to stay nearby in the much more populated area along Colonel Glenn Highway, which runs along the opposite side of the base from the museum entrance. There are many hotels (Holiday Inn, Ramada, etc., all of which are nice) and fast food/chain restaurants in that area, as well as an indoor shopping mall, typical of a suburban/college area. It's about a 5-10 minute drive (surface streets) from there to the museum, mainly becase you have to circumnavigate the base. So you either can stay in a hotel around there where you're very close to other things and have a short drive to the museum, or be very close to the museum and have a short drive anywhere else. Put the museum in google maps and you will find all the hotels and such.

Let me know if I can help in any other way. It looks to be a beautiful weekend here in southwest Ohio.

P.S. Be sure to take the shuttle bus up to the R&D/Presidential hangar to see the Lifting bodies, X-15, etc.

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 09-02-2009 01:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I saw the Comfort Inn and it looks okay, but I am bringing the Mrs. and six year old so I am sure they will want to stay near shopping while I visit the museum.

It is my first visit there so I am really looking foreword to it. It is a bit drive but worth it I think.

GACspaceguy
Member

Posts: 1394
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 09-02-2009 03:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My wife and I have traveled many times from here in Georgia to my home town of London Ontario, Canada. When we do, there is two places we stop along I-75 on the way there one is the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton and the Armstrong Air and Space Museum is a museum in Wapakoneta, Ohio. We typically stay at the Drury Inn in Dayton (exit 59 on I-75) as it is centrally located and there are a number of restaurants on the same street.

You will most likely be going there by travelling west on the 401 and then south on I-75 so you will pass right by the Armstrong Air and Space Museum which you can see from the highway it's that close from exit 111. It will only take 30 minutes to an hour to see it and it makes a good rest stop.

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 09-03-2009 08:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I will try and talk my wife into stopping at the Armstrong Museum. She's pretty good about these things so she will likely go with it.

kr4mula
Member

Posts: 599
From: Cinci, OH
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 09-03-2009 11:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'd second a stop at the Armstrong Museum on your way down. It's relatively small, but has some great stuff. It's about an hour or so outside of Dayton, so it's a good pit stop if you need it.

Two things to keep in mind on your way down: it's Labor Day weekend, so traffic will be heavier than usual (possibly much more so), as will the police presence on the highways.

Also, I-75 north of Dayton (starting with the I-70 interchange through downtown) is under major reconstruction, so expect delays through there. If you want to avoid most of it, you can take I-75 to I-70 east to I-675 south and take exit 15 (Col Glenn Hwy) if you're going straight to the museum. Exits 16 and 17 will take you to the mall, hotels, and Wright State University areas. This doesn't seem as direct, but it's all interstate highways and you'll miss all but the start of the construction at I-75/70.

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 09-07-2009 06:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just got back from my weekend visit to the U.S Air force Museum in Dayton.

WOW. For anyone who has not been there, and interested in Aviation, this is one of the very best museums anywhere.

We headed out early Saturday morning; it is about an 8 hour drive from where we live outside Toronto. We arrived too late to do much Saturday. We stayed at the fairly new

Comfort Suite right across from the Museum. The location it great, but outside of the museum there is not much else around there. I did visit Huffmans Prarie which is nearby.

My wife is amazing about these things; next day she and my daughter took off shopping for most of Sunday and left me to walk around the hundreds of aircraft.

I was a kid at a candy store. I spent the better part of 6 hours wondering from building to building.

I spent an hour at the Experimental aircraft area located at Wright Patterson. Anyone who has not been there or not been there in awhile should know you need I.D and need to sign up for the bus, early because once the buses fill you are out of luck. The hanger is located on the base and they check ID.

I took some photos of the retired Air force One and government aircraft. But took many many photos of the experimental aircraft, in particular the X craft. I have seen the X15 at the NASM, but they have a small step ladder next the the X15 and I am amazed at how little room the cockpit has. I have always loved the lifting bodies, so standing next to the X24B and being able to wonder around pretty much on my own was great.

I found all of the galleries interesting but the Cold War, Viet Nam/Korean War and World War two eras the most interesting.

With the theory that every aircraft has a history, I was really amazed to see many of the aircraft whose personal stories have stood the test of time along with the pilots who flew them.

I also took a run through the Aviation Hall of fame which was great.

Of course I stopped to take a look around the Apollo 15 Command Module, and also the Gemini Blue and Mercury Spacecraft and also was looked around the collection of missiles and paraphernalia including the gondola use by Joe Kittinger his record parachute jump.

This morning (Sunday) we ended up spending another little while wondering around and

My 6 year old daughter, to my surprise loved the airplanes too. I have some great photos of her sitting in the cockpit section of an F4D (Dad was the RIO).

Unfortunately we spent so much time at the Museum this morning I did not have time to visit the Neil Armstrong Museum located I Wapakoneta on the way home. Next time.

In any case, all I can say is, anyone with an interest in aircraft and who has not been the the Museum of the U.S Air force, is missing one of the great aviation museums anywhere.

Needless to say, I also added several new books from the gift shop to my collection including two books on the X15 and the autobiography of Jimmy Dolittle which has been difficult to find.

Needless to say, a great weekend.

kr4mula
Member

Posts: 599
From: Cinci, OH
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 09-08-2009 10:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Glad you enjoyed it! It's hard to find anything bad to say about the museum, just from the sheer volume of historically significant aircraft that they have. I'd say it's a close second behind National Air and Space Museum for the position of best aviation museum in the US, if not wider!

My only quibble is that the R&D aircraft are treated a little like second class citizens, tucked away from the rest of the museum. The advantage, as you discovered, is that you can at least get up close and personal with them, more so than the ones at the main museum. But once they build the new hangar and get a space shuttle (I'm being optimistic), some of those (like the X-15) will move down to the main complex.

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 09-08-2009 10:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I did enjoy it very much Kevin. I agree it is one of the greatest aviation museums anywhere. My only regret is I did not have more time. I could have spent several days there and still not seen anything I wished to see.

I agree that perhaps the research aircraft could be better displayed and I also hope they do get a shuttle for display. It would be an amazing addition to an already great collection.

On the other hand I was able to get right up close to the aircraft and able to examine them up close and personal as you said and could not ask for more. I was amazed at the lack of headroom for the X-15.

I went early and the museum was not busy until later in the day. There were times when I had almost an entire section of the display hanger to myself. I was able to take many photos without anyone else in them; just the aircraft alone which is very rare at most air museums. I always liked the F-4 and was glad I was finally able to see Robin Olds F-4c Scat XVII.

The Apollo 15 command module had no one around it and I was able to photograph it in detail.

They also have a good gift shop and I was able to finally purchase "Hypersonic! The Story of the North American X-15" and the companion "X-15 Scrap Book". I was also able buy a copy of the autobiography of Jimmy Doolittle "I Could Never Be So Lucky Again".

I really enjoyed the visit. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in aviation.

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2012 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement