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  Artemis crewed lunar lander solicitations

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Author Topic:   Artemis crewed lunar lander solicitations
Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 42323
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-12-2019 11:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Seeks US Partners to Develop Reusable Systems to Land Astronauts on Moon

As the next major step to return astronauts to the Moon under Space Policy Directive-1, NASA announced plans on Dec. 13 to work with American companies to design and develop new reusable systems for astronauts to land on the lunar surface. The agency is planning to test new human-class landers on the Moon beginning in 2024, with the goal of sending crew to the surface in 2028.

Above: Artist's concept of a human landing system and its crew on the lunar surface with Earth near the horizon.

Through multi-phased lunar exploration partnerships, NASA is asking American companies to study the best approach to landing astronauts on the Moon and start the development as quickly as possible with current and future anticipated technologies.

"Building on our model in low-Earth orbit, we'll expand our partnerships with industry and other nations to explore the Moon and advance our missions to farther destinations such as Mars, with America leading the way," said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. "When we send astronauts to the surface of the Moon in the next decade, it will be in a sustainable fashion."

The agency's leading approach to sending humans to the Moon is using a system of three separate elements that will provide transfer, landing, and safe return. A key aspect of this proposed approach is to use the Gateway for roundtrip journeys to and from the surface of the Moon.

Using the Gateway to land astronauts on the Moon allows the first building blocks for fully reusable lunar landers. Initially NASA expects two of the lander elements to be reusable and refueled by cargo ships carrying fuel from Earth to the Gateway. The agency is also working on technologies to make rocket propellants using water ice and regolith from the Moon. Once the ability to harness resources from the Moon for propellant becomes viable, NASA plans to refuel these elements with the Moon's own resources. This process, known as in-situ resource utilization or ISRU, will make the third element also refuelable and reusable.

NASA published a formal request for proposals to an appendix of the second Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP-2) Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) on Feb. 7, and responses are due March 25.

According to the solicitation, NASA will fund industry-led development and flight demonstrations of lunar landers built for astronauts by supporting critical studies and risk reduction activities to advance technology requirements, tailor applicable standards, develop technology, and perform initial demonstrations by landing on the Moon.

When NASA again sends humans to the Moon, the surface will be buzzing with new research and robotic activity, and there will be more opportunities for discovery than ever before. Private sector innovation is key to these NASA missions, and the NextSTEP public-private partnership model is advancing capabilities for human spaceflight while stimulating commercial activities in space.

The President's direction from Space Policy Directive-1 galvanizes NASA's return to the Moon and builds on progress on the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft, efforts with commercial and international partners, and knowledge gained from current robotic presence at the Moon and Mars.

SpaceAholic
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Posts: 4389
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-12-2019 11:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As part of this Phase A offering, NASA says it will make "multiple awards" valued at between $300,000 to $9 million to various companies.
Companies may bid on one or all three elements of NASA's proposed landing system — a Transfer vehicle that will move astronauts to and from the Lunar Gateway to low-lunar orbit, a Descent vehicle that will carry humans down to the surface, and an Ascent vehicle that will carry the crew back to lunar orbit.

After this Phase A, NASA says it will select "zero, one, or two" awards for design and development and that such fixed-price contracts will be valued at "multiple hundreds of millions of dollars." Because the "Descent" element is expected to fly first, NASA says that such proposals "are expected to receive a majority of overall funding." Participating firms are expected to share costs with NASA, which means they are supposed to invest about 20 percent of their own funding into lander development.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 02-15-2019 09:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA is now emphasizing speed in its lunar exploration plans, reports SpaceNews.
Proposals for this broad agency announcement (BAA), part of NASA's Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP) program, are due March 25. Bill Gerstenmaier, NASA associate administrator for human exploration and operations, said the agency hopes to make awards in May to allow the six-month studies to begin by July. After that, NASA could select some of those concepts for additional work, including hardware development.

The studies are intended to fit into NASA's existing reference architecture, which has focused on three-stage landing systems involving a tug, descent stage and ascent stage. Gerstenmaier said that NASA will wait to study an ascent vehicle to see if human rating requirements can be restricted to just that component of the overall system.

Gerstenmaier said there's some willingness to consider alternative architectures, although not within this specific announcement. "We're not totally closed if there are some proposals that come in that are different, that want to reflect a totally different architecture," he said. "They won't necessarily be part of this BAA study, but we'll take those off to the side."

"We'll go take that proposal that's outside, we'll figure out another instrument and a way to work with them to see what's there, and then trade that later against this architecture to see if it's better," he said later.

...the architecture that Gerstenmaier presented at the industry day still called for landing people on the moon by 2028.

denali414
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posted 02-16-2019 09:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for denali414   Click Here to Email denali414     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Seems we are really trying to up the time frame and get more companies and commercial enterprises involved to really establish a "moon presence" again.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 04-26-2019 07:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA has broadened the scope from the Human Landing System's (HLS) Ascent Element to a complete integrated lander that incorporates multiple elements such as a Descent Element, Ascent Element and Transfer Vehicle.
In response to Vice President Mike Pence's recent announcement directing NASA to return humans to the surface of the Moon by 2024, NASA has assessed options for meeting this challenge by accelerating development of the Human Landing System. Accordingly, NASA intends to release a solicitation under the second Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP-2) Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) in late May, 2019, to seek proposals from industry for the development of integrated human lunar landers and execution of crewed flight demonstrations to the lunar surface by 2024.

The primary objective of this NextSTEP-2 Appendix H BAA (HLS - Integrated Lander), is to: enable the rapid development of individual lander elements such as a Descent Element, Ascent Element, and Transfer Vehicle; achieve the integration of these elements into a safe and functional human landing system that can meet NASA and industry requirements; and execute a crewed demonstration mission of that human landing system to the Moon. Contracts awarded under Appendix H may have multiple phases including but not limited to Design, Development, Test, and Evaluation of the applicable lander elements.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-16-2019 06:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Taps 11 American Companies to Advance Human Lunar Landers

NASA has selected 11 companies to conduct studies and produce prototypes of human landers for its Artemis lunar exploration program. This effort will help put American astronauts — the first woman and next man — on the Moon's south pole by 2024 and establish sustainable missions by 2028.

"To accelerate our return to the Moon, we are challenging our traditional ways of doing business. We will streamline everything from procurement to partnerships to hardware development and even operations," said Marshall Smith, director for human lunar exploration programs at NASA Headquarters. "Our team is excited to get back to the Moon quickly as possible, and our public/private partnerships to study human landing systems are an important step in that process."

Through Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP) Appendix E contracts, the selected companies will study and/or develop prototypes during the next six months that reduce schedule risk for the descent, transfer, and refueling elements of a potential human landing system.

NASA's proposed plan is to transport astronauts in a human landing system that includes a transfer element for the journey from the lunar Gateway to low-lunar orbit, a descent element to carry them to the surface, and an ascent element to return to them to the Gateway. The agency also is looking at refueling capabilities to make these systems reusable.

The total award amount for all companies is $45.5 million. As NextSTEP is a public/private partnership program, companies are required to contribute at least 20% of the total project cost. This partnership will reduce costs to taxpayers and encourage early private investments in the lunar economy.

The awardees, from eight states across the country, are:

  • Aerojet Rocketdyne – Canoga Park, California
    One transfer vehicle study

  • Blue Origin – Kent, Washington
    One descent element study, one transfer vehicle study, and one transfer vehicle prototype

  • Boeing – Houston
    One descent element study, two descent element prototypes, one transfer vehicle study, one transfer vehicle prototype, one refueling element study, and one refueling element prototype

  • Dynetics – Huntsville, Alabama
    One descent element study and five descent element prototypes

  • Lockheed Martin – Littleton, Colorado
    One descent element study, four descent element prototypes, one transfer vehicle study, and one refueling element study

  • Masten Space Systems – Mojave, California
    One descent element prototype

  • Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems – Dulles, Virginia
    One descent element study, four descent element prototypes, one refueling element study, and one refueling element prototype

  • OrbitBeyond – Edison, New Jersey
    Two refueling element prototypes

  • Sierra Nevada Corporation, Louisville, Colorado, and Madison, Wisconsin
    One descent element study, one descent element prototype, one transfer vehicle study, one transfer vehicle prototype, and one refueling element study

  • SpaceX – Hawthorne, California
    One descent element study

  • SSL – Palo Alto, California
    One refueling element study and one refueling element prototype
To expedite the work, NASA is invoking undefinitized contract actions, which allow the agency to authorize partners to start a portion of the work, while negotiations toward contract award continue in parallel.

"We're taking major steps to begin development as quickly as possible, including invoking a NextSTEP option that allows our partners to begin work while we're still negotiating," said Greg Chavers, human landing system formulation manager at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. "We're keen to collect early industry feedback about our human landing system requirements, and the undefinitized contract action will help us do that."

NASA gave industry its first heads up in April, with the issuance of a pre-solicitation, of its intention to partner with American companies on the development of an integrated lander. The formal solicitation, to be issued this summer, will provide the requirements for a 2024 human landing, and leave it to U.S. industry to propose innovative concepts, hardware development and integration.

"This new approach doesn't prescribe a specific design or number of elements for the human landing system," Chavers said. "NASA needs the system to get our astronauts on the surface and return them home safely, and we're leaving a lot of the specifics to our commercial partners."

SpaceAholic
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Posts: 4389
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-23-2019 11:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Solicitation
NASA intends to release a solicitation under the second Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP-2) BAA to seek proposals from industry for the development of integrated human lunar landers and execution of crewed flight demonstrations to the lunar surface by 2024.

The primary objective of this NextSTEP-2 Appendix H BAA (HLS - Integrated Lander) is to enable the rapid development of a safe and functional human landing system (HLS) that can meet NASA and industry requirements and execute a crewed demonstration mission of HLS to the Moon no later than 2024. To achieve long-term lunar lander sustainability, this BAA also has a contract option that NASA may elect to exercise for the development and, in 2026, demonstration of a sustainable HLS Integrated Lander in order to enable more permanent human access to the lunar surface.

NASA anticipates that it will initially award multiple HLS contracts, followed by potential down-selection among these HLS contractors as work progresses through the exercise of options at various stages of the development effort.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 42323
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-30-2019 01:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Seeks Input from U.S. Industry on Artemis Lander Development

Update August 30, 2019

NASA has issued a second draft of NextSTEP H, integrated human landing system. This updated draft reflects changes NASA has made to address industry feedback following the first draft that was issued in July. Draft 2 is available for download here.

Responses to draft 2 are due Sept. 6. NASA anticipates issuing the final solicitation this fall, with the intent to select providers this winter.

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