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  My personal Apollo story (Dan Schaiewitz) (Page 14)

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Author Topic:   My personal Apollo story (Dan Schaiewitz)
Daniel on the Moon
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Posts: 308
From: Bronxville, NY
Registered: Jun 2015

posted 10-05-2017 04:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daniel on the Moon   Click Here to Email Daniel on the Moon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Very perceptive questions.
quote:
Originally posted by MCroft04:
Were there procedures to insure that changes to flight hardware were quickly communicated to you?
There were no formal procedures to communicate changes to me. We were dealing with a fully documented, regulated flight hardware program and a NON-documented NON-regulated training program with respect to Full Scale Mockups, Cryopacks, Airpacks, Water Cooling Packs and other training support hardware.

It was, in fact, my responsibility to know what modifications were made to the flight hardware and make sure those modifications were incorporated into the training mockups. Keep in mind that I worked with the flight PLSS/OPS/RCU on a daily basis so I attended meetings that involved flight hardware changes and procedures. All memos both internally at KSC and from our Hamilton Standard home office in Windsor Locks, Conn. were either directed to me or cc'd to me so it was a matter of being "diligently dedicated" while accomplishing my responsibility.

I'll present to you a few examples pertaining to maintaining identical flight and mockup configurations.

Graphic (A) below represents a page in one of my Apollo 11 notebooks. The pink highlighted section reads as follows:

Went through Apollo 11 EVA procedures using crew training mockups to determine the acceptability of the mockups for crew training usage. Found the following differences between the mockups and flight hardware.
  1. The mockup has a CO2 sensor and associated new upper conformal pad.

  2. Mockup does not have gas separator

  3. Mockup does not have relocated stowage plate.

  4. J5 dust caps missing.

  5. Jim lovell's upper left harness has snap on wrong side.

  6. RCU dust covers missing.

  7. Battery locking device different from flight hardware.
Graphic (B) below represents a page from one of my Apollo 12 notebooks. The pink highlighted section reads as follows:
  1. I inspected and went through a functional check list of the mockup hardware to prepare for stowage in the LM mockup.

  2. Made up a list of differences between mockup and flight hardware and malfunctions found during functional check of mockups.
With respect to making sure Flight and Mockup hardware configurations were continually updated, I wrote "formal" QUICK LOOK REPORTS, Reference Graphic (C-1) and (C-2) below. As LM-5 PLSS/OPS Mission Manager, I wrote the below report titled: LM-5 Pre EVA Crew Training Procedure. This specific report related to a procedure on June 12, 1969.

Reference Report Page (2) below. It reads as follows: On June 12, 1969, HSD/KSC supported a Pre EVA Crew Training procedure. The following mockup hardware was utilized:

  1. Two PLSS hi-fi mockups
  2. Two OPS mockups
  3. Two RCU mockups
  4. Two PLSS light weight mockups
Apollo 11 backup astronauts Fred Haise and James Lovell successfully performed the pre EVA procedures which involved unstowing, checking out and donning the EMU hardware in the lunar module cabin. The astronauts were pleased with the condition and operation of the PLSS, OPS and RCU mockups.

The astronauts were made aware of the following differences between the mockup and flight hardware:

  1. The PLSS mockups incorporate a CO2 sensor and associated new upper conformal pad that will not be incorporated for the Apollo 11 flight.

  2. The PLSS mockups do not incorporate the recently added gas separator.

  3. The PLSS mockups do not have the relocated electrical umbilical stowage plate.

  4. The PLSS mockups do not have the new PLSS thermal garment which incorporates a flap to gain access to the gas separator and no longer interfaces with the lower conformal pad.

  5. The RCU mockup Camera Mount bracket can slide off the RCU Camera Mount plate if the bracket release lever is held in the dismount position.

  6. A new lower conformal pad without protruding snaps and screws will be incorporated on the flight hardware in the very near future.
quote:
Did you ever receive feedback from an astronaut that their final flight hardware (when they reached the moon) was different from the training hardware?
"NO" and proud to give you that answer!

Daniel on the Moon
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Posts: 308
From: Bronxville, NY
Registered: Jun 2015

posted 10-11-2017 01:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daniel on the Moon   Click Here to Email Daniel on the Moon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In my most recent post, I referenced the use of PLSS/OPS full scale mockups in a Quick Look Report memo that I wrote discussing the results of a LM-5 Pre EVA crew training procedure. This procedure was conducted inside the LM mockup.

Before every pre- or post-training exercise inside the mockup LM, the LM had to be configured for the specific exercise. This may sound like an easy task, but remember, missions had up to three EVAs and each pre and post procedure required different LM configurations.

The below three pages from a specific EVA-11 prep and post LM mockup configuration document was giving to me one to two days before the exercise. With the document in hand, I and one of my techs drove to the crew training building and along with a suit tech and CSD EVA prep and post test conductor configured the mockup as written in the referenced document.

I'm sure those of you intrigued by the detailed nuances of the Apollo program will appreciate examining the below pages.

Daniel on the Moon
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Posts: 308
From: Bronxville, NY
Registered: Jun 2015

posted 10-11-2017 11:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daniel on the Moon   Click Here to Email Daniel on the Moon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With cS, e-mail, messaging and social media, have you ever imagined the voice that might be associated with your contacts?

I'm in the imagine column. For those of you in that column that have wondered what I would say and sound like if I met you and we carried on a conversation about my incredible Apollo Program experiences, imagine no further.

You can listen to a podcast that was recorded by RR Auctions discussing my Apollo experiences as they relate to memorabilia from my collection that is included in the RR space auction that begins today.

Daniel on the Moon
Member

Posts: 308
From: Bronxville, NY
Registered: Jun 2015

posted 10-18-2017 12:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daniel on the Moon   Click Here to Email Daniel on the Moon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As I've stated on more than one occasion, I am the "luckiest man in the world!"

Being as intimately involved in the Apollo program as I was, there were so, so many fascinating details that I thoroughly enjoy sharing with cS members. I hope that my posts continue to be as interesting to you as they are to me.

Following is a great example of a "detail" that when you think about it, you might say to yourself, "Wow, another Apollo fact that I never considered!"

Here it is: Before each and every Apollo mission an exact vehicle earth liftoff and lunar liftoff weight had to be established for obvious reasons. Going through my boxes and boxes of Apollo paperwork that I saved (I saved every document that related to my Apollo experience), I came across one of the many interesting memos that I wrote. In this case the attached "Quick Look Report" (Graphic 3 below) describing a test procedure and test results to determine the weight of the Oxygen in the Oxygen Purge System bottles (Graphics 2 and 3 below).

When you think about it, adding the weight of an intangible object to include in the total weight of the spacecraft is not something, quite honestly, I would have considered!

The referenced Quick Look Report (Graphic 3) is self explanatory. The results of the report establishing the weight of the Oxygen in the OPS bottles at 5.85 lbs is to me fascinating!

Kite
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Posts: 670
From: Northampton UK
Registered: Nov 2009

posted 10-18-2017 04:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kite     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Your broadcast was absolutely fascinating Dan. You sound as clear and precise as you write. We are so lucky to have you on collectSPACE to recollect your amazing experience with the Apollo programme. Good luck with the auction.

Daniel on the Moon
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Posts: 308
From: Bronxville, NY
Registered: Jun 2015

posted 10-18-2017 05:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daniel on the Moon   Click Here to Email Daniel on the Moon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you for your kind and motivating words.

Daniel on the Moon
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Posts: 308
From: Bronxville, NY
Registered: Jun 2015

posted 10-20-2017 07:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daniel on the Moon   Click Here to Email Daniel on the Moon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When I previously discussed the use of the PLSS/OPS full scale Mmckups, I related how they were used inside the crew training LM. Performing LM prep and Post procedures inside the LM was the ideal scenario, however, the downside of working in the enclosed confines of the LM was that critical test conductor and tech observation was limited.

We therefore conducted the majority of LM prep and post procedures in an open area of the crew training building. As I discussed in a previous post, a LM engine cover and step to simulate the space in the LM used to don and doff the PLSS/OPS was fabricated.

You've seen many photos depicting LM pre and post procedures in the open space of the crew training building so that's nothing new. What is new is a reminder that the PLSS/OPS full scale mockups are one of four PLSS/OPS training configurations that were required to practice both lunar surface and LM procedures vs one flight PLSS/OPS.

Each PLSS/OPS training configuration required a source of breathable air, cooling and suit pressurization. When completely suited during LM prep and post procedures using the PLSS/OPS full scale mockups, breathable air was provided by using the air supply from the Air Console Unit (A) in the below photo.

With the mockup PLSS oxygen inlet and outlet hoses disconnected, hanging free, the air console inlet and outlet air supply hoses (B) were connected to the suit inlet and outlet oxygen connectors and provided air to the suited crewman. As you can see in the photo, there were two sets of inlet and outlet hoses for both the CDR and LMP.

Daniel on the Moon
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Posts: 308
From: Bronxville, NY
Registered: Jun 2015

posted 10-22-2017 12:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daniel on the Moon   Click Here to Email Daniel on the Moon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
During one of the early Apollo 11 EVA Crew Training Exercises, the idea of a "wrist checklist" was initiated by astronaut Neil Armstrong when he suggested that there should be a written task reminder or as we might refer to today as an "action item list." The task reminder evolved into a checklist that could be secured to the astronaut's EVA glove and was logically named a "wrist checklist."

Since both Armstrong as CDR and Aldrin as LMP had different lunar surface tasks to accomplish, there were two individualized checklists. The photo below represents the first attempt at creating a "wrist checklist."

The below prototype wrist checklist reflects the tasks performed by Aldrin as LMP. Note that tasks in parentheses, i.e. (TV DEPLOY), etc. are tasks to be accomplished by Armstrong as CDR. These tasks, in parentheses, are just a reminder for the LMP. The CDR checklist also had important LMP tasks in parentheses.

Following is a photo of LMP Aldrin wearing the prototype wrist checklist during an EVA crew training exercise:

After noticing that the wrist checklists did not remain in the installed position, i.e. they rotated on the wrist, it was decided to permanently sew the words of the checklist to the astronaut gloves as seen in the below photo. The words fit in the designated area of the glove and could be easily read by the crew.

Subsequent Apollo missions involved considerably more tasks and a new concept had to be created to include entire mission tasks.

The below photo depicts the final wrist checklist concept used that included a spiral binder with plastic pages that were turned by the astronaut as he proceeded through his tasks.

Tykeanaut
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From: Worcestershire, England, UK.
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 10-22-2017 09:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great podcast, erudite and clear. You must write a book Dan?

Daniel on the Moon
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From: Bronxville, NY
Registered: Jun 2015

posted 10-22-2017 10:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daniel on the Moon   Click Here to Email Daniel on the Moon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you for your interest. Let's toast a "Real Ale" to your suggestion!

Kite
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Posts: 670
From: Northampton UK
Registered: Nov 2009

posted 10-22-2017 11:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kite     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I say "CHEERS" to that!

Daniel on the Moon
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Posts: 308
From: Bronxville, NY
Registered: Jun 2015

posted 10-22-2017 12:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daniel on the Moon   Click Here to Email Daniel on the Moon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One of the skills that Apollo 15 CDR Dave Scott learned during his geology training was the need to gain a visual perspective of the landing site that he was about to explore.

With this in mind, he requested mission planners to schedule a Stand-Up EVA (SEVA) a couple of hours after touchdown in which he would stand on the ascent engine cover, poke his helmeted head through LM's top hatch and photograph his surroundings.

Practicing the SEVA in the LM mockup was easier said than done. Scott insisted on rehearsing the SEVA procedure fully suited and pressurized to confirm that he was able to "poke" his head through the LM overhead hatch and move a 500 MM camera lens attached to the Hasselblad through the hatch, successfully taking the desired photos.

It was an interesting day as we had to reroute the air supply hose through the overhead hatch to Scott's suit inlet oxygen connector. There was Scott, his head and camera poked through the hatch and the air hose inadvertently getting in his way. At one point during the procedure, the hose wrapped around his helmet. I wish I had photos to show you. Bottom line though, everyone was satisfied with the procedure.

After the mission, Scott said "The SEVA was a useful experience. One of our problems at Hadley (the landing site), was that the resolution of the Lunar Orbiter photography was only 60 feet, so they couldn't prepare a detailed map. The maps we had were best guesses and we had the radar people tell us before the flight that there were boulder fields at the landing site so a rational reason for the stand-up EVA was to look and see if we could drive the rover, because if there were boulder fields down there, and nobody could prove there were no boulder fields, it changed the whole picture."

The view set his mind at ease, appearing to totally contradict his pre-flight fears. The Rover "trafficability," as Scott put it, would be excellent.

Another reason for the SEVA was that people in the world of geology supported the SEVA, and said yes, that will be useful geologically getting photos from the vantage point of the hatch at the highest point of the LM, especially using, for the first time, a 500mm camera lens and having a stable platform by resting the camera on the flat circumference around the open hatch.

Why was there no Stand Up EVA (SEVA) on Apollo 16 or 17? The timing of Apollo 15's landing meant that Scott and Irwin had already been awake for 11 hours. It wouldn't have been wise to then send them out on a full EVA but it would have also been unrealistic to expect them to go to sleep knowing the moon was just outside the window!

The stand-up EVA filled the gap, while also allowing Scott to get a good idea of the landing site's geography in preparation for driving the lunar rover.

Both Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 were scheduled such that the astronauts would depart on their first EVA soon after landing. And the Apollo 17 moon walkers did just that.

Apollo 16 astronauts would have as well, but their landing was delayed by six hours as they worked out a problem with the command module's engine control system. Young and Duke landed having been awake for 13 hours but having not planned for a stand-up EVA, they started their first outing the next day.

SaturnV
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From: Fowler, Ohio, USA
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posted 11-30-2017 06:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SaturnV   Click Here to Email SaturnV     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dan, Oh my goodness, what a treasure chest of information you have! How wonderful for us that you found this forum and have taken the time to share your experiences. Several posts ago you detailed the EMU design. Are you aware if the astronauts ever had to utilize it for any suit repairs like scuffing or perhaps O-ring lubrication?

oly
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From: Perth, Western Australia
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posted 11-30-2017 09:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dan, Somehow I missed your post on the Apollo 15 SEVA. Thank you for posting the information. I was aware that the geologists wanted the SEAV but had not thought that they also checked the terrain for the Lunar Rover work. It makes a lot of sense.

Daniel on the Moon
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From: Bronxville, NY
Registered: Jun 2015

posted 12-01-2017 12:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daniel on the Moon   Click Here to Email Daniel on the Moon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I personally am not aware of crewman using the EMU Maintenance Kit however, it is possible that it may have been used with its use not being significant and documented (in communications) but not being included in post mission reports.


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