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  Astronaut Mike Massimino's post-NASA career

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Author Topic:   Astronaut Mike Massimino's post-NASA career
Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 30110
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-29-2014 02:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
Astronaut Mike Massimino departs NASA for university position

After almost two decades with NASA, including two space shuttle missions, astronaut Mike Massimino left the space agency Monday (July 28) for a full-time position with Columbia University in New York.

Massimino’s experience at NASA includes two shuttle missions to service the agency's Hubble Space Telescope. During the final servicing mission, STS-125 in 2009, Massimino became the first astronaut to tweet from space, which led to a significant social media following.

“Mike has played a significant role within the astronaut office in his time here,” said Bob Behnken, Chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. “His technical expertise was extremely helpful in the many roles he fulfilled, not the least of which was his part in the successful Hubble servicing missions.”

“Mike embraced the opportunity to engage with the public in new ways and set the stage for more space explorers to be able to share their mission experience directly with people around the globe. We wish him well in his new role fostering the dreams and innovations of students just beginning their career paths,” Behnken said.

A native of New York, Massimino earned his undergraduate degree from Columbia University and went on to accrue four additional degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He holds two master's degrees, one in mechanical engineering and a second in technology and policy, and a doctorate in mechanical engineering.

Massimino joined NASA in 1996. Prior to his first spaceflight assignment, he served in the Astronaut Office Robotics Branch and in the Astronaut Office Extravehicular Activity (EVA, or spacewalk) Branch. Following his first spaceflight, he served in 2002 as a spacecraft communicator in mission control and as the Astronaut Office Technical Liaison to Johnson’s EVA Program Office.

He also logged more than 570 hours in space, including 30 hours of spacewalks. His first mission was STS-109 in 2002, during which the seven-person Columbia crew successfully upgraded Hubble with a new power unit, Advanced Camera for Surveys, and solar arrays. STS-109 set a mission record for spacewalk time with 35 hours and 55 minutes over five spacewalks. Massimino performed two spacewalks during STS-109 totaling 14 hours and 46 minutes.

During STS-125, Massimino spent six days servicing and upgrading Hubble with the assistance of crewmates aboard shuttle Atlantis. STS-125 overtook the record set on STS-109, with 36 hours and 56 minutes over five spacewalks. Massimino’s spacewalks on this mission totaled 15 hours and 58 minutes.

dogcrew5369
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Posts: 611
From: Statesville, NC
Registered: Mar 2009

posted 07-29-2014 04:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dogcrew5369   Click Here to Email dogcrew5369     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good luck to Mass. He will always be one of the best at commentary and a joy to follow him at NASA. I just wish he could have flown to the ISS.

Ronpur
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Posts: 516
From: Brandon, Fl
Registered: May 2012

posted 07-29-2014 08:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ronpur   Click Here to Email Ronpur     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dogcrew5369:
I just wish he could have flown to the ISS.
He did! With Howard Wolowitz and Dimitri Rezinov on Expedition 31!!

Seriously, best of luck to Mike! What a great ambassador for NASA he has been!

Neil DC
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Posts: 40
From: Middletown, NJ, USA
Registered: May 2010

posted 07-29-2014 08:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Neil DC   Click Here to Email Neil DC     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It will be great to have him in the New York City area for the long term. Hopefully there will be many more space related events with him and his NASA colleagues. Rather like Jeff Hoffman at MIT and Don Thomas at Towson Univ.

issman1
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Posts: 909
From: UK
Registered: Apr 2005

posted 07-30-2014 10:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dogcrew5369:
I just wish he could have flown to the ISS.

Agree wholeheartedly. NASA missed a trick by denying Massimino an ISS expedition/visit.

At a critical time in its history, Massimino was the most telegenic of NASA's astronauts. They need to sell the programme to the taxpaying US public. Anyone who has watched the "Inside ISS" features with Massimino knows what I mean.

I just hope Scott Kelly takes a leaf from him during the One-Year Mission.

Michael Cassutt
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Posts: 281
From: Studio City CA USA
Registered: Mar 2005

posted 07-30-2014 05:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Michael Cassutt   Click Here to Email Michael Cassutt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Massimino wasn't "denied" an ISS visit: he, like STS-125 commander Scott Altman, was too tall for Soyuz. NASA would have loved to have him making transmissions from orbit.

Delta7
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Posts: 1229
From: Ossian IN USA
Registered: Oct 2007

posted 07-30-2014 08:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yet presumably he could've held out for the commercial crew vehicle...

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 30110
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-30-2014 09:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Commercial crew doesn't waive the requirement for station crew members to be able to fly in the Soyuz. As was reaffirmed this week, NASA still intends astronauts to continue to fly on Soyuz even after commercial crew is flying, and in an onboard emergency, crew members will need to be able to return to Earth on either type of vehicle.

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