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Author Topic:   Bonhams April 2010 Space History Sale
Larry McGlynn
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posted 03-07-2010 10:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bonhams release
Mankind's Race for the Moon Celebrated at Bonhams

An annual auction that celebrates space flight, from the earliest experiments to the present day, The Space History Sale is set to take place at Bonhams in New York on Tuesday April 13. Featuring over 290 lots, the sale contains objects and ephemera from all of the most memorable NASA space flight programs including Mercury, Gemini and Apollo, and the Space Shuttle.

"We're proud to continue this annual New York auction of Space History," says Matthew Haley, Bonhams Specialist. "The auction features items that hark back to the first golden age of space exploration, when man sought to reach the moon, along with lots that celebrate what came before and after these monumental trips to the lunar surface."

With the Apollo missions capturing the public imagination like no other space program, objects from this series of voyages feature prominently in the sale. Of particular note are a number of truly remarkable Apollo lots that are set to entice international interest, from both private and institutional buyers.

Apollo 13

Forty years to the day of the Bonhams auction, Apollo 13, the third lunar mission to the moon, suffered an oxygen tank explosion, and the crew famously radioed back the words, 'Houston, we've had a problem.' The emergency checklist list from that flight, used and marked after the explosion by the Apollo 13 crew on April 13, 1970, will be offered in the sale - it serves as a poignant reminder of the precarious state the three astronauts' lives were in.

During the emergency, the crew had to stabilize and re-align their spacecraft while saving enough power and oxygen to survive the long voyage back home. Their survival and safe return to earth is one of the most celebrated triumphs of American 20th century space flight (estimate: $20,000-30,000).

Apollo 11

Directly consigned from Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins, a mission patch flown to the moon is a leading lot in the auction and is signed by all three Apollo 11 astronauts (estimate: $40,000-60,000).

A diamond and gold pin given to Deke Slayton, NASA Director of Flight Crew Operations, is an extraordinary artifact whose history spans the Apollo program, from the tragic lows to the triumphant highs. Presented to Slayton by the widows of the Apollo 1 astronauts who died in the flash fire at the Cape Canaveral launchpad in 1967, it had originally been planned as a gift to Slayton from the Apollo 1 astronauts themselves. After receiving the pin, Deke lent it to Neil Armstrong, who took it to the lunar surface on Apollo 11 (estimate: $80,000-120,000).

Another notable Apollo 11 lot is a flight plan sheet signed and inscribed by Neil Armstrong, 'One small step for a man -- one giant leap for mankind'. Given to John McLeaish, NASA press officer, by Neil Armstrong while both were in quarantine after the trip, this is particularly unusual as Armstrong has said he never wrote this phrase for anyone, and no other example has ever come to auction (estimate: $60,000-80,000).

j0s9
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From: Clinton, MA, USA
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posted 03-07-2010 11:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for j0s9   Click Here to Email j0s9     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm very impressed with the estimate price of several lots; as an example lot 1040, Liberty Bell 7 Film, which was yesterday sold at the Lunar Legacies auction for $110 (without fees and shipping) has an estimate of $600-$800. A similar film was recently sold (about 2 weeks ago) at eBay for less than $100 (including shipping).

GerryM
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posted 03-07-2010 11:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GerryM   Click Here to Email GerryM     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not really impressed with lot #1088, the Edward White signed Gemini 4 signed litho.

davidcwagner
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From: Albuquerque, New Mexico
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posted 03-07-2010 02:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for davidcwagner   Click Here to Email davidcwagner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Lot 1161: This appears to be a genuine First Word's quote written and signed by Neil Armstrong. I have never seen another. Any comments?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-07-2010 02:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Lot 1161 is the exact piece to which I referred in "First Man" (Hansen) and which Armstrong disputes, as noted in the auction description.
The ultimate Armstrong memento, Pearlman relates, would be a signed picture or letter that includes Neil's famous quote "one small step." For years it was believed that no authentic examples of such an item existed. Recently, "an authentic example," signed while Neil was still in quarantine, surfaced and though it never sold, many thought it could easily reach $25,000, if not higher.

Armstrong categorically denounces any such item as a fake. "I know that to be false, because I have never, ever quoted myself. From day one, I never did that. So it doesn't exist anywhere. Not for my mom, not for the Smithsonian, not for anybody -- there is not one anywhere. Not in quarantine or any other time. I never did one."

This piece has been discussed at least once previously on collectSPACE: Armstrong-inscribed "One small step"

randyc
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From: Highlands Ranch, CO USA
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posted 03-07-2010 02:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for randyc   Click Here to Email randyc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Technically what he wrote on the page is not EXACTLY what he said as he stepped on the Moon, since the word "that's" is missing from the start of the statement. It should say: "That's one small step....

That being said, I wouldn't mind having it in my collection!

NJSPACEFAN
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posted 03-07-2010 03:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NJSPACEFAN   Click Here to Email NJSPACEFAN     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've read the book, and Armstrong's strong denial. However, I am whole heartedly unconvinced. With the significant amount of writing which is identical to his - this would be saying this man who shared the time in quarantine with him is one of the best forgers to date.

Several other luminaries made very emphatic denials however untrue - FDR said he would never sign a franking signature on an envelope as it was illegal as a sitting president - and postage must be paid - he did however sign two for a noted friend who collected franked envelopes of presidents; Gerald Ford actually wrote a letter stating he had "never" signed a copy of the pardon of Richard Nixon - however he has signed quite a few, the same be said of the photo of the five living presidents which only a two dozen were to be signed for each other and charity, more were signed; Joe Dimaggio had a physical sign, which I've seen at signings, saying he would not sign bats, or any items which had a likeness of Marilyn Monroe - he did sign bats for a high fee, and he signed a copy of the first Playboy magazine with Marilyn on the cover for Barry Halper; Mickey Mantle would never ever sign bats, but did for a high fee for certain dealers.

This Armstrong item was first offered on eBay - and if I recall the starting price at the time time was $50,000 (but I may be wrong on the low side). The book came out much later. I believe Armstrong was incensed that a favor he did for someone was going to result in windfall and it genuinely bothered him, much akin to the signed photos being signed for free for years. I think he either genuinely forgot, or he absolutely wants no one to benefit from his kindness in this unique gesture of friendship. The controversy over "for man" vs "for a man" was discussed by him after the quarantine, and for this item to have "a man" is consistent with what he believed he said at the time written.

Leonard Bernstein became incensed when he saw a musical quotation he wrote out and signed up for auction in Charles Hamilton's auction several decades ago. Hamilton wrote of it in his book and how Bernstein marched into his office in the '80s and said "I might as well hand over $50 (now worth much more) to anyone who asks for one - I will not do it again." He kept his word as far as musical quotations.

If I could afford this item - I'd but it, I do believe it is the real deal.

nasamad
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From: Essex, UK
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posted 03-07-2010 03:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for nasamad   Click Here to Email nasamad     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Take a look at lot 1236, I have NEVER seen anything flown this big in an auction!

(Don't reply to this for a while, I'm just popping out to buy another lottery ticket.)

kyra
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posted 03-07-2010 03:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kyra   Click Here to Email kyra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Most items appear overvaluated between 2 to 8 times actual value, in my opinion. This is the kind of auction where six and seven figure income folks that are "casual" collectors get their items to wow their friends.

But there are some really nice items.

SpaceAholic
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posted 03-07-2010 03:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by nasamad:
Take a look at lot 1236, I have NEVER seen anything flown this big in an auction!

Lunar orbited possibly but for Apollo flown artifacts in general, the CM117 parachute in my collection gives that docking ring a run as its substantially heavier and larger. There are most certainly other lunar orbited artifacts circulating in private collections that are comparable in either mass and/or volume (CM electronics for example).

Michael
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posted 03-08-2010 12:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Michael   Click Here to Email Michael     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I need a second opinion, Lot 1162 is a nice presentation but it doesn't say where it came from, yet the estimate is 20,000 to 30,000. Any comments?

Spacefest
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posted 03-08-2010 12:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spacefest   Click Here to Email Spacefest     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just like with Heritage and other auctions, I see a fair amount of lots originally sold on Astro-Auction, or through Novaspace.

I guess our prices are too low.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 03-19-2010 01:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bonhams attracted the attention of the Wall Street Journal:
American enthusiasm for the space program may have dimmed in recent decades -- what kid these days says they want to grow up to be an astronaut? -- but interest in space memorabilia is apparently strong. On April 13 in New York, Bonhams will hold The Space History Sale, featuring rare items from the pioneering days of the space program, like the flight checklist from Apollo 13 and a mission patch that belonged to Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins and went to the moon.

leslie
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posted 03-23-2010 07:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for leslie   Click Here to Email leslie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
LOT 1161: The buyer will have that in his possession and forever wonder... is it real? Even if I had the dough, I wouldn't touch it for that reason alone.

ilbasso
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posted 03-23-2010 08:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I like item 1208, the signed Julius Caesar DMA moon map with an estimated value of $2500-$3500. I recently found that same map for $4. I could fly first class to California, pay Buzz $350 to sign it, and still have money left over for a second signed copy!

On the other hand, lot 1234, flown Apollo 13 Beta cloth patch presentation, looks basically identical to this item from Novaspace. Bonham's estimate of $4,000 to $6,000 is significantly less than Novaspace's price of $8,800. A bargain!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-27-2010 06:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The UK media is running with lot 1161, the Armstrong "one small step..." inscribed flight plan page, as something -- at least in my opinion -- more than it is.
  • The Sun
    Moon flight plan 'A' real find
    The original flight plan from the first moon landing has emerged -- proving that astronaut Neil Armstrong had intended to say: "One small step for 'A' man, one giant leap for mankind."
  • Sunday Express
    One Small Note Proves Astronaut Neil Armstrong Really Fluffed His Lines
    It is one of the most-quoted statements of all time. But the debate over whether pioneer astronaut Neil Armstrong fluffed his lines while taking the first steps on the moon was finally settled yesterday.
To me, this claim -- that this document in any way proves what Armstrong said or did not say on the Moon, is nonsense on two accounts:
  1. For many years Armstrong has said he intended to say "for 'a' man," thus there is no great revelation by him having written the same; and,

  2. This document doesn't prove he didn't say "for 'a' man" and that the 'a' was lost in transmission. I'm not claiming he did or did not, but either way, to try to claim that this document solves that one way or another is pure rubbish.
I have to believe that this is the result of shoddy journalism rather than someone associated with this lot pitching an embellished story. Unfortunately, these types of stories have a tendency to snowball.

There are other issues with the stories, too. "The original flight plan from the first moon landing has emerged," writes The Sun, as if other copies of the flight plan do not exist, or as if Armstrong's words were written in the flight plan as a script. Worse, it implies that this was a flown flight plan page, or that it belonged to/was used by Armstrong, neither of which can be sustained by the provenance offered.

The Sun also writes, "Armstrong said in his autobiography he has never written the phrase down but experts believe he must have forgotten about writing it directly after his return to Earth." I would really like to know who the "experts" are who feel confident questioning Armstrong's memory.

I'm not saying the inscription is not real, but making the casual claim that Armstrong simply forgot seems more in place with an eBay lot description than with an auction of this caliber.

spaceflori
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posted 03-27-2010 10:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceflori   Click Here to Email spaceflori     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The good thing with all the press hype is that it is good for space memorabilia in general!

No matter how individuals judge the importance of this document - the media attention alone should launch the bids into higher spheres.

Tykeanaut
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posted 03-27-2010 10:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It is also featured in The Telegraph with an estimate of £55,000 being achievable!!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-27-2010 10:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by spaceflori:
The good thing with all the press hype is that it is good for space memorabilia in general!
While the media attention is likely to attract new interest in space memorabilia, that is hardly a valid reason to misrepresent the history and nature of the item(s) being sold.

The piece in question (lot 1161) has an interesting real story that embellishment shouldn't be necessary.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-27-2010 10:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by nasamad:
Take a look at lot 1236, I have NEVER seen anything flown this big in an auction!
An addendum now notes that this did not fly:
Unflown. Rather, this particular Command Module docking ring is a structural engineering component used during post-flight testing to determine the reasons for the probe's initial failures. It would seem that NASA recreated the conditions involved with the probe failure using a mixture of flown and unflown components. This ring was linked in NASA and NASM documents to several other components also associated with spacecraft 110 (Kittyhawk) that normally would have been jettisoned during flight.

The flown CM docking ring, the twin of this one, remained with the ascent stage of the Lunar Module Antares when it was jettisoned. Antares was then deliberately crashed into the moon's surface to simulate a "moonquake."

spaceflori
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posted 03-27-2010 11:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceflori   Click Here to Email spaceflori     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
While the media attention is likely to attract new interest in space memorabilia, that is hardly a valid reason to misrepresent the history and nature of the item(s) being sold. The piece in question (lot 1161) has an interesting real story that embellishment shouldn't be necessary.
Agree and disagree. It's certainly important to mention the real story but on the other hand do you think 99.99% of the population really cares about it?

Any story, no matter how wrong, adds to the aura of this piece - look at the blue and red famous Mauritius stamp cover - 150 years of fairy tales mixed with real facts. Nobody really cares about the letter itself now and the background story, but it's the most talked philatelic item in history and most likely the most expensive one, too.

This Armstrong piece has the best chances to play in the same league as few other pieces.

gliderpilotuk
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posted 03-27-2010 12:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
I have to believe that this is the result of shoddy journalism rather than someone associated with this lot pitching an embellished story.
You are clearly unfamiliar with The Sun newspaper. It is not renowned for promoting matters of cultural interest (unless that's culture with a capital "k"). It rarely strays beyond the realms of footballers, footballers' wives and footballers' mistresses, so, unlike you, I am inclined to see this as a story that has been "fed" to the media with a view to promotion.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-27-2010 12:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by spaceflori:
...on the other hand do you think 99.99% of the population really cares about it?
All the more reason why the media has the responsibility to report the facts as accurately as possible and even more importantly, why those with the facts -- the auction house, consignor, experts, et al. -- need to hold the media responsible if they get it wrong.
quote:
Originally posted by gliderpilotuk:
...so, unlike you, I am inclined to see this as a story that has been "fed" to the media with a view to promotion.
I can only hope that is not the situation. I am contemplating an article to debunk the UK media reports, so I will be calling Bonhams for comment this week.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

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From: Houston, TX
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posted 03-27-2010 01:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Daily Mail has now chimed in, further conflating the issue.
The extremely rare document is believed to be the only time the astronaut ever wrote the phrase...
If we are going to talk about beliefs, then this statement is wrong. There are at least two other "believed-to-be-authentic" pieces that display the full quote.

I would really like to find the person feeding the UK media these "facts," if they are not making it up for themselves.

moorouge
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posted 03-27-2010 05:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gliderpilotuk:
I am inclined to see this as a story that has been "fed" to the media with a view to promotion.
Having read the mentioned articles in the UK press all are by an anonymous staff reporter on the paper except for the Express which does name the writer.

I agree with Paul (gliderpilotuk) that the story has come from an agency.

divemaster
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posted 03-27-2010 07:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just like most auctions held in NY - going back to the Russian auction at Sotheby's in 1997(?) and Christie's in 1999 - there's always a buzz around these auctions and there are always a few key pieces that attract attention and bring in more money than they should bring in. However, sometimes sitting in the room is worth it just to watch the drama.

freshspot
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posted 03-28-2010 06:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for freshspot   Click Here to Email freshspot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My guess on the PR aspect is that it is either 1) Bonham's publicist, 2) an agency hired by Bonhams, or 3) someone affiliated with the consignor of the piece who is talking it up.

If anyone wants to check with Bonhams, here is the press release talking up the auction "Mankind's Race For The Moon Celebrated at Bonhams In New York."

The Bonhams publicist is Staci Smith and her contact info is at the bottom of the press release.

Dave Scott, not the astronaut
(bestselling author of The New Rules of Marketing & PR
now published in 24 languages)

SRB
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posted 04-12-2010 08:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SRB   Click Here to Email SRB     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Okay folks, the Bonhams sale is tomorrow. So how will it do? Now is the time to go on record with fearless predictions. My crystal ball says the Armstrong quote (lot 1161) will do great but the other high priced Apollo 11 material will all fall short. Likewise the few pieces of later Apollo flown material won't make the estimates.

As for the "flown", now unflown, docking ring (lot 1236) reduced to a mere $30-$50, it isn't going to make the low end. So, that's what I think and tomorrow I'll know. Have fun at the sale.

SRB
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posted 04-13-2010 03:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SRB   Click Here to Email SRB     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'd say that Bonhams had a successful sale. They had more home runs than strike outs.

Some home run sales prices, including commissions: the great Armstrong quote (lot 1161) for $152,000; Collin's very popular flown mission patch for $85,400; a flown Apollo 11 LM G&N page for $30,500; an Apollo 11 data clip used on the surface $21,740, an Apollo 11 surface checklist page with notations $33,550; a well notated flown Apollo 13 page $45,750 and, yes, the unflown large docking ring made the low estimate at $33,550.

The strike outs; several flown Apollo 11 pages didn't sell as well as some Apollo 12 flown equipment.

Overall, these results seem to bode well for the next three space sales in the next eight days.

Greggy_D
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posted 04-13-2010 03:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Greggy_D   Click Here to Email Greggy_D     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is it me, or does Bonhams pull in some relatively high bid amounts compared to the other auction houses out there?

spaced out
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posted 04-14-2010 03:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Some very high prices for those items that sold, but one item struck me as a bargain:

Lot 1238, the Apollo 14 flown Congo flag presentation hand signed by Alan Shepard, which sold for $976 including fees. A lunar flown flag with an unusual history and impeccable provenance, for significantly less than a run-of-the-mill Armstrong WSS ISP.

On the other hand if anyone thinks lot 1144 - a set of Lion Brothers mission patches from Apollo 7 through 17 - was a bargain at $1,098 I'll be happy to sell them an identical set of patches for under a grand - and I'll throw in postage for free!

DSeuss5490
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From: Columbus, Ohio USA
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posted 04-14-2010 07:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DSeuss5490   Click Here to Email DSeuss5490     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As I have written previously in this forum, surprisingly, and certainly contrary to Armstrong's claim, I am aware of another such signed quote residing in a home here in Columbus, Ohio. That one, however, is on a flown Apollo 11 beta cloth and has a lengthy inscription to the recipient in addition to the full quote signed along the edge of the patch. On the back of the frame there is a snapshot of Armstrong presenting the cloth to the man who still owns it (with his writing clearly visible) and the photo also shows NA holding the pen which he used to sign it. Surprisingly, the owner still has this pen and has it attached to the $2 frame that the beta has been in for over 40 years.

All times are CT (US)

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