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  [Discuss] SpaceX Crew Dragon Demo-2 (Page 2)

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] SpaceX Crew Dragon Demo-2
Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-08-2020 01:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AstroCasey:
...it does appear to be a first.
Steve Bowen was the first NASA astronaut to fly on back-to-back missions. He flew on STS-132 in May 2010 and STS-133 in February 2011, replacing Tim Kopra on the latter after Kopra was injured.

AstroCasey
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posted 05-08-2020 01:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AstroCasey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Okay. I remember the STS-132/133 flights now. Thanks for the clarification.

Henry Heatherbank
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posted 05-08-2020 05:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Henry Heatherbank     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Aren't you forgetting Pinky Nelson on STS 61-C and 26? First back to back successful spaceflights, given that the intervening and unsuccessful 51-L did not reach altitude.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-08-2020 05:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Without taking anything away from Nelson, I would not discount a flight on whether it was successful or not. STS-61C and STS-26 were not consecutive.

p51
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posted 05-08-2020 06:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for p51   Click Here to Email p51     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Are there any photographs anywhere of those suits fully pressurized?

They seem to lack the bulk of most other pressure suits. To be honest, they look like something out of a sci-fi movie, made for the comfort of an actor but not very practical or even usable in a real-world environment.

Headshot
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posted 05-08-2020 07:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree, and the helmets don't look much better. Looking at the latching mechanism (or lack thereof) it seems like the visor is held down by two tiny refrigerator magnets on each side of the chin. You can even see two small metal plates on the inside of the visor that might engage the magnets.

It may work, but it certainly doesn't inspire confidence.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-08-2020 07:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I believe this photo (also posted on the preceding page) shows the suit pressurized during a leak check.

328KF
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posted 05-08-2020 08:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One thing I noticed during the countdown demonstration was that the suited astronauts couldn’t, or barely could, turn their heads in those helmets. They looked like alligators trying to look around.

Proper head restraint was cited as a possible improvement in the Columbia accident investigation report, but that could better be accomplished with better seat design without compromising mobility/visibility in the suits during normal ops.

The Boeing suit design seems lacking in this area as well; seat head restraints look far better than the shuttle, but having two large David Clark earphones on either side of the head inside a soft helmet looks pretty painful in an "off nominal" situation.

Headshot
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posted 05-08-2020 09:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boy, you can really tell when the suit is pressurized. The giraffe-neck effect looks like it might be painful.

Of course the point of the suit is to save the astronauts' lives if the Crew Dragon depressurizes.

oly
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posted 05-08-2020 11:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The suit design, as stated above, is to provide crew survivability should the spacecraft suffer a partial of total cabin pressure loss. The system is designed to be automated with crew override if required, which requires movements of the arm and glove.

Building a spacesuit that can achieve flexibility and mobility in space whilst maintaining the suit pressure equal to the ISS cabin pressure is difficult.

quote:
Originally posted by 328KF:
...having two large David Clark earphones on either side of the head inside a soft helmet looks pretty painful in an "off nominal" situation.
Wearing a tight fitting helmet introduces additional problems such as the breaking crew members necks during rapid cabin pressure loss when the suit balloons rapidly, something that the Apollo bubble helmet design avoided and why the snoopy cap evolved.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-12-2020 01:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX has released an online ISS Docking Simulator featuring the same interface as aboard Dragon. Discuss your docking attempts here.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-13-2020 11:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley entered quarantine on Wednesday (May 13), with extra precautions for the coronavirus.
For example, anyone who will come on site or interact with the crew during the quarantine period, as well as any VIPs, will be screened for temperature and symptoms. Hurley and Behnken, as well as those in direct, close contact with the crew will be tested twice for the virus as a precaution.

MSS
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posted 05-13-2020 04:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MSS     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Does back-up crew for DM-2 crew exist or not?

AstroCasey
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posted 05-13-2020 05:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AstroCasey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Michael Hopkins and Victor Glover are the backup crew.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-13-2020 05:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Unless there has been a change I am unaware of, Kjell Lindgren is the Demo-2 backup crew member and is now quarantined with Behnken and Hurley.

Hopkins and Glover (together with Shannon Walker and Soichi Noguchi) are assigned to Crew 1, the first post-certification Dragon mission set to launch after Demo-2.

AstroCasey
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posted 05-13-2020 06:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AstroCasey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Okay. I see now what you are saying about Kjell Lindgren. The source I researched for my earlier post appears to be wrong.

SPACEFACTS
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posted 05-16-2020 02:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SPACEFACTS   Click Here to Email SPACEFACTS     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 328KF:
...NASA has yet to release an official crew portrait
It seems that the official crew portrait is here.
jsc2019e017848 (April 30, 2020) --- NASA astronauts Robert Behnken (left) and Doug Hurley will launch to the International Space Station on the Demo-2 mission – the crew flight test of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon. Credit: SpaceX/Ashish Sharma

LM-12
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posted 05-16-2020 08:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AstroCasey:
Michael Hopkins and Victor Glover are the backup crew.
This NASA caption seems to indicate that.
Group portrait photos of SpaceX Crew Flight Test (Demo-2) crew & backup crews - From left to right: Victor Glover, Mike Hopkins, Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-16-2020 03:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The caption is in error. I contacted JSC PAO to confirm.
Kjell is their backup, but he is not in quarantine with them.
KSC is being made aware of the photo caption error.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-18-2020 08:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Headshot:
How many Falcon 9 launches will be conducted from LC-39A before the Demo-2 mission lifts off?
Demo-2 is now the next Falcon 9 to launch. From SpaceX, via Twitter:
Standing down from the Starlink mission, due to tropical storm Arthur, until after launch of Crew Demo-2.
The off-shore storm was a concern due to the turnaround time needed for the first stage recovery droneship.

Headshot
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posted 05-19-2020 11:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Crew Dragon Demo-2 mission has historic connotations of being the first commercially-built spacecraft to carry Americans into orbit and returning them to Earth. Has any thought been given to the disposition of the Crew Dragon capsule itself after the mission ends? Even though it is the property of SpaceX, might it end up in the Smithsonian?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-19-2020 11:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
At a May 1 press conference, Benji Reed, director of crew mission management for SpaceX, said that the spacecraft is designed to be flown five times and, pending its condition on its return, he expected the Dragon to be serviced and re-flown.

SpaceX's agreement with NASA provides for a new spacecraft for each crewed flight (at least initially) but the company plans to use the same spacecraft (with a different interior configuration) for cargo missions going forward, so the Demo-2 vehicle could return to the space station with supplies.

BA002
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posted 05-19-2020 03:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for BA002   Click Here to Email BA002     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am surprised, with this much riding on the successful outcome of this mission, that apparently just nine days is enough to get the spacecraft mated to and tested with the booster. Didn’t that take months during Apollo?

oly
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posted 05-20-2020 01:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Falcon 9 launch vehicle and Dragon spacecraft system was designed from the start for rapid turn around as part of the system reusability, so it is no surprise that a system capable of expedited mate, test, stage and launch does not need to sit on the launchpad for weeks prior to launch.

SpaceDust
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posted 05-20-2020 09:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceDust     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has anyone seen a detailed launch and/or mission timeline for the Demo-2?

If you have one that you can share would be appreciated. The NASA press kit that leads you to believe it’s for this mission is an updated old press kit for the commercial crew program that has been out for years, and tells one totally nothing about this mission. No real details at all which is a major disappointment. Nothing like the press kits of yesteryears.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-20-2020 10:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The CCP press kit does include a timeline for the launch but the way the site is designed, it is not possible to link directly. Here it is reprinted:
  • -00:45:00 SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for propellant load
  • -00:42:00 Crew access arm retracts
  • -00:37:00 Dragon launch escape system is armed
  • -00:35:00 RP-1 (rocket grade kerosene) loading begins
  • -00:35:00 1st stage LOX (liquid oxygen) loading begins
  • -00:16:00 2nd stage LOX loading begins
  • -00:07:00 Falcon 9 begins engine chill prior to launch
  • -00:05:00 Dragon transitions to internal power
  • -00:01:00 Command flight computer to begin final prelaunch checks
  • -00:01:00 Propellant tank pressurization to flight pressure begins
  • -00:00:45 SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for launch
  • -00:00:03 Engine controller commands engine ignition sequence to start
  • -00:00:00 Falcon 9 liftoff

  • +00:00:58 Max Q (moment of peak mechanical stress on the rocket)
  • +00:02:30 1st stage main engine cutoff (MECO)
  • +00:02:34 1st and 2nd stages separate
  • +00:02:36 2nd stage engine starts
  • +00:07:12 1st stage entry burn
  • +00:08:43 2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO-1)
  • +00:08:45 1st stage entry burn
  • +00:09:09 1st stage landing
  • +00:12:02 Crew Dragon separates from 2nd stage
  • +00:12:48 Dragon nosecone open sequence begins
Assuming a 4:33 p.m. EDT launch on May 27, Dragon will autonomously dock with the International Space Station on May 28, at approximately 11:30 a.m. EDT.

SpaceDust
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posted 05-20-2020 12:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceDust     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Robert, I have this and was looking for one with more depth. When does the crew wake up, don Suit, leave crew quarters, arrive at pad, hatch close, etc.? Looking for something like you could find during shuttle missions. Seems NASA PAO and SpaceX just don't care.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-20-2020 12:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Some of these details are available, but they are being provided directly to the press on request, rather than being published online.

This is SpaceX's flight, so we may not see their "press kit" until a day or two before the launch if they stay consistent with past launches. It is their decision what details to release or not.

Behnken and Hurley will wake up about six hours before the launch. They will suit up two hours later and leave for the pad at about T-3 hours. They begin boarding the Dragon at about two and a half hours before liftoff.

David C
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posted 05-21-2020 09:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I hope next Wednesday’s launch and the rest of the flight goes better than yesterday’s arrival of the crew at KSC did. At one point I thought that N992NA was going to take out the Huey’s windshield.

Dragon is highly automated, but even then, for the first flight of a spacecraft I’d have thought that the possibility of the crew staying up there for four months with I’d guess only glorified laptops to stay current on is a less than ideal prospect.

David C
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posted 05-21-2020 10:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Steve Bowen was the first NASA astronaut to fly on back-to-back missions.
Depends on how you do the counting. There was a guy called Joe Walker who flew something called the X-15. He happened to be employed by NASA but, they didn’t call him an astronaut.

Still, on July 19th 1963 he flew X-15 number 3 to 105.9km altitude, and on 22nd August of the same year he flew the same machine to 107.8km. That's quite high enough to meet any pernickety FAI sporting definition of space. On August 23rd 2005 NASA awarded him civilian astronaut wings posthumously.

Nobody else flew into space between those dates, and there were no other X-15 free flights either. But then the X-15 really has been forgotten.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-21-2020 10:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Invites Public to Be Its Guests to Celebrate Historic 'Launch America'

NASA is inviting the public to help celebrate a historic milestone in human spaceflight as it prepares for #LaunchAmerica – the first flight into orbit of American astronauts on American rockets from American soil since the end of the space shuttle era in 2011.

Known as NASA's SpaceX Demo-2 test flight, which is targeted for lift off at 4:33 p.m. EDT Wednesday, May 27, this mission will send NASA astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley to the International Space Station as part of the agency's Commercial Crew Program. Members of the public can attend the launch virtually, receiving mission updates and opportunities normally received by on-site guests.

"Through NASA's virtual launch experience, we make it possible for more people than ever to watch the beginning of this new era in human spaceflight," said Bettina Inclán, NASA's associate administrator for Communications. "We're already seeing people participate online with the #LaunchAmerica hashtag and helping build the excitement for this historic moment."

To participate, members of the public can register to find a calendar of mission information, mission highlights, and virtual tours.

Demo-2 will be SpaceX's second spaceflight test of its Crew Dragon craft and its first test with astronauts aboard. This final test flight prior to NASA certification and will provide data on the performance of the Falcon 9 rocket, the Crew Dragon and ground systems, as well as in-orbit, docking, and landing operations.

The Falcon 9 rocket will launch from historic Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. But, the excitement will be felt across the country and around the world, with virtual launch parties and other events to help usher in this new era of spaceflight as NASA and its commercial partners take the next bold step toward to send the first woman and the next man to the Moon by 2024 as part of the agency's Artemis program.

Live video coverage and countdown commentary begins at 12:15 p.m. May 27. Watch the launch and all prelaunch activities on NASA TV, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and Linkedin. You also can share reasons you are excited for the launch on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook with the hashtag #LaunchAmerica for a chance to be shared on our social media channels.

But, before then, there are a lot of other ways people can get involved with this historic mission now. The virtual events taking place include:

Virtual NASA Social

For the first time ever, NASA is hosting a global "NASA Social," an opportunity for social media users to get a behind the scenes view of the launch – virtually – and a unique way the public can celebrate the return of human spaceflight to American soil.

The #LaunchAmerica NASA Social is taking the form of a Facebook group that any social media user can request permission to join by answering a few simple questions and agreeing to adhere to the guidelines of the group. In addition to connecting virtually with a community of people excited about the #LaunchAmerica mission, participants will be able to virtually tour NASA facilities at Kennedy and interact with NASA representatives in real time, as well as virtually view a launch of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

NASA STEM Engagement

No matter where you are, you can celebrate this historic milestone with other members of the Artemis Generation. Students can share their excitement with webinars, virtual reality experiences and activities specifically designed for grades K-4 and grades 5-12.

NASA Television Coverage

In addition to social media coverage, NASA Television will air a number of events leading up to, including, and following the historic launch. Continuous coverage of the mission on all NASA TV channels begins at 12:15 p.m. Wednesday, May 27 and continue through Crew Dragon's arrival at the International Space Station on Thursday, May 28, including the subsequent hatch opening and welcoming ceremony.

The following events currently are scheduled to air live (all times Eastern). Please check the NASA TV schedule for the latest updates:

  • Thursday, May 21

    No earlier than 6 p.m. – Demo-2 post-Flight Readiness Review news conference

  • Friday, May 22

    2:15 p.m. – Astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley virtual media question-and-answer session

  • Monday, May 25

    No earlier than 6 p.m. – Demo-2 prelaunch news conference

  • Tuesday, May 26

    10 a.m. – NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine media availability at Kennedy's Countdown Clock

  • Wednesday, May 27

    Noon – Live views of the SpaceX/Falcon 9 rocket on Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center

    12:15 p.m. – Live countdown coverage of NASA's SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station (launch scheduled at 4:33 p.m.)

    6 p.m. – Demo-2 postlaunch news conference

  • Thursday, May 28

    11:39 a.m. – Docking of the SpaceX Crew Dragon and NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station

    1:55 p.m. – SpaceX Crew Dragon hatch opening to the International Space Station

    2:25 p.m. – SpaceX Crew Dragon and International Space Station crew media event aboard the space station

  • Friday, May 29

    11:05 a.m. – International Space Station Expedition 63 crew news conference with space station Commander Chris Cassidy of NASA and NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley

    12:50 p.m. – International Space Station Expedition 63 in-flight event for SpaceX to mark the arrival of the Demo-2 crew

The Demo-2 mission will be the final major step before NASA's Commercial Crew Program certifies Crew Dragon for operational, long-duration missions to the space station. This certification and regular operation of Crew Dragon will enable NASA to continue the important research and technology investigations taking place onboard the station, which benefits people on Earth and lays the groundwork for future exploration of the Moon and Mars starting with the agency's Artemis program.

328KF
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posted 05-21-2020 04:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has anyone heard, in all of these press events, any reporter ask the crew their opinion on the “load and go” procedure in which the vehicle is fueled with them aboard the spacecraft?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-21-2020 04:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, Bob Behnken addressed it during the pre-flight press conference on May 1:
There certainly is a different level of nervousness for both Doug and I — I think nervousness is not the right word. It is a different level of awareness once we get the 'ejection seat,' if you will, armed on the vehicle while it starts the tanking process.

So to sit on that ejection seat for 45 minutes through that tanking operation, leading up to the launch, is something that we are used to doing in airplanes. At some point on the ground, we do need to arm that ejection seat and post-flight we need to do it as well. It is just part of the way we have done business our entire careers, both in the military and now on the SpaceX vehicle.

Again, I wouldn't say we have nervousness or a difference, it is just part of recognizing what capabilities the vehicle has and what can happen to you at any given point. Once we get that system armed up, we will be ready to go fly.

328KF
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posted 05-21-2020 06:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The second part of the reporter's question was specifically in regard to fueling with crew aboard. I heard Behnken's comment about "heightened awareness" to be related to the arming of the escape system, similar to sitting on an armed ejection seat, rather than his offering an opinion on "load and go."

It sounds from that answer as if they have accepted that the abort system will be able to get them away from an explosion during fueling. So while the question was asked, I have yet to see any rationale behind that assumption.

Unfortunately, with the commercial nature of this operation, such information is likely deemed proprietary.

SkyMan1958
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posted 05-21-2020 07:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There was a "news conference" held today between ISS commander Chris Cassidy with three media organizations; Discovery Channel, CBS and the Houston Chronicle. You can see it on YouTube.

It was obvious that Cassidy was friendly with the two Demo-2 astronauts, given some of his comments. One thing I particularly enjoyed was the Discovery Channel spokesperson asked Cassidy if he had anything to say to Hurley and Behnken about their upcoming mission. Cassidy spouted off the normal NASA PR fluff, and then said, "...and don't screw it up," with a little smile on his face. It was amusing to see.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-21-2020 08:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Cassidy succeeded Behnken as chief of the Astronaut Office and he flew with Hurley on STS-127, hence the familiarity (in addition to just being in the astronaut office at the same time).
quote:
Originally posted by 328KF:
I heard Behnken's comment about "heightened awareness" to be related to the arming of the escape system...
I think that was his intention, but in the context that the abort system is activated when it is because of the vehicle being fueled. As such, if anything were to go wrong during tanking, then both he and Hurley would be safe, having the ability to perform a pad abort if needed.

Delta7
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posted 05-21-2020 08:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When Behnken arrives aboard the ISS this will mark the first time that 2 former Astronaut Office Chiefs have flown together. Al Shepard would be impressed I'm sure.

oly
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posted 05-22-2020 12:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The load and go system is a design that was evaluated and accepted by both the SpaceX and NASA teams, it exists for performance reasons, and all steps that mitigate risks have been tested, reviewed, and deemed appropriate.

The crews fully understand the risks involve and have compared them to what they reference as their normal, working on and around fully armed aircraft ejection systems, something they understand, train, and remain conscious of.

There are associated risks with fueling the system before and after crew ingress, the load and go reduces the number of people in proximity of a fully fueled rocket and allows for a greater mass of fuel to be loaded. Tanking or topping up the contents of liquid fuel tanks while it sits on the pad with crew strapped in has the same risk factor as fully fuelling the vehicle, there are always risks of couplings failing to disconnect or seal, line or tank rupture, and catastrophic failure.

Perhaps people do not agree with the SpaceX design because it differs from the way things have been done previously, but that very point is why SpaceX is in the position they are.

Consider what design changes would be needed to make the Falcon 9 design perform the same way previous designs have performed and then consider why the previous designs are not being used for the next launch. There is not another system capable of conducting reusable crewed launch to the ISS and back online today. SpaceX should be applauded for their design and effort, their ideation and innovation of designs has been an interesting journey so far.

I am excited for next week's launch and the milestone it represents.

Skylon
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posted 05-22-2020 08:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Skylon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Delta7:
When Behnken arrives aboard the ISS this will mark the first time that 2 former Astronaut Office Chiefs have flown together.
Wouldn't ASTP count as the first time for that? Deke Slayton and Tom Stafford.

Delta7
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posted 05-22-2020 12:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You're right. Even though Slayton's actual title was Coordinator of Astronaut Activities, he was the Chief Astronaut.


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Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





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