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  Boeing CST-100 Starliner crewed spacecraft (Page 2)

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Author Topic:   Boeing CST-100 Starliner crewed spacecraft
Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 38568
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-01-2016 08:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Aeroject Rocketdyne release
Aerojet Rocketdyne Successfully Completes Launch Abort Engine Hot Fire Tests to Support Next Era of Human Spaceflight Launches from the United States

Aerojet Rocketdyne, a subsidiary of Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings, Inc. (NYSE:AJRD), has successfully completed a series of hot-fire tests on two Launch Abort Engines (LAE) featuring innovative new propellant valves for Boeing's Crew Space Transportation (CST)-100 Starliner service module propulsion system. The tests were conducted in the Mojave Desert in California, and confirmed the ability for the new valves to modulate propellant flow and control peak LAE thrust in the event of a launch abort.

The LAEs, designed by Aerojet Rocketdyne, include a fuel valve and oxidizer valve, which were developed and tested under the company's Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) subcontract to Boeing. The Starliner will open a new era of spaceflight, carrying humans to the International Space Station once again from United States soil.

The LAEs, designed by Aerojet Rocketdyne, include a fuel valve and oxidizer valve, which were developed and tested under the company's Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) subcontract to Boeing. The Starliner will open a new era of spaceflight, carrying humans to the International Space Station once again from United States soil.

"These innovative valves successfully enabled the engine to demonstrate precise timing, peak thrust control and steady-state thrust necessary during a mission abort. This testing culminates a year of dedicated hard work by the LAE Integrated Product Team at Aerojet Rocketdyne," said Aerojet Rocketdyne CEO and President Eileen Drake. "This is another important step forward as our nation prepares to safely and reliably send humans back to the space station from American soil."

Under the CCtCap subcontract to Boeing, Aerojet Rocketdyne will provide propulsion system hardware, which includes LAEs, Orbital Maneuvering and Attitude Control (OMAC) thrusters, Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters, and more. Boeing will assemble propulsion hardware kits into the service module section of the Starliner spacecraft at its Commercial Crew and Cargo Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Aerojet Rocketdyne also provides hardware supporting service module hot-fire testing, which will take place at NASA's White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico; the pad abort and system qualification testing, which will occur at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico; and the orbital flight test, which will be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

The Starliner service module propulsion system provides launch abort capability on the pad and during ascent, along with propulsion needs during flight - from launch vehicle separation, docking to and undocking from the space station, to separation of the crew and service modules when the spacecraft begins to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. At separation, crew module monopropellant thrusters, also provided by Aerojet Rocketdyne, support re-entry control.

The Starliner service module and launch abort propulsion system is designed to rapidly "push" a crew capsule to safety if an abort is necessary. If unused for an abort, the propellant is used to complete the spacecraft's mission operations. The Starliner service module propulsion system includes four 40,000-pound thrust launch abort engines used only in an abort; 1,500-pound thrust class OMAC thrusters that provide low-altitude launch abort attitude control; maneuvering and stage-separation functions along with high-altitude direct abort capability and large orbital maneuvers; and 100-pound thrust class RCS engines that provide high-altitude abort attitude control, on-orbit low delta-v maneuvering and space station re-boost capability.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 38568
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-20-2017 04:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boeing photo release
Boeing's CST-100 Starliner Structural Test Article has arrived at the company's Huntington Beach, California, facilities for evaluations.

Built to the specifications of an operational spacecraft, the STA is intended to be put through a series of thorough testing conditions.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 38568
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-10-2017 04:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
Campaign Tests Parachutes Designed to Provide Astronauts a Soft Landing

A flight-sized boilerplate of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner touched down gently under parachutes against the backdrop of the San Andres Mountains in late February, providing a preview of how the spacecraft will return to Earth in upcoming NASA missions. Boeing is developing the Starliner to take astronauts to and from the International Space Station in partnership with NASA's Commercial Crew Program.

Above: A high-altitude balloon lifts off in White Sands, New Mexico, carrying a boilerplate of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner to perform a drop test of the spacecraft's parachute system. Credit: Boeing

The parachute test is one in a series that will allow the vehicle to pick up the same velocity as the actual spacecraft when returning to Earth in the southwest region of the United States from the International Space Station. The goal of the test series is to prove the design of the Starliner's parachutes.

"Completion of this test campaign will bring Boeing and NASA one step closer to launching astronauts on an American vehicle and bringing them home safely," said Mark Biesack, spacecraft systems lead for the agency's Commercial Crew Program.

The test began at the Spaceport America facility near the Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. During the test, the Starliner was lifted about 40,000 feet in the air, the flying altitude of a typical commercial airline flight, by a Near Space Corp. helium balloon and then released over the White Sands Missile Range.

Above: Seen from the top hatch of the Starliner boilerplate, parachutes deploy as planned to land the boilerplate safely during a test of the parachute system. Credit: Boeing

Given the flight-like characteristics and the large size of the capsule, Boeing was not able to fit the Starliner test article into the hold of a C-130 or C-17 aircraft. Their solution, a 1.3-million-cubic-foot balloon, which is able to lift the capsule to its intended altitude.

"This parachute test, as well as the subsequent tests in Boeing's qualification test campaign, provides valuable data, because the test article has the same mass, outer mold line, and center of gravity as the flight vehicle," said Biesack. "The high-fidelity data they receive from these tests will anchor predicted models of realistic parachute deployment."

Attached underneath the Starliner boilerplate was a large, yellow stabilization weight used to orient the test vehicle's angle of attack and speed of descent. As the Starliner descended to the desert at speeds of 300 miles per hour, a series of dynamic events slowed the spacecraft. Shortly after the Starliner was released from the balloon, the spacecraft deployed two drogue parachutes at 28,000 feet to stabilize the spacecraft, then its pilot parachutes at 12,000 feet. The main parachutes followed at 8,000 feet above the ground prior to the jettison of the spacecraft's base heat shield at 4,500 feet. Finally, the spacecraft touched the ground lightly, kicking up the desert sand.

During missions to the station, the Starliner will be equipped with large air bags that will cushion the impact during landing. The Boeing design calls for the spacecraft to be reused up to ten times, and a land-landing will aid with reusability. In the event of an emergency, the spacecraft also can splash down in the ocean.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 38568
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-05-2017 02:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boeing release
All Systems Are Go! Boeing's CST-100 Starliner Spacecraft Powers On for the First Time

Earlier this month, test engineers hit the power-on switch on Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft. For the first time this activated the spacecraft's complete flight avionics system as it would be used by astronauts for all functions like maneuvering the spacecraft, rendezvous, docking, undocking and communicating with the International Space Station and mission control back here on Earth.

Throughout this power-on phase, engineers in the Commercial Crew and Cargo Processing Facility (C3PF) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center will be testing the Starliner's complicated cable routing, which must remain secure in harsh environments including launch, landing and zero-gravity flight. Engineers will ensure that computers can communicate with each other between the upper and lower sections of the spacecraft before they are mated together later this year. While this spacecraft isn't lined up to fly to space, it will be used for ground testing in the C3PF before going on to White Sands, New Mexico, for a Pad Abort Test early next year.

Stay tuned for more milestones leading up to the spacecraft's first crew flight test to the International Space Station in 2018.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 38568
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-25-2017 06:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
BeyondEarth.com (Boeing) video release
Sticking the Landing: Starliner Seat Drop Test Success

Recent CST-100 Starliner testing proved the spacecraft will come to a safe stop when it lands on land.

Testing to the extreme using test dummies, seat drop tests proved the systems will effectively cushion the passenger’s head, neck and spine upon landing. Engineers performed 30 drop tests from various heights and seat orientations. Parachutes and an airbag system will initially slow Starliner when it re-enters Earth’s atmosphere. Starliner is being developed in partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. It will take astronauts and cargo to and from the International Space Station. The first launch is slated for next year.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 38568
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-03-2017 01:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boeing release
Ground control to major console: Mesa completes space dashboard

When two test pilot astronauts head into space aboard Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft, they won't just be looking out the windows to catch an array of breathtaking views.

It will be all business as they focus on the data coming off a console originally imagined and designed by a team in Houston, and later refined and built by a small team in Mesa, Ariz. The dashboard of displays, instruments and controls will be within arm's reach of the spacecraft's commander and pilot, much like the flight deck of a 747 aircraft or the cockpit in an Apache helicopter.

Operating on a rigorous timeline and working through challenges unique to human spaceflight, members of Mesa's Metals Center of Excellence, Electrical Center of Excellence and engineering organization came together to complete the design and manufacture in just less than a year. This innovation shows the power of pulling ingenuity from across the Boeing network.

The Mesa team also built a console that is hooked up to the Florida Systems Integration Lab, where engineers are running through mission simulations and testing flight software. Building will begin soon on the third and final console for the spacecraft that is slated to fly the uncrewed orbital demonstration mission before it turns around for multiple NASA missions to the space station.

Starliner's first crew flight test to the International Space Station in 2018 will be Boeing's first commercial flight transporting humans to space.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 38568
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-04-2018 09:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
United Launch Alliance (ULA) release
United Launch Alliance Completes Key Milestone for Launch of Boeing's Starliner and Return of U.S.-based Human Spaceflight

United Launch Alliance (ULA) successfully completed an Atlas V Launch Segment Design Certification Review (DCR) recently in preparation for the launch of astronauts to the International Space Station from U.S. soil in The Boeing Company's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft. ULA's Atlas V DCR supported the Boeing International Space Station (ISS) DCR that was held with NASA at Kennedy Space Center in early December.

"Design Certification Review is a significant milestone that completes the design phase of the program, paving the way to operations," said Barb Egan, ULA Commercial Crew program manager. "Hardware and software final qualification tests are underway, as well as a major integrated test series, including structural loads. Future tests will involve launch vehicle hardware, such as jettison tests, acoustic tests, and, finally, a pad abort test in White Sands, New Mexico."

Launch vehicle production is currently on track for an uncrewed August 2018 Orbital Flight Test (OFT). The OFT booster for the uncrewed flight is in final assembly at the factory in Decatur, Ala., and the OFT Centaur upper stage has completed pressure testing. Other hardware such as the launch vehicle adapter and aeroskirt production are on schedule to support test articles and flight.

"ULA is progressing into the operational phase to launch the OFT and Crew Flight Test in 2018, and we are pleased with the progress we're making toward a successful launch of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner on the Atlas V," said Gary Wentz, ULA Human and Commercial Systems vice president. "We cannot overstate the importance of all the steps that go into this process as there is more than just a mission or hardware at stake, but the lives of our brave astronauts."

The Boeing Company selected ULA's Atlas V rocket for human-rated spaceflight to the ISS. ULA's Atlas V has launched more than 70 times with a 100 percent mission success rate.

See here to discuss Boeing's efforts to develop the CST-100 Starliner.


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