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  James Webb Space Telescope: comments

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Author Topic:   James Webb Space Telescope: comments
Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 04-23-2015 04:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
James Webb Space Telescope: questions and comments
This thread is intended for comments and questions about the James Webb Space Telescope and the updates published under this topic.

The JWST is NASA's next orbiting observatory and the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. A tennis court-sized telescope orbiting far beyond Earth's moon, Webb will detect infrared radiation and be capable of seeing in that wavelength as well as Hubble sees in visible light.

Blackarrow
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From: Belfast, United Kingdom
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posted 04-23-2015 04:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Several years ago, Bruce McCandless told me that the James Webb Space Telescope was going to be fitted with a grappling point on the off-chance that a future astronaut crew might visit to carry out repairs. Is that still the case?

Will the JWST have a shuttle-type grapple-point? Would it be possible to send an Orion crew to fix JWST if it breaks down? (I do realise Orion doesn't have an "arm" but designing some sort of "grapple hook" would surely be simple compared with committing to a repair flight.)

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-23-2015 05:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There are no plans for Orion (or any other vehicle, crewed or robotic) to visit JWST, and none of the telescope's instruments can be serviced on orbit.

In 2007 however, NASA announced it would add a docking ring "just in case" something truly horrific (and obvious) were to go wrong with the observatory's deployment that astronauts might be able to help fix it. But as far as I can see, the only mention of such an adapter dates back to that original news eight years ago and since then, there has been no official confirmation that the docking ring was ever added.

BetaCanum
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From: Lafayette, CA USA
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posted 04-24-2015 11:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for BetaCanum   Click Here to Email BetaCanum     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Probably better to save the weight and just know that you could build a jig down the road to capture it if necessary, ala Intelsat 6.

Cozmosis22
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posted 04-24-2015 12:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cozmosis22     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Since this observatory will be placed more than a quarter of a million miles from Earth it is highly unlikely that there will be any crewed servicing mission. Also, a robotic mission would be too expensive and probably too complicated to be feasible. The JWST must work properly once orbited or it will become space junk.

Jim Behling
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posted 04-24-2015 12:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Its really not viable for JWST repairs to be supported by Orion. In the deployed configuration, JWST is a delicate and contamination sensitive spacecraft. Orion's RCS thrusters would greatly affect the sunshield and would deposit exhaust on the unenclosed mirrors.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 01-14-2017 11:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The U.S. Departments of Commerce and State have removed the James Webb Space Telescope from the U.S. Munitions List (USML), freeing it from International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), as part of a larger set of tweaks to the space export controls.
The revised rule makes several other minor changes to technologies included on export control lists. It also shifts NASA's James Webb Space Telescope from the USML to the Commerce Control List, after the State Department concluded that the space observatory "was within the scope of spacecraft and related items that did not warrant being subject to the ITAR." JWST will require an export license as it will be shipped to French Guiana in 2018 for launch on an Ariane 5.
The Commerce Control List is a less restrictive export control system administered by the Commerce Department.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 05-30-2017 07:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA's "Webb-cam" Captures Engineers at Work on Webb at Johnson Space Center

NASA's special "Webb-cam" kept an eye on the development of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, since 2012. Now that Webb telescope has moved to NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, a special Webb camera was installed there to continue providing daily video feeds on the telescope's progress.

Space enthusiasts, who are fascinated to see how this next generation space telescope has come together and how it is being tested, are able to see the telescope's progress as it happens by watching the Webb-cam feed online.

There were two Webb-cams at NASA Goddard. Those cameras, which were mounted inside the giant cleanroom, provided still photos (refreshed every minute) of the activity inside and gave a peek at what engineers and technicians were doing to the telescope as it came together. Over the last five years, Webb-cam viewers saw some amazing images of the Webb at Goddard, such as when all 18 gold-coated mirror segments of the Webb's primary mirror were mounted on the telescope.

"The two Webb-cams we installed in Goddard's giant cleanroom have developed a huge following over the last five years," said Maggie Masetti, social media manager and web developer on the Webb telescope mission at NASA Goddard. "With millions of views every month, you can bet that if there was a camera glitch, we heard about it right away."

The new "Webb-cam" is mounted where it has a view of the cleanroom at NASA Johnson Space Center. The camera fronts the chamber where the Webb telescope will be undergoing cryogenic testing in a massive chamber called "Chamber A." Although there is no view of Webb once it is inside the chamber during the actual cryo-optical testing, there will be much activity on Webb in the cleanroom itself for several weeks before and after.

The Web camera at NASA's Johnson Space Center can be seen online here, with larger views of the cams available here.

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