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  [Discuss] James Webb Space Telescope (Page 2)

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] James Webb Space Telescope
Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-12-2021 08:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The people responsible for the James Webb Space Telescope's safety are now thinking about pirates.
Later this year, the telescope will travel by ship to a launch site in South America, passing through the Panama Canal to reach French Guiana. Webb, with a mirror as tall as a two-story building and a protective shield the size of a tennis court, is too large for a plane. Its departure date will be kept secret, someone said at the meeting, to protect against pirates who might want to capture the precious cargo and hold it for ransom. Christopher Conselice, an astrophysicist at the University of Manchester who attended the meeting, was at first baffled by the concern because, well, pirates, but it quickly clicked.

"Why would you announce that you're going to be shipping on a certain day something that is worth over $10 billion," he explained to me, "that you could easily put in a boat" and sail away with?

GACspaceguy
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posted 03-12-2021 10:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I guess you have to ask yourself, who would they sell it to and what they would do with it if stolen? It is not like you can secretly launch it and do clandestine astronomy with it.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-12-2021 11:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Beyond just harvesting the gold content, one could imagine a ransom request.

Overall, an unlikely scenario, but just real enough to warrant taking precautions (similar to how the Smithsonian did not disclose the route or time that the Apollo 11 command module would be on the road during the "Destination Moon" tour).

GACspaceguy
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posted 03-12-2021 03:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Never really thought about the gold content, good point.

SkyMan1958
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posted 03-12-2021 04:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You wouldn't even need to steal it. Any terrorist organization that hijacks the freighter the JWST is traveling on would get lots of publicity.

After all, they could just hang bedsheets with propaganda over the railings of the boat, and there would be lots of pictures of the boat then posted on all sorts of media sites.

SpaceAholic
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posted 06-05-2021 10:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
American and European officials acknowledged June 1 that the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope will likely slip from the end of October to at least mid-November because of delays linked to the Ariane 5.
The Ariane 5 is scheduled to make its next launch, the first since the August 2020 launch that had the payload fairing anomaly, in the second half of July, said Beatriz Romero, JWST project manager at Arianespace. That launch will be the first of two commercial Ariane 5 launches before the JWST launch.

At a May 11 media event, Greg Robinson, program director for JWST at NASA Headquarters, said that the JWST launch would take place about four months after the first of the two commercial Ariane 5 launches ahead of it. That would push the launch, currently scheduled for no earlier than Oct. 31, to at least the middle of November.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-22-2021 02:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The James Webb Space Telescope will launch no earlier than Dec. 22, 2021. The delay, from Dec. 18, is to allow for additional testing after a recent incident that occurred during Webb's launch preparations.
The incident occurred during operations at the satellite preparation facility in Kourou, French Guiana, performed under Arianespace overall responsibility. Technicians were preparing to attach Webb to the launch vehicle adapter, which is used to integrate the observatory with the upper stage of the Ariane 5 rocket. A sudden, unplanned release of a clamp band – which secures Webb to the launch vehicle adapter – caused a vibration throughout the observatory.

A NASA-led anomaly review board was immediately convened to investigate and instituted additional testing to determine with certainty the incident did not damage any components. NASA and its mission partners will provide an update when the testing is completed at the end of this week.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-14-2021 06:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The James Webb Space Telescope will launch no earlier than Dec. 24, 2021.
The James Webb Space Telescope team is working a communication issue between the observatory and the launch vehicle system.
NASA will provide more information about the new launch date by Friday (Dec. 17).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-18-2021 12:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Sets Coverage, Invites Public to View Webb Telescope Launch

NASA will provide coverage of prelaunch, launch, and postlaunch activities for the James Webb Space Telescope, the world's largest and most powerful space science telescope.

Webb is targeted to launch at 7:20 a.m. EST Friday, Dec. 24, on an Arianespace Ariane 5 rocket from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, on the northeastern coast of South America.

Live launch coverage in English will begin at 6 a.m. on NASA TV, the NASA app, and the agency's website. The public can also watch live on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Twitch, and Daily Motion. NASA also will offer a launch broadcast in Spanish beginning at 6:30 a.m. on the agency's website and Spanish-language social media accounts. NASA will hold a prelaunch media briefing at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 21, and a postlaunch news conference approximately 30 minutes after the live launch broadcast ends on Friday, Dec. 24.

The Webb mission, an international partnership with ESA (European Space Agency) and the Canadian Space Agency, will explore every phase of cosmic history – from within the solar system to the most distant observable galaxies in the early universe, and everything in between. Webb will reveal new and unexpected discoveries and help humanity understand the origins of the universe and our place in it.

Full mission coverage is as follows. All times are Eastern, and information is subject to change.

NASA Press Briefings

At 2 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 21, NASA will hold a virtual prelaunch media briefing with the following participants:

  • NASA Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy
  • Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters in Washington
  • Greg Robinson, Webb program director, NASA Headquarters
  • Beatriz Romero, Webb project director for launch services, Arianespace in Paris
On Friday, Dec. 24, approximately 30 minutes after Webb's launch broadcast ends, a joint news conference will take place in Kourou.

Both briefings will stream on NASA TV, the NASA app, and the agency's website.

NASA TV Launch Coverage in English

NASA TV live coverage will begin at 6 a.m. Friday, Dec. 24. For NASA TV downlink information, schedules, and links to streaming video, visit here.

NASA Launch Coverage in English

Launch day coverage will be available on the agency's website. Coverage will include livestreaming and blog updates. On-demand streaming video and photos of the launch will be available shortly after liftoff. Follow coverage online here.

NASA Launch Coverage in Spanish: Desplegando el Universo

Hosted by Begoña Vila, Webb instrument systems engineer, NASA's broadcast of the launch in Spanish will include interviews with Hispanic members of the mission and live commentary from Kourou by Vila and ESA engineer Julio Monreal.

The show, which will begin at 6:30 a.m. Friday, Dec. 24, will be available on NASA en español's YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook accounts, as well as on NASA's website.

The agency has also released the first episode of NASA's Curious Universe podcast in Spanish. The episode, "Desplegando el universo con el telescopio espacial James Webb," is available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and SoundCloud.

Public Participation

Members of the public can register to attend launch virtually. NASA's virtual guest program for the mission includes curated launch resources, notifications about related opportunities or changes, and a stamp for the NASA virtual guest passport following a successful launch.

Virtual NASA Social

As NASA prepares for Webb to #UnfoldTheUniverse, the agency invites the public to join the James Webb Space Telescope social event on Facebook. Participants will be joined by NASA, ESA, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Space Telescope Science Institute. Stay up to date on the latest mission activities, interact with Webb experts in real-time, and watch the live launch broadcast with an interactive chat.

Watch and Engage on Social Media

Stay connected with the mission and let people know you are following the launch on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram with #UnfoldTheUniverse. Follow and tag these accounts:

  • Twitter: @NASA, @NASAWebb
  • Facebook: NASA, NASAWebb
  • Instagram: NASA, @NASAWebb

ejectr
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posted 12-18-2021 12:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
God speed, J.W.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-21-2021 03:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Although a launch readiness review cleared the vehicle for a Dec. 24 launch attempt, the weather forecast was calling for unacceptable conditions and so the launch as postponed to Christmas Day.

The new targeted launch date is Dec. 25, as early as possible within the launch window of 7:20 a.m. and 7:52 a.m. EST (1220 to 1252 GMT).

lspooz
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posted 12-22-2021 01:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lspooz   Click Here to Email lspooz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ugh, while a Christmas Miracle would be welcome, the weather forecast for Kourou French Guiana every day for the next two weeks is remarkably similar:

Thunderstorms (60-85% chance).

The only difference between days is the decreasing chance of storms after December 30.

"Patience, young Jedi."

ejectr
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posted 12-23-2021 04:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The James Webb Space Telescope, mounted atop the Ariane 5 rocket it will ride into space, has arrived at its final location on Earth: the Arianespace ELA-3 launch complex at Europe’s Spaceport located near Kourou, French Guiana.
Must feel like giving the keys to your Caddie to your 16 year old son.

SpaceAngel
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posted 12-24-2021 05:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What's going to become of Hubble after its successor, JWST, is launched?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-24-2021 09:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hubble will continue in operation until its critical instruments cease functioning. (There has been talk about the potential for another servicing mission, robotic or otherwise, but no real plans exist for that as of today.)

Webb, though more powerful than Hubble, is not really Hubble's successor. The two instruments work in different spectrums. The recently completed decadal study recommended a true successor to Hubble, the Large UV/Optical/IR Surveyor (LUVOIR), which would restore a large optical spectrum telescope to orbital use.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-24-2021 10:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA live video
Watch the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope — the most powerful space telescope ever made. This mission is scheduled to lift off at 7:20 a.m. EST (12:20 UTC), Dec. 25, 2021, aboard an Ariane 5 rocket from Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana.

Live coverage of the launch begins at 6 a.m. EST (11:20 UTC).

David C
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posted 12-25-2021 06:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Go Webb!

Thank you Arianespace, great Christmas present to the world.

dom
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posted 12-25-2021 06:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks ESA, just glad we did our part of the job...

ejectr
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posted 12-25-2021 10:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A new Christmas star exists in our world. A great day to start a journey of new discoveries.

SkyMan1958
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posted 12-25-2021 07:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good luck and Godspeed JWST!!!!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-25-2021 08:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The first and most critical of the three mid-course correction burns is complete.
You can track where Webb is in the process and read about upcoming deployments.

NASA has a detailed plan to deploy the Webb Space Telescope over a roughly two-week period. The deployment process is not an automatic hands-off sequence; it is human-controlled. The team monitors Webb in real-time and may pause the nominal deployment at any time. This means that the deployments may not occur exactly in the order or at the times originally planned.

Mike Dixon
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posted 12-25-2021 08:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Dixon   Click Here to Email Mike Dixon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hope it can take a selfie

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-27-2021 02:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Unfortunately, Webb has no engineering or self-facing cameras on board, and so there will be no views of the deployed telescope at Lagrange Point 2 (L2).

It also means we won't seen the purple (or pink) tint of its sunshield. I have seen some questions about the color on other sites, so adding the explanation (from here):

Webb deploys a tennis-court sized Sunshield made of five thin layers of Kapton E with aluminum and doped-silicon coatings to reflect the sun's heat back into space. The Kapton is a commercially available polyimide film from Dupont, while the coatings are applied to a specialized Webb specification.

Each layer is coated with aluminum, and the sun-facing side of the two hottest layers (designated Layer 1 and Layer 2) also have a "doped-silicon" (or treated silicon) coating to reflect the sun's heat back into space. The sunshield is a critical part of the Webb telescope because the infrared cameras and instruments aboard must be kept very cold and out of the sun's heat and light to function properly.

Kapton is a polyimide film that was developed by DuPont in the late 1960s. It has high heat-resistance and remains stable across a wide range of temperatures from minus 269 to plus 400 Celsius (minus 452 to plus 752 degrees Fahrenheit). It does not melt or burn at the highest of these temperatures. On Earth, Kapton polyimide film can be used in a variety of electrical and electronic insulation applications.

The sunshield layers are also coated with aluminum and doped-silicon for their optical properties and longevity in the space environment. Doping is a process where a small amount of another material is mixed in during the Silicon coating process so that the coating is electrically conductive. The coating needs to be electrically conductive so that the Membranes can be electrically grounded to the rest of JWST and will not build up a static electric charge across their surface. Silicon has a high emissivity, which means it emits the most heat and light and acts to block the sun's heat from reaching the infrared instruments that will be located underneath it. The highly-reflective aluminum surfaces also bounce the remaining energy out of the gaps at the sunshield layer's edges.

The pink hue of the lower side of the sunshield is due to the coating.

SkyMan1958
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posted 12-27-2021 03:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I wonder if the HST could take a picture of the JWST that would show the details of the JWST.

Hmmm, now that I think about it, even if this was possible, the only thing that would show would be the back of the solar protective shades. C'est la vie.

NukeGuy
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posted 12-27-2021 03:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NukeGuy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There’s another historical error in "From the Earth to the Moon." In the episode "Spider," one of the Grumman engineers is proposing Kapton as a lighter weight alternative to thermal shields. Yet the scene appears to take place around 1963-64 not the late 1960s.

On the other hand, the adaptor section of the Gemini spacecraft had a foil-like insulation material visible during photos from the Gemini 6/7 missions. If that was Kapton, then maybe it was developed in the mid-1960s.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-27-2021 05:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Gemini Familiarization Manual describes the adaptor section covering as "an aluminum foil." Though the Kapton on the Apollo spacecraft served a similar purpose, it was stronger and held up to temperature changes better than aluminum.

jklier
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posted 12-27-2021 05:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jklier   Click Here to Email jklier     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SkyMan1958:
I wonder if the HST could take a picture of the JWST that would show the details of the JWST.
I would say no. As I recall the resolution of the Hubble wasn't great enough to resolve an Apollo landing site. With L2 being four times that distance resolving something the size of the JWST would not be possible.

SpaceAngel
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posted 12-28-2021 07:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAngel   Click Here to Email SpaceAngel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's another question: if the space shuttle was not retired, would it have deployed the JWST, somewhat similar to STS-31?

Mike Dixon
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posted 12-29-2021 06:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Dixon   Click Here to Email Mike Dixon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Encouraging to note that depletion of the onboard fuels has been lower than anticipated in the two mid course corrections, thereby extending the telescope's life to over a decade.
NASA's Webb team analyzed the JWST's initial trajectory after its launch atop an Ariane 5 rocket from ESA's Centre Spatial Guyanais in French Guiana. They found that the Ariane 5 did its job better than expected and the course corrections required less fuel than was originally estimated.

As a result, the main engines and the eight smaller attitude thrusters of the spacecraft have a larger remaining supply of the 43 gal (159 l) of hydrazine fuel and 21 gal (79.5 l) of dinitrogen tetroxide oxidizer originally loaded aboard. Rocket fuel is the biggest limiting factor of a craft's lifespan. Because it's needed for station keeping and attitude control, the more there is means the longer a mission can be.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-29-2021 06:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SpaceAngel:
...somewhat similar to STS-31?
Likely not. Though the Webb's folded up dimensions (53 feet tall by 15 feet wide) might be able to fit inside the orbiter's payload bay (60 feet by 15 feet), Webb would require an additional propulsion stage to boost it out of Earth orbit and toward L2.

With only 7 feet to spare, it would not fit. (As a point of comparison, the Inertial Upper Stage used to boost the Chandra X-Ray Observatory after it was deployed from the space shuttle was 17 feet long.)

Jim Behling
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posted 12-30-2021 11:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JWST was originally designed for Delta IV Heavy and moved to Ariane 5 (2002) long before the shuttle retired.

And by going to Ariane 5, the fairing is a little wider than Delta IV and JWST took advantage of that. So, it is a little wider than 15 feet in places.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-30-2021 02:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The European Space Agency (ESA) cleaned up the video of Webb's separation from the Ariane 5 and set it to music:

oly
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posted 12-30-2021 06:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here are two images of the Ariane 5 second stage venting gas after the release of the JWST.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-01-2022 04:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA paused the deployment to give the team New Year's Day off.
Webb mission management decided this morning to pause deployment activities for today and allow the team to rest and prepare to begin Webb's sunshield tensioning tomorrow, Sunday, Jan. 2. That deployment is still expected to take place over at least two days.

This will likely affect the full timeline for Webb’s deployment. The timeline will be updated as major deployments resume.

davidcwagner
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posted 01-02-2022 08:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for davidcwagner   Click Here to Email davidcwagner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Informative 3D video of Webb trajectory. It follows a very odd spacetime curve. Anyone have other trajectory examples?

Jim Behling
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posted 01-04-2022 07:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It depends on your point of reference. It is orbiting the L2 point, but when combined with the orbit of the sun, it is looks like a sine wave.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-04-2022 10:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA live video
James Webb Space Telescope experts give real-time updates in the final stages of the telescope’s sunshield deployment.

Headshot
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posted 01-04-2022 04:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has NASA published a new, revised schedule for deploying the:
  1. Secondary Mirror structure
  2. The Science experiment radiator
  3. The Port Primary Mirror Wing
  4. The Starboard Primary Mirror Wing

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-04-2022 05:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Secondary mirror deployment will begin on Wednesday (Jan. 5).

If everything continues smoothly, then all structural deployments will be completed by Monday (Jan. 10).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-05-2022 10:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA live video
James Webb Space Telescope experts give real-time updates on deployment of the telescope’s secondary mirror. The secondary mirror is one of the most important pieces of equipment on the telescope, and is essential to the success of the mission.

When deployed, this mirror will sit out in front of Webb's hexagonal primary mirrors, which form an iconic honeycomb-like shape. This smaller circular mirror serves an important role in collecting light from Webb’s 18 primary mirrors into a focused beam. That beam is then sent down into the tertiary and fine steering mirrors, and finally to Webb's four powerful scientific instruments.


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