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  JAXA's Hayabusa to explore asteroid Itokawa (Page 3)

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Author Topic:   JAXA's Hayabusa to explore asteroid Itokawa
Jay Chladek
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Posts: 2238
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 06-14-2010 11:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
WOW!!! Nice work! And it looks like I'll be adding the Aoshima kit to my collection now, given Japan's success with this mission.

issman1
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Posts: 894
From: UK
Registered: Apr 2005

posted 06-14-2010 12:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My hat's off to Japan And such a haunting image of planet Earth.

Blackarrow
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Posts: 2101
From: Belfast, United Kingdom
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 06-14-2010 05:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would like to add my congratulations to all involved in this wonderful achievement. Truly inspiring - the re-entry film is really poignant, with the very visible end of the "mother-ship's" mission and the safe return of her offspring.

dss65
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Posts: 837
From: Sandpoint, ID, USA
Registered: Mar 2003

posted 06-14-2010 09:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dss65   Click Here to Email dss65     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bravo!

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27979
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-17-2010 12:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Hayabusa's capsule sample container. Credit: JAXA

Scott
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: May 2001

posted 06-17-2010 08:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott   Click Here to Email Scott     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Am I correct to assume that the dark specks are asteroid material? This is amazing.

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27979
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-17-2010 08:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Scott:
Am I correct to assume that the dark specks are asteroid material?
No, the capsule is still sealed. What you are seeing is the bottom of the sample container. It won't be opened or inspected for asteroid material until it is back in Japan.

Scott
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Posts: 3294
From: Houston, TX
Registered: May 2001

posted 06-17-2010 08:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott   Click Here to Email Scott     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Robert. Hopefully it picked up at least some material.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27979
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-21-2010 11:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA release (June 18, 2010)
Hayabusa Capsule Arrived at JAXA Sagamihara Campus

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has completed the transportation of the Hayabusa capsule and its heat shields from Australia to the curation center in JAXA Sagamihara Campus at 2:15 a.m. on June 18th, 2010 (JST).

ilbasso
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From: Greensboro, NC USA
Registered: Feb 2006

posted 06-21-2010 01:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Latest news on the JAXA website appears to indicate that they X-rayed the sample return container. It should have detected grains larger than 1mm, but none were seen. Also, it was confirmed that the sampling pellet did not fire. However, there is still hope that a few small particles were picked up when Hayabusa touched down on Itokawa.

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27979
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-30-2010 08:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA release
On the Schedule of Opening the Sample Container

We announce that we will start opening the sample container of Hayabusa on June 24, 2010 (Japan Standard Time) in the curation center at the JAXA Sagamihara Campus. It will take about one week to finish opening the sample container.

The curation operations are being carried out in cooperation with NASA.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27979
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-05-2010 08:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA update
Particles confirmed in the Hayabusa sample container

The origin of the particulate matter is unknown at this stage, whether it is from Earth or the asteroid. The particles will be studied closely.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27979
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-16-2010 07:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA update
Identification of origin of particles brought back by Hayabusa

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has been engaged in collecting and categorizing particles in the sampler container* that were brought back by the instrumental module of the asteroid exploration spacecraft "Hayabusa."

Based on the results of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and analyses of samples that were collected with a special spatula from sample catcher compartment "A", about 1,500 grains were identified as rocky particles, and most of them were judged to be of extraterrestrial origin, and definitely from Asteroid Itokawa.

Their size is mostly less than 10 micrometers, and handling these grains requires very special skills and techniques. JAXA is developing the necessary handling techniques and preparing the associated equipment for the initial (but more detailed) analyses of these ultra-minute particles.

music_space
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Posts: 1052
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 12-31-2010 12:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From NASA Science:
Dec. 29, 2010: The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hayabusa spacecraft has brought home to Earth tiny pieces of an alien world–asteroid Itokawa.

"It's an incredible feeling to have another world right in the palm of your hand," says Mike Zolensky, Associate Curator for Interplanetary Dust at the Johnson Space Center, and one of the three non-Japanese members of the science team. "We're seeing for the first time, up close, what an asteroid is actually made of!"

The actual article details the painstaking process to gather the some 1500 asteroid particles from the container since JAXA's Hayabusa came back in June 2010.


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