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  JAXA's Hayabusa to explore asteroid Itokawa (Page 2)

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Author Topic:   JAXA's Hayabusa to explore asteroid Itokawa
spaceuk
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posted 11-19-2005 02:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Down to 160 metres still at 7m/min.

spaceuk
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posted 11-19-2005 03:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Lot of anxious guys over at JAXA space centre watching the large tv screen.

No sign of jubilation yet...

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-19-2005 03:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
According to the Planetary Society, announcement of contact with the surface (if indeed it occured) will take place at 17:00 PST (0100 UTC / 10:00 JST), with a press conference at 19:00 PST.

spaceuk
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posted 11-19-2005 03:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not had a blog update for 30+ minutes now? Anyone else had any updates since 5:40am JST?

The engineers looked pretty anxious and certainly no jubilation when I would have thought touchdown should have occurred?

Lost contact maybe?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-19-2005 03:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From The Planetary Society blog:
An unconfirmed source -- another Japanese weblog -- has reported that Hayabusa has released the target marker and has started ascending again, and that it is not known whether it landed. Here's the Google translation of that weblog.

spaceuk
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posted 11-19-2005 03:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I get impression contact with Hayabusa is 'lost'?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-19-2005 04:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Again, according to Emily Lakdawalla with The Planetary Society:
...it now appears that Earth has rotated far enough to take the Deep Space Network station at Goldstone, through which Hayabusa has been transmitting, out of line with Hayabusa. Now there is a gap in communication with the spacecraft until it can be acquired at Usuda, Japan.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-19-2005 05:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Emily's latest update from The Planetary Society offers a 'smoothed' translation from the Japanese weblog mentioned earlier:
Prof. Matogawa said, 'Operations cannot confirm the ascent. Beacon from Hayabusa continues. Hayabusa descended in autonomous mode. The laser range finder on Hayabusa indicated an altitude of 17 meters. After that, descent stopped, but Hayabusa did not begin ascending. At 07:00 JST, Operations sent to Hayabusa the command to ascend. Operations is making the effort to understand what happened.'

It discharged the target marker. After that, it descended autonomously to 17 meters. Then there was neither rising nor falling, it stopped in place. Altitude at this time is not known. Whether it was hovering or had laded is unclear. After that, Usuda transmitted to it to rise and to enter into safe mode. Rise is not verified to present time.

spaceuk
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posted 11-20-2005 02:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the update - the JAXA blog stopped with last entry at 90 metre altitude.

This is what JAXA saying this morning (GMT):

At 5:46 a.m. on the 20th (Japan Standard Time) JAXA received a signal from an asteroid explorer, Hayabusa, which stated descending toward an asteroid, Itokawa, in the night of the 19th for touching down (landing and sampling), that it had released the target marker. The altitude of the Hayabusa at that time was about 40 meters, thus we are almost certain that the target marker reached on the surface of the Itokawa.
It does appear to have made descent as far as 17 metres altitude.

A wild guess but I wonder if the plate release kicked up enough dust to 'fool' the altitude sensors into thinking that the surface had been reached? Maybe this happened with Minerva release as well?

We'll have wait until JAXA give a more detailed report of events so far. I wonder if they may retry - on the planned 2nd landing - if the probe is intact?

Whatever has happened there are many lessons here to be learned for asteroid landings in the future.

The Hayabusa data combined with the NEAR Shoemaker successful landing and operation on asteroid Eros on 12 Feb,2001 will help define future landing spacecraft and operation rules.

spaceuk
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posted 11-21-2005 09:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I received this today from the Hayabusa Project Manager, to whom I am appreciative:
We made a first Touching Down (TD-1) attempt yesterday [Sunday].

Hayabusa released its 'Signature target Marker from 880,000 persons' at 40 m and successfully changed its attitude control to 'terrain alignment autonomous control using Laser Range Finder' at the altitude of just 17 m, below which Hayabusa itself stopped firing and started free fall descent to the surface. We were watching it via Doppler. But no touch-down occurred for surprisingly 30 minutes, during which the descent continued at very slow speed of about 2 cm/sec. We estimate Hayabusa drifted at very low altitude along the surface. Therefore, Hayabusa did not touch down the surface, but reached below 10 m altitude. In terms of the guidance and navigation as well as the 'Terrain Alignment Control', we think we achieved a big step.

We directed a command to Hayabusa to make an abort, since the sub-spacecraft point might have shifted so much from the intended area.

One concern was the surface temperature. The instruments temperature went high so much and we need to make sure if every instrument is still in order. This time, the guidance and navigation to the intended point was performed quite well with the residual speed of almost several mm/second.

Hayabusa fell into a Safe Mode at today's Touching-Down trial, due to some attitude anomaly very close to the altitude of about 10 m or so. The details are under investigation. The recovery operation has been performed successfully.

The project looks positively at the next opportunity, since almost every difficult step was now identified to function normally.

I've tidied up the email to make it read better in English but all the technical salient points are still in there.

spaceuk
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posted 11-23-2005 08:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I received another email today from Hayabusa Project Manager and the team are concerned that they may not be able to get into position for a retry. Here is a clip from email:
...Hayabusa is very far now from Itokawa and a bit concerned about whether actually it returns back to the starting position in time...

Scott
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posted 11-23-2005 09:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott   Click Here to Email Scott     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good news... Looks like it landed successfully after all!

Associated Press: Japan's Hayabusa Spacecraft Lands Successfully on Asteroid

Japan's space agency said Wednesday its spacecraft had successfully touched down on an asteroid 180 million miles from Earth despite an earlier announcement that it had failed.

On Sunday, JAXA officials had said the Hayabusa probe, on a mission to land on the asteroid named Itokawa, collect material, then bring it back to Earth, failed to touch down after maneuvering within yards of the surface.

However, the agency said Wednesday that data confirmed that Hayabusa had landed on the surface Sunday for a half-hour, although it failed to collect material.

collshubby
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posted 11-23-2005 11:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for collshubby   Click Here to Email collshubby     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If they make a second landing, as far as I know, this will be the first time a spacecraft has landed on another celestial body, launched from there, landing once again, and launching from that surface a second time. Would this be classified as the first reusable spacecraft to be used on another celestial body?

I hope they are successful the second time and are able to return samples.

spaceuk
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posted 11-25-2005 06:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Although not quite the same league as Hayabusa multi-km altitude retry, NASA's Surveyor-6 did a short 'hop' reflight that carried it to a height of 4 metres and horizontally 2.5 metres on the Moon.

Several other spacecraft have, of course, bounced to a 'stop' on various planetary bodies during landing attempts including lunas, rangers, surveyors, Mars rovers, Veneras...

Do we count Apollo lunar surface astronauts when they did their photo opportunity jumps e.g. John Young's jump?

spaceuk
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posted 11-25-2005 06:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hayabusa will make a second descent to touchdown and gather samples from asteroid Itokawa on early Saturday morning (Japanese time JST) - Friday evening in UK (GMT), Friday afternoon in eastern USA (EDT).

I understand they will run the Hayabusa Live Blog again.

At about 1pm GMT Friday Hayabusa was 20 km altitude starting position.

spaceuk
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posted 11-25-2005 10:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The blog is up and running.

As of 1:00 JST (Saturday morning in Japan, Friday night in UK), the distance between shape center of Itokawa and Hayabusa is approximately 1080 meters, and altitude is approximately 950 meters. Hayabusa is approaching Itokawa at a rate of three centimeters per second.

spaceuk
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posted 11-25-2005 03:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hayabusa has had a 'GO' for vertical descent and touchdown on this its second desecnt to Itokawa. Its altitude is around 360 metres at time of writing.

spaceuk
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posted 11-25-2005 04:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Looks like Hayabusa has again failed to scoop up material fom Itokawa since JAXA says it is now ascending again for some inexplicable reason they say.

spaceuk
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posted 11-26-2005 09:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Japanese controllers at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) confirmed that the Hayabusa touched down on Itokawa for a few seconds.

The probe fired a small metal ball into the surface and apparently collected the resulting powdery debris.

"The process of sampling also seems to have gone very well," said Jaxa's Kiyotaka Yashiro.

DavidH
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posted 12-08-2005 09:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidH   Click Here to Email DavidH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
More bad news:
A Japanese spacecraft is likely to have failed in its landmark mission to collect the first-ever samples from an asteroid and also faces trouble returning to Earth, the space program said Wednesday.

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency had earlier said the Hayabusa probe "most probably" succeeded in gathering dust from the Itokawa asteroid, 290 million kilometers (180 million miles) from Earth, in late November.

"But now we found that the possibility is very high that a metal bullet to collect samples was actually not fired," said an official of the agency, which operates the probe.

spaceuk
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posted 12-09-2005 05:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
An update from JAXA - including close images of the 880,000 name target marker on Itokawa.

Hayabusa is 550 km from Itokawa preparing for departure to Earth - if still feasible with loss of thrusters.

spaceuk
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posted 12-10-2005 01:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I received a further communication from JAXA about Hayabusa. It was quite a lengthy reply to some questions I posed to them and is too long to present in full.

However, they say Hayabusa is now leaving Itokawa. The spacecraft has already left Itokawa and as of December 6, the distance to Itokawa was about 550 km with the relative speed of about 5 km per hour.

The spacecraft was given a spin of about 1 degree per second.

On December 8, communication with the spacecraft was established via medium gain antenna at the bit rate of 256 bps.

At the moment they are very unsure whether soil was actually collected at Itokawa by Hayabusa since on December 6, a part of the data recorded by Hayabusa was reproduced and the pyro-controller data retrieved. It showed no "fire" evidence about the pyros for the projectile initiation. However, in turn, there was NO "no-fire" evidence, either!

At the same time, there was found an incorrectly positioned disarming command that may have been activated prior to the touching down. Pyros act with both arming and firing commands. The firing command was issued as reported before.

There was also glimpsed inconsistent phenomenon that may support the pyro initiation, such as the temperature increase.

However, detailed inspection of the sequence and command log is currently under way.

They also lost RCS fuel due to a leakage.

On November 26, after the completion of the correction canceling the ascent speed, the RCS thrusters were switched to the subsystem-B, but there was a leak from one thruster on the upper panel of the spacecraft belonging to subsystem-B. Shutting off the latching valves for both the two subsystems was commanded and it worked. But some acceleration due to the leak was observed.

Due to the leakage, orientation of the spacecraft was lost for a while and solar power dropped severely. Because of this, the onboard batteries were almost drained.

However, I understand orientation has been regained and, hopefully, power will be built up over a period of time?

They have since tried to use the RCS jets but this failed since they believe that they may have frozen after the command to shutoff both systems? So, instead, they believe they have enough Xe-gas onboard for the ion engine to return Haybusa to Earth and for attitude control during the remaining mission. But, they still work at perhaps getting the RCS jets back - though fuel is assumed to be now very low since the leak. However, they assume the ion engine is working fine at the moment but they are still checking this out and will be around 10 days for them to do this.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-21-2009 12:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
By way of a long overdue update for this thread...
Asteroid Explorer "HAYABUSA" Ion Engine Anomaly

On November 4, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency identified that one of the main ion engines (Thruster D) aboard the Asteroid Explorer "HAYABUSA" had autonomously stopped detecting a high neutralizer voltage owing to degradation. The HAYABUSA was during the second propulsion period in its return cruise back to the Earth in June 2010. Since the anomaly was identified, the project team has been trying to restart the engine while investigation of the causes; however, the engine has not been restarted yet as of today.

JAXA is currently under diagnostic investigation of the ion engines system aboard the HAYABUSA and trying to build an alternative sequence that helps the HAYABUSA return back to the Earth safely. JAXA will inform you of the update as soon as available.

Note: The HAYABUSA is equipped with four ion engines (Thrusters A through D,) and each thruster is in the following status. In the current plan, two thrusters, Thrusters C and D, would be used in the second propulsion period in return cruise back to the Earth.

  • Thruster A: operation suspended due to instability just after the launch
  • Thruster B: operation suspended due to high neutralizer voltage owing to degradation (since April 2007)
  • Thrusters C and D: Both of them have indicated slight high neutralizer voltage owing also to degradation. Thruster C is currently not driven, but it is operable.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-21-2009 12:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA release
Restoration of Asteroid Explorer, HAYABUSA's Return Cruise

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has been studying measures to deal with the anomaly detected in one of the ion engines aboard the Asteroid Explorer "HAYABUSA" as reported on November 9, 2009. As a result, the project team has come up with a recovery operation plan, and the project decided to resume the operations, while carefully watching the status of the ion engines.

JAXA has been studying the characteristics of the neutralizers and the ion sources. During the study, enough thrust is found available for the rest of the cruise, when the neutralizer of the engine-A is combined with the ion source of the engine-B.

While the operation still needs monitored carefully, the project team has concluded the spacecraft can maintain the current return cruise schedule back to the earth around June of 2010, if the new engines configuration continues to work as planned.

The project team will attentively monitor the return cruise, and JAXA will inform you of any update whenever available.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-10-2010 08:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA release
The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to announce that Trajectory Correction Maneuver-4 (TCM-4) operation was successfully completed (15:00 June 9th, 2010 JST). By this operation, Hayabusa spacecraft was precisely guided to Woomera Prohibited Area (WPA) in Australia.

Hayabusa system is going well.

Hayabusa is expected to touch down in Australia at approximately 9:00 a.m. CDT (1400 GMT) on Sunday, June 13.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-10-2010 08:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Astronomers to Observe Hayabusa Homecoming

A group of astronomers from NASA, JAXA and other organizations are flying to the other side of the world for a front row seat and a rare opportunity to study a spacecraft's fiery descent through Earth's atmosphere.

A Douglas DC-8 airborne laboratory departed yesterday evening from NASA's Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility at Palmdale, Calif., carrying nearly 30 scientists and their instruments to Melbourne, Australia to make final preparations for the highly-anticipated return of JAXA's Hayabusa spacecraft. This luminous re-entry will mark the end of the spacecraft's seven-year journey to bring a sample of asteroid Itokawa back to Earth. Hayabusa is expected to fall to Earth over a vast, unpopulated area of Australia at about midnight local time (7 a.m. PDT) on Sunday, June 13, 2010.

Earlier this week, JAXA announced it successfully completed the guidance of the Hayabusa spacecraft, so that will land in the Woomera Prohibited Area in Australia.

"Hayabusa is hurtling toward Earth at an immense speed, comparable to that of an asteroid impact," said Peter Jenniskens, the observation campaign's principal investigator and a scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., and the SETI Institute, Mountain View, Calif. "The capsule that protects the asteroid sample will be only 6,500 feet ahead of the rest of the spacecraft, which will break into numerous pieces, essentially making it a man-made meteor."

Jenniskens and the team of astronomers onboard the DC-8 will have their instruments secured near the plane's specialized windows. This, paired with their altitude of 39,000 feet far above light pollution and clouds, will enable the scientists to study what happens when the spacecraft and sample return capsule heat up high in the atmosphere. When Hayabusa reaches an altitude of 190,000 feet, its heat shield will experience temperatures of more than 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit, while the gas surrounding the capsule will reach 13,000 degrees Fahrenheit, or hotter than the surface of the sun.

The team's primary goal during the airborne mission is to study the Hayabusa capsule's re-entry to gain technological insight into the heat shield that designers and engineers can use while developing future exploration vehicles. Because of Hayabusa's unique heat shield material, shape and the tremendous interplanetary re-entry speed of 7.58 miles per second, scientists expect its descent will provide new, valuable information about heat shields for computer models of re-entry conditions. JAXA's Hayabusa is expected to be the second fastest man-made object to return to Earth; NASA's Stardust sample return capsule set the record re-entry speed of 7.95 miles per second in January 2006.

"The return of Hayabusa provides NASA and JAXA with a rare opportunity to monitor the performance of an atmospheric entry vehicle at speeds much higher than that of the space shuttle returning from low-Earth orbit," said Jay Grinstead, the observation campaign project manager and a research scientist at NASA Ames. "The spectrum of the light emitted by the gas and surface at these extreme temperatures tells us about the physics and chemistry of atmospheric entry. Our vantage point onboard the DC-8 and the variety of instruments enable us to track the evolution of the spectrum and compare it to simulations used for design and analysis of entry systems."

The airborne observation team also will provide JAXA with data and images obtained during the flight to correlate with JAXA's ground optical and radio observations and assist in locating the capsule on Earth. Since the breakup of the main spacecraft will be visible as well, scientists will use images of the debris to validate computer models astronomers use to predict how an object will fragment and disperse as it enters Earth's atmosphere at these high speeds.

NASA astronomers made similar airborne studies from NASA's DC-8 flying observatory for the September 2008 re-entry of the European Space Agency's Automated Transfer Vehicle "Jules Verne," as well as the Stardust sample return re-entry airborne campaigns. During those missions, NASA scientists studied the light emitted by the descending spacecraft, to better understand the mechanisms of atmospheric entry heats of natural and man-made objects.

The Hayabusa airborne observation campaign is supported by the In-Space Propulsion Technology Project in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters, Washington.

Blackarrow
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posted 06-10-2010 04:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Whether or not this amazing spacecraft survives re-entry and provides a sample of an asteroid, the Japanese Space Agency should be applauded for an amazing space odyssey.

tegwilym
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posted 06-11-2010 05:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Definitely! They are fairly new at this interplanetary stuff, good to see them advancing quickly. If it makes it back or not even without a chunk of asteroid, it's a huge achievement for any country I think!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-12-2010 09:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Emily Lakdawalla summarizes the live views for the descent:
Here are links to webcasts that I know about: The NASA DC-8 that will be observing the entry from the air plans to offer live feed, but based on what they say on their website I am not sanguine about them being able to handle the bandwidth in real time; here's a Google Earth KML file to use to track the DC-8. Live! Universe is offering a Ustream feed broadcast from Glendambo; I have no idea whether it'll show anything. Media-i.com and NEC will be offering the JAXA control room feed, which will have no audio. "Space Education Television" will be offering some kind of broadcast, but I'm not sure whether it's the audio-less control room feed or something commented; if commented, it'll be in Japanese.
And the projected schedule...
  • June 12, 2:00 p.m. CDT - Hayabusa passes within the Moon's orbit, 380,000 kilometers from Earth

  • June 13, 2:00 a.m. CDT - Hayabusa passes over Uchinoura Bay, from which it launched seven years ago

  • June 13, 5:51 a.m. CDT - At an altitude of 60,000 kilometers (roughly four Earth diameters), the sample return capsule separates with a velocity, relative to the mothership, of 10 centimeters per second. With three hours remaining in the flight, the two will be separated only by about a kilometer when they hit the top of Earth's atmosphere.

  • June 13, 8:46 a.m. CDT - Hayabusa and the capsule are at an altitude of only 600 kilometers, traveling at 12 kilometers per second, and pass over western Australia

  • June 13, 8:51 a.m. CDT - Atmospheric entry at an altitude of 200 kilometers and a shallow angle of only 10 degrees. Over the next minute or two, the capsule and mothership begin to shine brightly, achieving a maximum brightness of magnitude -5 (brighter than Venus). The mothership, not designed for atmospheric entry, will explode and burn up.

  • June 13, About 9:11 a.m. CDT - Landing: It will take 15 to 20 minutes for the capsule to descend under parachute.

Blackarrow
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posted 06-12-2010 11:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"CDT" has me a little confused. At first I assumed cS was (not illogically) using "Texas time" but I now see there is an Australian time-zone called CDT which is very different, and it seems more logical that the times quoted are Australian times. Just to be quite clear about this, when the probe is scheduled to land back on Mother Earth, what time will it be in the UK?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-12-2010 11:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"CDT" in this case is indeed "Texas time," or rather Central Daylight Time (US), which is the timezone reflected on the date stamps on this site.

9:11 a.m. CDT is 1411 GMT/UTC.

Philip
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posted 06-13-2010 02:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
An amazing mission and congratulations to the JAXA team to keep this asteroid explorer going after 7 years.

Meanwhile, the Aoshima model company released a 1/32 scale Hayabusa styrene model. It comes with a little gold foil and brass square tubes to hold the solar arrays.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-13-2010 08:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA: The reentry capsule was successfully separated from Hayabusa spacecraft at 19:51 on June 13th, 2010 (JST) [5:51 a.m. CDT]. Spacecraft is going well.

Less than 30 minutes remaining until atmospheric reentry...

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-13-2010 10:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA release
Asteroid Explorer "Hayabusa" (MUSES-C) Reentry

Hayabusa separated the capsule at 7:51 p.m. [6:51 a.m. CDT] and reentered the atmosphere at 10:51 p.m. on June 13th, 2010 (JST) [9:51 a.m. CDT].

Hayabusa was launched on May 9, 2003 by M-V rocket and operated for approximately seven years. During its operation, JAXA was able to achieve the difficult mission including Hayabusa's sample capture attempt after its touchdown on the asteroid named Itokawa, and Hayabusa's return to the earth overcoming many hardships.

JAXA would like to appreciate every support to JAXA leading this mission to a great success.

The Hayabusa capsule has just returned to Woomera, Australia. As the next step, JAXA will move forward to the capsule recovery.

Ground camera in Australia captures Hayabusa's reentry:


Credit: Wakayama University


Reentry and capsule separation from NASA DC-8 over Australia. Higher resolution AVI Credit: NASA


Final image transmitted by Hayabusa before reentry. Credit: JAXA

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-13-2010 12:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA release
Result of Capsule Search by Helicopter

After the Hayabusa capsule reentry, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency searched for the capsule by a helicopter and discovered it at the expected landing area in [Woomera Prohibited Area], Australia at 11:56 p.m. on June 13th, 2010 (JST) [10:56 a.m. CDT].

JAXA will start retrieving it in the afternoon on June 14, 2010 (JST).


Credit: JAXA

gliderpilotuk
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Registered: Feb 2002

posted 06-13-2010 01:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Outstanding. Thanks for great coverage, Robert.

ilbasso
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Posts: 1501
From: Greensboro, NC USA
Registered: Feb 2006

posted 06-13-2010 08:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Congratulations to JAXA for an astounding mission! I know that there were no human lives at stake, but the sheer inventiveness and determination involved in bringing Hayabusa home again rivals the engineering success of Apollo 13's recovery. Coming the same week as the successful deployment of the first solar sail on IKAROS, Japan is riding high in spaceflight and deserves worldwide recognition for its accomplishments.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27979
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-14-2010 08:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA release
Retrieving the Capsule completed

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has completed the retrieval of the Hayabusa capsule at 4:08 p.m. on June 14, 2010 JST.

The capsule is deemed intact at the moment.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27979
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-14-2010 08:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA release
Capsule heat shield found

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to announce that based on the result of the heat shield search, JAXA found it in [Woomera Prohibited Area] at around 2 p.m. on June 14, 2010 (JST).

JAXA will retrieve the heat shield after tomorrow.


Heat shield (front side). Credit: JAXA


Heat shield (back side). Credit: JAXA

Philip
Member

Posts: 4859
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 06-14-2010 10:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ilbasso:
Japan is riding high in spaceflight and deserves worldwide recognition for its accomplishments.
You're 100% right, JAXA wrote history!!!

Congratulations to everyone involved in this spectacular asteroid exploration and sample return mission!


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