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  China's Shenzhou VI mission (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   China's Shenzhou VI mission
DavidH
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posted 05-12-2004 02:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidH   Click Here to Email DavidH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Associated Press: China Planning Autumn 2005 Space Mission
China plans to launch a pair of astronauts into orbit in autumn 2005 in its second manned space mission, the official Xinhua News Agency reported Wednesday.

The flight will last five to seven days, Xinhua said, citing Qi Faren, the space program's chief designer.

spaceuk
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posted 07-28-2004 01:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
China is expected to launch its second manned spacecraft, Shenzhou VI, on a five-day mission in the second half of next year, state media quoted a Chinese space expert as saying Tuesday.

Huang Chunping, chief of the China Manned Space Program's rocket carrier system, added China would realise its dream of space walk with the launch of Shenzhou VII, although he did not specify a date, Xinhua news agency reported.

Huang, 66, who was speaking to children in a speech in Fuzhou, Fujian province, said the mainland also aimed to establish a laboratory in space by 2010 and a space station by 2015, the agency said.

cosmos-walter
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posted 07-30-2004 05:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cosmos-walter   Click Here to Email cosmos-walter     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There will be two taikonauts onboard Shenzhou 6. Yang Liwei will not fly.

DavidH
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posted 12-23-2004 11:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidH   Click Here to Email DavidH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
China has announced that the Shenzhou VI manned flight will take place in September.

DavidH
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posted 03-08-2005 09:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidH   Click Here to Email DavidH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Going a little bit further than the standard regurgitation of the small handful of facts China has leaked about Shenzhou VI, SpaceDaily has an article that includes some speculation on why it's taking China two years to launch its follow-up manned mission.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-07-2005 11:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
China has announced that their next Shenzhou mission later this year will carry souvenir items. There is there is no fee involved, but its only open to Chinese nationals (living in the mainland, Hong Kong and elsewhere). Applications are currently being accepted and the best ideas will be accepted before the mission for flight.

lucspace
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posted 05-15-2005 06:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for lucspace   Click Here to Email lucspace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Views of the new spaceship are here and here.

kosmonavtka
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posted 05-23-2005 08:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kosmonavtka     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If anyone is interested, there is a new page at the Go Taikonauts! site with diagrams of the Shenzhou spacecraft.

lucspace
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posted 06-12-2005 12:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lucspace   Click Here to Email lucspace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So, what's this about?

Weird-looking headset... who is the taikonaut? Is this for real or pics of a movie being made about Shenzhou 5?

Tonyq
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posted 06-12-2005 05:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tonyq   Click Here to Email Tonyq     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Undertaking a quick 'Babelfish' translation indicates this is a 'soap opera' (their words) about the Chinese space programme, so presumably the man featured is an actor!

spaceuk
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posted 09-07-2005 11:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Suggesting Shenzhou VI may launch at end September rather than in October?

spaceuk
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posted 09-19-2005 01:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
China's first taikonaut, Yang Liwei, will not be onboard the two-man Shenzhou VI mission, state news said earlier today.

spaceuk
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posted 09-26-2005 04:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
China has announced 13 October 2005 for the launch date of Shenzhou VI.

z_tal_site
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posted 09-26-2005 02:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for z_tal_site   Click Here to Email z_tal_site     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Somebody knows if the pairs Zhai-Wu / Nie-Li are confirmed as crews?

Astro Bill
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posted 10-08-2005 04:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Astro Bill   Click Here to Email Astro Bill     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
China has announced that their second manned mission (carrying two taikonauts) will take place on October 13th, however, cold weather may delay the launch.

lucspace
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posted 10-10-2005 09:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lucspace   Click Here to Email lucspace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Click away guys, some nice stuff here, but the Chinese version is better... just try anything.

spaceuk
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posted 10-11-2005 06:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
China will launch its second manned space mission from a remote desert region tomorrow morning Wednesday 12 October 2005, the official Xinhua news agency said.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-11-2005 12:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The unofficial website Go Taikonauts! has pictures of the three crews (as well as reports that the likely chosen two will be Fei Junlong and Nie Haisheng) and that a launch time of 9:30 a.m. October 12 (Beijing Time) has been set. That would set the launch at 0130 GMT October 12 or 8:30 p.m. CDT tonight.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-11-2005 06:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Launch is now said to be at 9:00 a.m. (Beijing Time) (source: Xinhua)

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-11-2005 08:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Source: People's Daily
China's second manned spacecraft, the Shenzhou-VI with astronauts Fei Junlong and Nie Haisheng onboard, was lifted into the sky by a Long March II F carrier rocket from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gansu Province at 09:00 (local time) Oct 12, 2005.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-11-2005 10:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"As a member of the Association of Space Explorers and a three-time space flyer, I am absolutely convinced that the more human presence there is in orbital space and beyond, the better for all humanity in understanding our place in a very limited one planet environment. We're all crew members in spaceship Earth. We've got to get that awareness into the minds of not only the people, but government officials around the world. So, more nations involved is better from that standpoint.

"I am sure it is going to stimulate economic and maybe even political interest and maybe even some contention about the prospect of another nation in human space flight, but I think it should be viewed as, if anything, a positive tension - if its a tension at all - but again I applaud the Chinese government for both the committment and capability to do so.

"We have to look forward to a successful launch and a succesful return of any and all taikonauts and Chinese flyers to space and back again."

- Space Shuttle payload specialist Charlie Walker in an interview with collectSPACE this afternoon from the 19th annual Association of Space Explorers (ASE) Planetary Congress in Salt Lake City, Utah. ASE has extended invitations, through the United Nations, to China's flown taikonauts to take part in their organization.

spaceuk
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posted 10-12-2005 08:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We've had pretty good visual coverage in UK of this launch through major tv news channels today.

We saw the two taikonauts dressed in the flight suits parading through the small snow storm at the space centre enroute to the launch vehicle.

We saw the vehicle on pad and then the mission control centre in last few seconds of countdown - consoles labeled in Chinese as you would imagine!

Then we saw the liftoff and several exterior tv camera shots looking down the rocket body towards earth.

We saw what I think was Shenzhou VI a short distance away taken from a camera on the last (?) stage of rocket.

Later we saw the two taikonauts in orbit still in their couches.

spaceuk
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posted 10-12-2005 08:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
China news agency put this story out on what is obviously a display collectible on its return:
Shenzhou-6 spacecraft, China's second manned space mission and first to send two astronauts into orbit, is the first to carry a Chinese language newspaper to space.

A special issue commemorating Shenzhou-6 space flight of Shanghai-based Jiefang Daily, one of China's leading newspapers, is also possible the first newspaper send to space by mankind, according to professional search results.

The special issue carries the essay of On Earth, printed by Jiefang Daily's predecessor Shenbao 100 years ago, the first on astronomy ever present by a Chinese newspaper.

Theories in the essay are recorded in ancient Chinese books, indicating the Chinese exploration of the space thousands of years ago, and sending the special issue into space is designed to marking the long history of space quest, said Yin Minghua, president of the Jiefang Daily Group.

The newspaper is made of silk, a first-class writing material in ancient China, to better keep its color and quality. Carried by China's most technologically advanced Shenzhou-6 capsule, it also symbolizes Chinese heritage of their long civilization.

The 50-gram paper is put in the re-entry module. It is not certain whether the two astronauts aboard will read it in space.

Also sent into the space are four embroidery pieces featuring signs of China's second manned space flight and Chinese astronaut center, a painting of Chairman Mao Zedong announcing the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949 and a Chinese character of "Fu" or happiness.

The first three pieces will be used for scientific research after the craft returns. Each of the four weighs no more than 200 grams.

ejectr
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posted 10-12-2005 08:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Any two-line-element data anywhere. I just updated mine on my satellite tracking software and the latest was "Object A" but it is too high of an inclination angle.

Steve Procter
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posted 10-12-2005 08:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Steve Procter   Click Here to Email Steve Procter     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The BBC website has a feature on the launch on their news page "In pictures - China second space mission": eight photos of the crew, launch and Chinese 'reaction'.

HouseDadX4
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posted 10-12-2005 04:06 PM           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not to poke fun or be mean or anything, but, I'm having a little bit of trouble comprehending the term "taikonaut" and where the term relates to the business of space. I mean, America has it's Astronauts and Russia it's Cosmonauts and those are great names and fitting for the business of space, but to me, taikonaut sounds like a line of toys manufactured by Mattel or Fisher Price..Just can't get past this one... can anyone clear up this term for me?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-12-2005 04:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From the website Go Taikonauts! (which is currently offline due to the demand for SZ-6 information):
"Taikong" is a Chinese word that means space or cosmos. The resulted prefix "taiko-" is similar to "astro-" and "cosmo-" that makes three words perfectly symmetric, both in meaning and in form. Removing "g" from "taikong" is to make the word short and easy to pronounce. On the other side, its pronounciation is also close to "taikong ren", the Chinese words "space men".
In Chinese, the term yuhangyuan ("space navigator") has long been used as well.

kosmonavtka
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posted 10-12-2005 09:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kosmonavtka     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Some photos of the launch are at the Novosti Kosmonavtiki news page (issue 506), scroll down a bit.

the_tartanterror
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posted 10-13-2005 10:32 PM           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am on the nightshift in Flight Ops and I just caught the end of a news snippet on BBC radio which said that Shenzhou 6 has a problem with its orbit.

Checked the BCC website and here is the link to the story.

Rodina
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posted 10-13-2005 09:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rodina   Click Here to Email Rodina     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
From the website Go Taikonauts! (which is currently offline due to the demand for SZ-6 information): In Chinese, the term yuhangyuan ("space navigator") has long been used as well.

Yes, which is a fine word if you are speaking Chinese. But English has clearly adopted the word "taikonaut" for Chinese astronaut, which is good.

ALAIN
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posted 10-14-2005 05:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ALAIN     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Found this Belgian newspaper website with good photos of the Chinese crewmembers. Does anyone has these in high resolution?

Rex Hall
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posted 10-14-2005 05:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rex Hall   Click Here to Email Rex Hall     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
They are the same photo with the heads pasted on.

spaceuk
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posted 10-14-2005 07:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Someone wanted early Shenzhou-6 TLE: see this though these will be out of date (slightly) since the RCS firing earlier.

But, will give a good indicator where/when to view.

collshubby
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posted 10-14-2005 11:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for collshubby   Click Here to Email collshubby     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As far calling them Yuhangyuans or Taikonauts, I prefer Taikonauts. It is easier to spell, pronounce, and keeps the "nauts" theme.

spaceuk
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posted 10-14-2005 01:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by the_tartanterror:
I am on the nightshift in Flight Ops and I just caught the end of a news snippet on BBC radio which said that Shenzhou 6 has a problem with its orbit.
Stories emanating out of China that Shenzhou-6 may have its mission terminated earlier - maybe by as much as one day?

With the 'slippage in orbit' earlier - which they corrected - maybe they have a onboard G&N problem? They have told the MCC 'scientific and technological' staff to proceed with 'caution'.

Not sure how they corrected the orbit problem (maybe RCS jets?). I can't see that a service module main engine under-power or early cutoff problem would make them issue 'caution' warning. But a faulty G&N unit might make them err on the safe side - staying on orbit until a decent window for descent becomes possible and bring them down earlier? Some reports have said that the day early return would be because of trying to avoid possible bad weather conditions if it went for full mission and for the crew "well being"?

Suppose we'll have wait and see what further news comes out in next few days.

spaceuk
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posted 10-14-2005 01:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Its interesting that they have put this story out about abort modes. Maybe preparing 'us' (the viewers of this mission) for an early landing?

They did use thrusters for the orbit correction firing.

spaceuk
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posted 10-15-2005 01:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"The successful launch of Shenzhou-6 represents another major step forward in China's manned space flight program," said President Hu. at the Chinese MCC.

"The motherland and people are proud of you. I hope you will successfully complete your task by carrying out the mission calmly and carefully and have a triumphant return," he said.

Fei thanked the president for his concern and the support of the people and said "we will definitely fulfill the mission completely."

After the dialogue, Hu made a brief speech at the command and control center, urging the scientists at the center to ensure the two taikonauts aboard Shenzhou-6 spacecraft return soundly.

The president expressed the hope that space workers make persistent efforts to do a good follow-up job, so as to ensure the safe and smooth return of the re-entry module with the two taikonauts aboard.

Reading between the lines (which can be 'dangerous'!) whatever problem they had they may have overcome but looks like it may have caused a few flutters?

Hu's words like "...urging the scientists at the center to ensure..." and "...space workers make persistent efforts to do a good follow-up job..." may be indicating the 'problem' may have been seen as serious earlier before they have overcome it?

Also Fei's reply thanking Hu for his concern
and "...we will definitely fulfill the mission completely." ...might suggest that the problem was deemed very serious at the time but that it has now been overcome?

Another news report noted that they had undertaken half dozen or more capsule recovery trial runs in the prime and secondary landing areas to "retrieve" the taikonauts safely and speedily.

Time will tell.

Dirk
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posted 10-15-2005 04:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dirk   Click Here to Email Dirk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Photos of the taikonauts can be found on Space Facts.

kosmonavtka
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posted 10-15-2005 11:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kosmonavtka     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
An article at "The Australian" space section (the only major online newspaper here to HAVE a space section):
If two dazed Chinese astronauts drop from space into the Australian outback this weekend, it will trigger an espionage plot worthy of an airport novel.

China's intelligence agencies have drawn up plans to thwart over-eager ASIO officers in the event that the Shenzhou VI space capsule crashes into the dust of the Australian desert.

Fearful that local rescue personnel and ASIO spies may arrive at the crash scene first, and take an unhealthy interest in the spacecraft's rocket technology, Beijing has moved to make its space capsule burglar-proof.

In a solution that any home insurance company would applaud, the Chinese have created a special key to unlock the spacecraft and have chosen not to give a copy to Australia.

Instead, the secret key is resting in the safe hands of an unnamed Chinese military attache at the Chinese embassy in Canberra.

In the event of a crash-landing, that Chinese official will be rushed into the desert, key in hand, to ensure that no one else unlocks China's secrets of rocket science.

Vostok
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posted 10-16-2005 04:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Vostok   Click Here to Email Vostok     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Safe landing for Shenzhou VI. Astronauts in good condition. Rescue helicopter landed near spacecraft.


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