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  [Discuss] ISS yearlong mission: Kelly, Kornienko (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] ISS yearlong mission: Kelly, Kornienko
Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-05-2012 03:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Please use this topic to discuss the first yearlong mission aboard the International Space Station by NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Roscosmos cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko from March 2015 through March 2016.

Lasv3
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posted 11-26-2012 10:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lasv3   Click Here to Email Lasv3     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is there a back-up crew named, or planned?

dabolton
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posted 11-26-2012 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dabolton     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What is involved in a two year training period, especially for such a veteran ISS pair?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-26-2012 01:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dabolton:
What is involved in a two year training period, especially for such a veteran ISS pair?
From what I understand, the training is not too different (in length or scope) from the shorter expeditions. Current preparation time for a six month stay is about two years as well, which takes into account the time needed to travel between training locations (U.S., Russia, Europe, Japan and Canada) as well as avoid scheduling conflicts between training crews.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-05-2012 09:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Lasv3:
Is there a back-up crew named, or planned?
NASA said today that Scott Kelly's backup will be decided as part of the normal schedule for six month increments, so in about four to five months.

Kornienko said today that his backup is Sergei Volkov.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 12-05-2012 09:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Associated Press reports Kelly was among four astronauts on NASA's short list for the assignment.

Furthermore, "Each had served as a commander aboard the space station, and was able to perform spacewalks and robot arm operations. Medical information also went into the selection: A crew member could not have exceeded his limit for exposure to cosmic radiation, for instance."

Which begs the questions: Who were the other three; in a Top 10 list of NASA astronauts with the most ISS time, where does Kelly fall?; and in a Top 10 list of NASA astronauts' spaceflight time with shuttle and ISS combined, where does Kelly fall?

PowerCat
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posted 12-06-2012 04:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for PowerCat   Click Here to Email PowerCat     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I wonder if it was Jeff Williams, Mike Fincke, and Peggy Whitson?

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 12-06-2012 11:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would have figured Foale — and I'll admit, its partly because I'd like to see him get a seventh flight.

But he has Mir experience as well as ISS, and it would be interesting to see a translation of health experiences from Mir to ISS to what is essentially a proto-Mars flight. If anything, Foale should be Kelly's backup.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-06-2012 11:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Whoever is assigned to Kelly as a backup will be flying on their own six-month expedition flight later in the rotation...

brianjbradley
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posted 12-06-2012 04:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for brianjbradley   Click Here to Email brianjbradley     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With the commander, EVA and SSRMS experience rationale, Doug Wheelock could also have been a candidate. He mentioned in a tweet several months ago that he anticipated being assigned to an increment that would fly in 2015 specifically. He could also be a possible back-up candidate as he has flown with Kelly and would slip in for him a little more easily.

That said, I think he is on leave from NASA flying in OEF and unavailable for flight assignment.

Delta7
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posted 12-22-2012 10:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Presumably Kelly will serve in a backup role first, likely to Barry Wilmore if the current pattern of assignments holds.

If Kelly were then called upon to replace Wilmore, especially shortly before the mission, would he still remain aloft for a year? If so, would Kornienko be launched at the same time (replacing Serova)? That might present some unique logistical challenges on short notice. Not to mention changing the sequence for launching a spaceflight participant.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-22-2012 12:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I believe Kelly said that if he or Kornienko were not available to fly on the yearlong mission, then the expedition(s) would revert to a six month schedule.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-14-2015 07:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA's Human Research Program now has a dedicated website for the yearlong mission and the twins study.
The One-Year Mission will focus on seven categories of research. In March 2015, American Astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian Cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko will begin collaborative investigations on the International Space Station (ISS). They will reside on the ISS for a year, which is twice as long as typical U.S. missions. These investigations are expected to yield beneficial knowledge on the medical, psychological and biomedical challenges faced by astronauts during long-duration space flight.

The Twins Study is ten separate investigations coordinating together and sharing all data and analysis as one large, integrated research team. The study will focus on four categories of research. NASA has selected 10 investigations to conduct with identical twin astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly. These investigations will provide broader insight into the subtle effects and changes that may occur in spaceflight as compared to Earth by studying two individuals who have the same genetics, but are in different environments for one year.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-19-2015 09:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Scott Kelly will attend the President's State of the Union address on Tuesday (Jan. 20) as a guest of the First Lady.
Imagine carrying out hundreds of scientific and research experiments, every day, for a year... in space.

For American astronaut Scott Kelly, that will soon be his reality. This March, this native of Houston, Texas will launch to the International Space Station and become the first American to live and work aboard the orbiting laboratory for a year-long mission.

Not only will he be conducting studies on cutting-edge technology development, he and his crew will compare medical data from Scott and hist twin brother astronaut Mark Kelly to see how the human body responds over time in space. This research will help move our country forward toward President Obama's goal of sending humans to Mars by the 2030s.

An astronaut since 1996, Scott has logged more than 180 days in space and has served as both pilot and commander on space shuttle missions, including a long-duration mission on the International Space Station. So he should feel right at home.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-25-2015 05:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Scott Kelly's must-have item for this yearlong mission is a "superhero belt," the Associated Press reports.
Kelly went beltless during his five-month mission at the International Space Station a few years back, and he hated how his shirttails kept floating out of his pants. So this time, the 51-year-old retired Navy captain packed "a military, tactical-style thing" that can hold a tool pouch.

Actually, scratch pouch. He prefers "superhero utility belt."

Kelly's partner on the yearlong stay at the space station — Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko — can't do without his vitamins. When their Soyuz rocket blasts off from Kazakhstan on Saturday (Friday afternoon in the U.S.), three bottles of over-age-50 vitamins will be on board.

onesmallstep
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posted 03-25-2015 08:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for onesmallstep   Click Here to Email onesmallstep     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wow! Great to hear that astronauts/cosmonauts are just like us (older) folks and need their vitameatavegamins (with apologies to I Love Lucy )

dabolton
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posted 03-26-2015 10:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dabolton     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Scott should brought along a Scott's evest. Dozens of pockets in them.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-30-2015 10:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA video release
NASA Administrator, President's Science Advisor Speak with Astronaut on Yearlong Station Mission

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden joined John Holdren, science advisor to President Obama and director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and former astronaut Mark Kelly for the first public conversation with astronaut Scott Kelly from the International Space Station on Monday, March 30.

The event aired live on NASA Television at 2:45 p.m. EDT (1945 GMT).

Kelly launched Friday on the first-ever yearlong mission to the International Space Station. His mission will help scientists better understand how the human body reacts and adapts to the harsh environment of space, and is critical to advancing NASA's plans to send humans on a journey to Mars.

Mark Kelly, who flew four space shuttle missions and commanded the final flight of space shuttle Endeavour, will participate in biomedical studies on the ground while his twin is on board the orbiting laboratory.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-08-2015 02:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Jimmy Fallon weighed the pros and cons of being in space for a year on The Tonight Show:

To which Scott Kelly replied on Twitter:

Good thing [my girlfriend] can't text me on #ISS. I left my phone on Earth.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-10-2015 07:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Following up on the above clip, Jimmy Fallon mentioned Scott Kelly's reply tweet during a commercial break taping The Tonight Show with guest Julia Louis-Dreyfus:

To Scott Kelly replied on Twitter:

I can hear you. I also read lips better than Jimmy Fallon. Doing great! Ask again [in] October. I'll be here.
To which, Julia Louis-Dreyfus replied:
Ok, my mind is officially blown. Do we look so tiny from where you are?
To which Kelly wrote:
Julia, yes, people look so tiny you can't see them. Continents still pretty large.
To which Louis-Dreyfus responded:
Roger that. Thank you for clarification.

One last question (I know you are busy) - do you get HBO up there? #veep

Tykeanaut
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posted 04-15-2015 02:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With any future long duration missions sure to include female astronauts I am a little puzzled as to why this mission was not a mixed crew?

Having just read an interesting article by David Baker in Spaceflight magazine entitled "Sex and health in space" I think it may have been a useful study.

Robonaut
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posted 04-15-2015 05:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robonaut   Click Here to Email Robonaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A problem for any female contender for the near-year long flight is that their allowed radiation exposure limits are less than for men. Peggy Whitson was interested in flying the mission but was ruled out because her cumulative exposure level would have exceeded her allowance. I think it would be reasonable to say she was not best pleased by the decision.

Tykeanaut
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posted 04-15-2015 04:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Interesting, so a potential long duration mission to Mars would not include women astronauts?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-15-2015 04:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is potentially the first of several yearlong missions on the space station. The candidates for this first expedition had to meet several baseline requirements, including a similar amount of past time spent in space.

Both Scott Kelly and Mikhail Kornienko had about 180 days of previous spaceflight experience. Peggy Whitson, who reportedly was interested in a yearlong mission, has already spent more than a year in space (cumulatively over her two flights). Gennady Padalka was also interested in the yearlong assignment, but was turned away for similar reasons.

Just because this first mission doesn't include a woman doesn't mean that a future mission won't, whether that is another yearlong stay on the station or a trip out to Mars.

OV-105
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posted 04-15-2015 06:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for OV-105   Click Here to Email OV-105     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I wonder how much having a twin on earth helped get Scott Kelly picked for the mission. You have a perfect control subject on planet to compare to the one in orbit.

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Time magazine is producing a multi-part documentary film titled "A Year in Space" that will be presented on its website starting in May.

The preview looks very well done!

Tykeanaut
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posted 04-18-2015 12:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robonaut:
A problem for any female contender for the near-year long flight is that their allowed radiation exposure limits are less than for men.
It was the radiation issue that interested me. Would a female astronaut be okay on a trip to Mars if their threshold is apparently less?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-18-2015 12:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I believe it would depend on the particular astronaut's past spaceflight experience (i.e. how much time they've already spent off Earth) and the levels of acceptable exposure as understood at the time (currently NASA's restrictions are much more conservative than Russia's, to no reported/apparent ill effect to the cosmonauts).

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 09-15-2015 12:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
They are spending 342 days in space to gather data about how their bodies react and adapt to long duration spaceflight in preparation for sending astronauts further out into the solar system.
So the two will be short of a full year by 20-odd days. Interestingly, had things gone wrong on STS-135 and the crew forced to shelter on ISS, Doug Hurley would have been the last to come home via Soyuz, after spending about 340 days in space — he would have inadvertently been the first Year in Space study for the U.S.

dabolton
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posted 02-26-2016 01:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dabolton     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has Scott Kelly announced if he will retire from NASA after this or does he intend on returning to space again someday?

Robonaut
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posted 02-26-2016 04:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robonaut   Click Here to Email Robonaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have not seen anything official but I doubt that Scott Kelly will put himself forward for another spaceflight.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-29-2016 11:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Jim Lovell says Scott Kelly's year-long sojourn in space may help us get to Mars in a column for USA Today.
One of our countrymen has spent nearly a year off of our planet.

This past year, astronaut Scott Kelly has orbited our planet more than 5,000 times, traveling well over 100 million miles aboard the International Space Station.

For a year, Scott has made an incredible sacrifice for our country as he has lived cut off from his family and friends and risked his life in the name of space medical science. He is building a foundation for the next chapter of American space flight. And Scott deserves our thanks.

oly
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posted 03-02-2016 01:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am glad to see Kelly and Kornienko return safely to earth. They have made an astonishing contribution to spaceflight and I hope their efforts reveal important research results that enable greater duration safe spaceflight possible.

Some of the contributions Kelly has made with his photography skills, his social media contributions and his humour have had public interest and opinion regarding spaceflight shown in a positive light.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-02-2016 09:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Post-flight interviews with Scott Kelly and Mikhail Kornienko:

David C
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posted 03-02-2016 05:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by oly:
I am glad to see Kelly and Kornienko return safely to earth. They have made an astonishing contribution to spaceflight...
I too am glad to see their safe return and I admire the personal sacrifice and strength required to achieve this. I'm sure the medics and engineers will have acquired much valuable data.

However, I'm far from astonished. Over seventeen years ago Titov and Manarov completed a full (not PR approximation) year in orbit and this is no where near the endurance record. I'll really start to cheer when a male and female complete a stay equivalent to a Mars round trip endurance.

I see this as an ISS "warm up."

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-02-2016 05:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The point of the yearlong mission was to see if there were any notable medical changes or surprises from what has been well-documented on six month flights. If there were none, then there may not be a point to another yearlong space station stay, let alone an even longer one.

As for the psychological challenges, as Kelly pointed out during the mission, there is a difference between orbiting the Earth for a year and having the expectation of arriving at Mars or returning to Earth to keep one motivated.

As an aside, medically and psychologically, there is little difference between 340 and 365 days.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-03-2016 04:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Scott Kelly's homecoming to Houston:

oly
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posted 03-03-2016 06:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sorry to be off topic here, the aircraft in this video, N992NA is NASA GIII Gulfstream, what is up with the engine nacelles? Is this a special modification?

GACspaceguy
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posted 03-03-2016 08:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Those are Hush Kits. They appear to be the QS3 version by Hubbard Technologies.

They are now required in the USA to meet Stage 3 noise regulations.

There are currently two companies that install Hush Kits on GII/III /IIB aircraft Hubbard and Quite Technology Aerospace (QTA).

David C
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posted 03-03-2016 11:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
If there were none, then there may not be a point to another yearlong space station stay, let alone an even longer one.
I realise that at some stage in the future of long range exploration, preparatory Earth orbital endurance demonstrations will become impractical. However, so far only four men and no women have spent more than a year continuously in microgravity. A Mars trip could easily require three years (particularly if an abort profile precluded any intermediate stay on Mars) - with no prospect of a quick return in a medical emergency. I'd be surprised if any suggested medical consensus that the assessment of two males over eleven months is sufficient to clear males and females for three years was motivated by anything other than expediency.

Finding suitable volunteers is another question entirely. A certain level of supplementary financial compensation for the hardship and sacrifice experienced by both the subjects and their families may be appropriate.

quote:
As an aside, medically and psychologically, there is little difference between 340 and 365 days.
I concede that based on a tiny sample that's probably the case physiologically. Psychologically I'm sure that depends entirely upon the situation and individual.


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