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  STS-131: Viewing, questions, and comments (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   STS-131: Viewing, questions, and comments
Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2010 10:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
STS-131: mission viewing, questions, comments
This thread is intended for comments and questions regarding the STS-131 mission and the reports published as part of collectSPACE's Flight Day Journal.

Space shuttle Discovery's crew will deliver the multi-purpose logistics module Leonardo filled with science racks to be transferred to the International Space Station.

Henry Heatherbank
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posted 04-05-2010 05:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Henry Heatherbank     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anybody else notice an awful lot of stuff coming off the ET during 131's launch a few moments ago? Higher altitude stuff, but still not something I have seen before.

KSCartist
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posted 04-05-2010 05:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
STS-131 mission specialists Stephanie Wilson, Dorothy (Dottie) Metcalf-Lindenburger and Naoko Yamazaki will tie the record for the most women aboard a space shuttle mission: three.
I can think of a number of flights that had two women, but what other shuttle crew had three?

Rick Mulheirn
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posted 04-05-2010 05:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Mulheirn   Click Here to Email Rick Mulheirn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Henry Heatherbank:
Higher altitude stuff, but still not something I have seen before.
I think the visibility of debris from the tank was accentuated by the lighting conditions at the time.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-05-2010 05:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by KSCartist:
what other shuttle crew had three?
STS-40 (Jernigan, Seddon, Hughes-Fulford) and STS-96 (Jernigan, Ochoa, Payette).

GACspaceguy
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posted 04-05-2010 06:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We had to cancel out trip to KSC this weekend due to a work issue but saw a great launch from our front porch here in Guyton, Georgia (that was after seeing the ISS fly over 15 min earlier). Go Discovery!

Henry Heatherbank
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posted 04-05-2010 06:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Henry Heatherbank     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rick Mulheirn:
I think the visibility of debris from the tank was accentuated by the lighting conditions at the time.
Ice? Tyvek? Or worse, small foam shedding? The debris at ET sep. suggests ice at the aft of the vehicle.

issman1
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posted 04-05-2010 08:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I heard NASA TV state that STS-131 is the last time rookies will fly on the shuttle.

But if STS-135 is approved, as seems likely, what are the prospects for the unflown Yvonne Cagle?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-05-2010 08:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by issman1:
...what are the prospects for the unflown Yvonne Cagle?
Although still a member of the astronaut office, Cagle is not on flight status and therefore is not eligible to be assigned to a mission.

Blackarrow
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posted 04-05-2010 03:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I watched the launch live on CNN and was surprised to see what looked like a night launch rather than a "pre-dawn" launch. I saw no evidence of any sunlight illuminating the SRB smoke-trail. For anyone lucky enough to see the launch from the ground, were there any dawn lighting effects? Anyone got any pictures to show what it was like?

Tom
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posted 04-05-2010 03:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by KSCartist:
what other shuttle crew had three?
Also, with three female crew members on Discovery and one aboard ISS, I believe this is the first time four women have been in orbit at the same time.

Tykeanaut
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posted 04-05-2010 03:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I must confess that I didn't know what time the lift-off was scheduled for on this occasion. I've never viewed one like this before. I was on the static rower at the gym when it came on SkyNews. That awesome sight made me row faster than ever!!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-05-2010 04:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Blackarrow:
For anyone lucky enough to see the launch from the ground, were there any dawn lighting effects?
It was still dark at launch time, although the sky was more purple than black as a result the rising sun, still below the horizon.

As the orbiter climbed, its plume eventually was high enough to intersect the sun's rays, which lit it up.

Unfortunately, you loose the distinct shades of the sky to the sheer brightness of the flame when trying to capture the scene on film.

johnraiders
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posted 04-05-2010 04:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for johnraiders   Click Here to Email johnraiders     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It was really a night launch, slight darkness was taken off but not much. Vapor trail got illuminated by sun a few minutes after STS-131 was out of sight.

We did clearly see the ISS fly overhead.

Ken Havekotte
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posted 04-05-2010 04:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
About 15 minutes before Discovery's liftoff, the ISS was zooming overhead us at press site 39 as a bright "star." As the orbiting outpost was trailing off to the east overhead the shuttle launch pad, the space station seemed to intercept, or "hit," for a brief second or two a beautiful half-crescent moon in the night-time sky. In witnessing and covering all the shuttle/ISS takeoffs from the shuttle press site, this was a first in my career. It was awesome!

mjanovec
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posted 04-05-2010 05:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The launch was beautiful and certainly the weather was more than comfortable for those of us viewing it in person. You couldn't have asked for a better evening.

I've seen the ISS many times, but it was extra special to watch it pass over KSC just before the launch.

The exhaust cloud about 30 minutes after launch was also quite spectacular, with shades of many colors illuminated by the sun.

Donald
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posted 04-06-2010 01:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Donald   Click Here to Email Donald     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Would there be any pictures of the launch of STS-131 from the ISS in as much that the ISS was over KSC at launch time?

ilbasso
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posted 04-06-2010 02:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The ISS passed over KSC about 6:06 a.m. By the time of the STS-131 launch at 6:21, the ISS was over the southwest tip of Ireland, and KSC was below its horizon.

Ben
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posted 04-06-2010 08:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The launch definitely took place into a deep blue eastern sky and looked a bit like this to the naked eye yesterday. And a couple of minutes later.

Lou Chinal
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posted 04-06-2010 08:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lou Chinal   Click Here to Email Lou Chinal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ben, I'm jealous!

Jay Chladek
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posted 04-07-2010 02:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just got back from Florida this evening. I must say, that was quite a fun experience. I was at the press site, covering this for my book research and Nebraska Press Association and I managed to get some good photos (I'll upload some later today).

The experience was incredible. I was there for the ISS pass over where it "hit" the moon and the shuttle's "sunrise" a few minutes later. Indeed the sky had more a purplish tone, but the brightness of the SRB plumes indeed cancelled it out. The sunlight traces became visible on the stack at about 1:35 into the flight, so they didn't illuminate the acid clouds too much. But, the cool bit was after SRB jettison when the shuttle was on the SSMEs, there was a distinct wide halo around the craft. It was something I had never seen before and was likely SSME plume exhaust reflected by the sunlight that high up. On other night launches, it can't be seen. On daylight launches, the blue sky makes it invisible as well. I will take away quite a nice memory of that. The shuttle itself was visible until about 7 minutes into the flight when it dropped below a cloud just above the horizon.

On early Tuesday morning, I went outside the hotel room for a few minutes and caught the ISS traveling over the area for a four minute viewing. It was followed by Discovery about two minutes later and both were briefly visible in the sky at once. It was quite the sight and an excellent visual end to my trip. Although I will likely never see another shuttle launch up close and personal again, memories of this one and STS-121 will last a lifetime.

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posted 04-07-2010 03:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AeroSPACE   Click Here to Email AeroSPACE     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I had the opportunity to take my son to KSC for the launch of STS-131 as a 7th birthday surprise and view Discovery's launch from the VIP guest viewing area. The experience is beyond simple words!

After the shuttle was well on it's way the remaining exhaust plume left a peculiar sight in the sky. A heart-shaped portion of the plume, lit by the sun (still beyond the horizon) caught our eyes. The photos are attached as I have titled them "Discovery's Heart." Somewhat symbolic? Maybe. Some will tell you it formed because of the light winds at launch time. but with the scheduled end of the shuttle program nearing, this could be seen as a fatefully poetic return gesture from the veteran orbiter to the throngs of supporters that filled the space coast early Monday morning for 30 years of undying love and support.

America can't allow the U.S. manned space flight program to disappear or take a back seat to any other nation. We have been at the forefront since the beginning and we've opened too many doors to start shutting them. This is the time in which we must continue to move forward rather than scale down the program. America can use this program as a rallying point, not only for industry, but for "The People" too.

Not to make this too political, but NASA deserves much more budget support than a majority of the wasteful programs being implemented these days. The spin-offs and benefits are too valuable to ignore.

In addition to being a father of four, airline pilot and very strong supporter of NASA's human space flight program, I am also a 2012 U.S. Senate candidate from Ohio. Should I get elected I plan on continuing my full support of NASA and the human space flight program.

Capt. Rusty Bliss

Blackarrow
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posted 04-08-2010 08:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wow! Those pictures bring back happy memories of STS-117 in June, 2007, particularly the smoke-trails after launch. In 2007, Atlantis also left a twisted pattern of smoke-trails in the darkening sky, including a distinct "heart." I don't have a degree in advanced computer science so I can't attach a picture, but I've just checked and if you Google "STS-117" and "smoke-trails" you ought to be able to find something.

Lunar rock nut
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posted 04-09-2010 07:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lunar rock nut   Click Here to Email Lunar rock nut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Go Captain Bliss if I lived in Ohio you would have just nailed my vote!

drjeffbang
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posted 04-09-2010 07:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for drjeffbang   Click Here to Email drjeffbang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The family and I watched from the Visitors Complex. We must have watched the exhaust plume for almost an hour!

What an incredible launch!

This was our 3rd launch viewing and the best one yet. We were a little sad leaving Florida this time because it is most likely the last launch trip we'll be able to make.

Nice pictures Capt. Bliss.

mercnvenus
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posted 04-09-2010 08:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mercnvenus   Click Here to Email mercnvenus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Our family had an awesome experience. A shuttle launch is very much worth the effort. During the wait, I kept wondering about the crowd around me. I'm sure there had to be other cSers nearby (next green belt south of Space Park on the river). I was also surprised at the international flavor of the event with the different foreign languages I could make out.

My thanks to Robert and all the wonderful members for the helpful tips and information.

music_space
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posted 04-12-2010 10:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In this video excerpt, see and hear Naoko Yamazaki, STS-131 crewwoman, and ISS crewman Soichi Noguchi play traditional Japanese instruments Koto (plucked strings) and Shakuhachi (bamboo flute).

------------------
Francois Guay
Collector of litterature, notebooks, equipment and memories!

blue_eyes
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posted 04-13-2010 01:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for blue_eyes   Click Here to Email blue_eyes     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That video excerpt was very cool! They played a piece together that's very representative of Japan, very recognizable too--it's called "Sakura" or sometimes "Sakura Sakura." The song is about springtime and the blooming of the cherry blossoms. Very nice performance (and pollen-free!).

KSCartist
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posted 04-15-2010 08:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From the STS-131 Flight Day Journal:
Today is the birthday for two space station crew members: Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi is now 45 and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko is 50.
Today astronaut John Phillips is 59 and five years ago he launched with Sergei Krikalev to begin the Expedition 11 mission. That launch also made my life-long dream come true when the wore a crew patch that I designed.

heng44
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posted 04-15-2010 08:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Happy Anniversary Tim!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-17-2010 11:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Heads up (literally)...

Space shuttle Discovery's flight path home to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Monday will take it over the continental United States. If cleared for its first opportunity (beginning with a deorbit burn at 7:43 a.m. EDT), then viewers west of Tennessee along its flight path should be able to see it blazing an ion trail across the sky.

    1st opportunity to KSC, Orbit 222:


  • South of the Queen Charlotte Islands (western Canada)
  • Over British Columbia, northeast of Vancouver
  • Over southern Alberta province
  • Over Montana, flying over Fort Peck Lake (Mach 22)
  • Across the western border of North Dakota, then over northern South Dakota tracking northwest to southeast, directly over the capital of Pierre
  • Across Iowa directly over Sioux City and southwest of Des Moines and Council Bluffs, Iowa (Mach 18)
  • Over the heart of Missouri, between Kansas City and St. Louis (Mach 16)
  • Over the eastern border of Arkansas and Tennessee, east of Memphis (Mach 14)
  • Over NE Mississippi, northeast of Tupelo (Mach 12)
  • Over Alabama tracking northwest to southeast from Birmingham to Columbus, Georgia (Mach 10)
  • Over southwest Georgia south of Americus
  • Over Florida, almost directly over Jacksonville (Mach 4)
  • West of St. Augustine and Daytona Beach, onto KSC

    2nd opportunity to KSC, Orbit 223:


  • Over Washington State, south of the Seattle/Tacoma area
  • Over northeast Oregon south of La Grande
  • Over Idaho, moving from northwest to southeast, flying north-northeast of Boise moving toward Pocatello
  • Over southwest Wyoming, north of Rock Springs (Mach 22)
  • Over Colorado, northeast of Denver (Mach 20)
  • Over Kansas, northeast of Dodge City, then almost directly over Wichita
  • Over Oklahoma, almost directly over Tulsa (Mach 18)
  • Over Arkansas, near Ft. Smith and Little Rock (Mach 16)
  • Over Mississippi, tracking over Grenada and Starkville (Mach 14)
  • Over Alabama, moving northwest to southeast over Tuscaloosa and Montgomery (Mach 10)
  • Over southwest Georgia, near Thomasville
  • Over Florida, south of Tallahassee (Mach 6)
  • South of Ocala, then over Orlando, onto KSC

Jay Chladek
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posted 04-18-2010 04:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for posting these flight tracks Robert. It looks like I won't need to go very far to see this one come in compared to STS-120. But, I do see a little bit of map difference between the color map and the black and white ground track map (both from NASA's website) which has the shuttle coming in a little to the south of Omaha rather then to the north of it. As such, I am a little curious as to which one is more accurate.

They also did goof with one bit. If it comes over west of Des Moines, then it will be east of Council Bluffs (more north east actually), not west.

Even if Discovery isn't visible, it will most certainly provide an audiable sonic boom. When I tried to watch STS-120 coming in west of Lincoln, I heard the rumble of a boom and it could be heard as far east as Omaha (the flight track had it going over Topeka, KS to the south). When I met up with Pam Melroy about a year later, I compared notes and she said her and a few other shuttle commanders had a discussion about how far west and high a sonic boom could be heard. She said to that point I was the furthest west of anyone who said they heard a sonic boom from a returning shuttle.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-18-2010 11:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Because NASA's Skywatch mini-app uses the latest tracking data from Mission Control, it can predict shuttle sighting opportunities that are racing overhead during landing.

To use Skywatch:

  • Click on "Start Applet";
  • Next, under "Satellite," select the landing opportunity orbit number (e.g. first landing opp on Monday at Kennedy Space Center is "KSC222 (ENTRY)";
  • Then select your city from the list, or select your zip code, or zoom in by clicking on the map of your state.

tegwilym
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posted 04-19-2010 02:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bummer on the flyby. We had clear skies in Seattle this morning, wasn't supposed to be clear either. Rain is supposed to finally come this afternoon, tomorrow will be worse here. I think the passes were even lower tomorrow assuming it lands in FL.

issman1
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posted 04-19-2010 11:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tegwilym:
Bummer on the flyby.

Due to that 24-hour postponement, I was able to observe Discovery pass over my location in central England half-an-hour before local sunrise (4.30am).

What particularly impressed me was how bright the shuttle appeared in the clear sky. Could it been due to its low altitude? It was almost as bright as the ISS which followed two minutes after Discovery disappeared into the eastern horizon.

It was also amazing to think that just a few hours later Discovery (and crew) would be back on the Earth.

spaceman1953
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posted 04-20-2010 04:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceman1953   Click Here to Email spaceman1953     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Local weather TV people are saying that there is a REASONABLE chance here in Indiana that we could see the Shuttle on its' landing approach this morning looking to the SOUTHWEST, and they have almost PROMISED that we will hear two sonic booms.

This could be a spectacular morning in Indiana....

MarylandSpace
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posted 04-20-2010 08:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MarylandSpace   Click Here to Email MarylandSpace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What a beautiful sight on NASA TV -- the landing -- this morning. The launch, the mission, and the landing never cease to amaze me.

paulushumungus
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posted 04-20-2010 02:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for paulushumungus   Click Here to Email paulushumungus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just came back from seeing the shuttle land at Kennedy Space Centre. The sonic boom was amazing. I wasn't prepared for the noise (I s*** my pants).

Atlantis rolls out at 6pm tonight so may go back to see that and there's an Atlas 2 launch tomorrow. I'm staying here forever!!!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-20-2010 02:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by paulushumungus:
...there's an Atlas 2 launch tomorrow. I'm staying here forever!!!
Maybe not forever, but if you want to catch that Atlas V launch, its been postponed until Thursday.

blacklion1
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posted 04-21-2010 06:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for blacklion1   Click Here to Email blacklion1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is for anyone who was at KSC for the landing yesterday. On NASA TV, the landing looked a little long down the runway. Can anyone say if this was true or not or unusual? If true, was it owed to the descending node flight path across the US?


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