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  STS-116: Solar Array Wing Retraction (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   STS-116: Solar Array Wing Retraction
Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-13-2006 02:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From NASA:
quote:
The first step in STS-116’s challenging job of rerouting power aboard the International Space Station is under way as the left wing of the solar array on the station's P6 truss has begun to slowly retract and fold up. The retraction began at 1:28 p.m. EST.

The folding of this 115-foot long solar array, which has been unfurled for more than 6 years, will permit the activation of a rotary joint on the P4 truss. The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint, or SARJ, enables the solar arrays on the P4 to follow the sun as the station moves through orbital sunrise and sunset.


Unfortunately, the first few tries to retract the array did not go smoothly:

By the fourth attempt, the outlook was looking better and retraction continued for a solid three minutes:

Upon hearing from STS-116/Expedition 14 crew member Sunita Williams that the retraction was going smoothly, capcom Terry Virts replied from Mission Control: "That's good news. You've got a bunch of guys about to turn blue here..."

Retraction has been halted again, as guide wires were seen going slack and an orbital sunset is approaching.

The array needed to be retracted at least 40 percent to provide enough clearance for activation of the P4 rotary joint. The crew reported 17.5 "bays" (sections) of the array are still to be retracted, which is slightly more than the 40 percent needed.

NASA is now considering how to proceed as they await the next orbital sunrise in about 30 minutes.

The P6 array is 110 feet by 38 feet wide. It consists of two array blankets that are covered with solar cells. The structure is extended or retracted by a telescopic mast which is located between the two blankets (source: SpaceflightNow.com).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-13-2006 03:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Picking up after another orbital sunrise, the STS-116 crew re-deployed the array out to 19 bays (two more bays than it was retracted before sunset but within the 40 percent needed to rotate the SARJ) in an attempt to clear the "waviness" from one of the blankets and then began retracting one bay at a time. This step by step approach was in hopes of keeping the guide wires taut and the array folding as it should. Unfortunately, after a couple of attempts extending out to 19 and retracting to 17-17.5, they are consistently seeing the same problem.

The crew and ground are now troubleshooting the issue before proceeding further.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-13-2006 04:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We are now up to 24 attempts to retract the array.

There appears to be two problems encountered: either the array experiences a slack in its guide wire (as mentioned above) or the blanket folds incorrectly, as Mark Polansky described earlier:

quote:
The best analogy we can give is probably what we've been using both here and on the ground is it's kind of like folding a map up. You have the folds in the paper, and if you start folding it and the fold is going the wrong way, you can try a little bit but there gets a point where it just bows out and there's nothing you can do other than to pop it back in place or unfold it and try again.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-13-2006 04:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As mission control and the crew of STS-116 await another orbital sunrise (in about 30 minutes), the goal for the next daylight pass is to get the array retracted under 19 bays (assuming it is not already).

The crew needs to move on to testing the rotary joint.

The plan is to extend far enough out to clear the folds (even if beyond the 19 bays) and then retract, one bay at a time.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-13-2006 05:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The retraction plan underway now (from an extension of 28 bays) is to proceed two bays at a time, making sure that the panels fold as they should upon each other and that the guide wire stays taut.

The array has been retracted back down to 17.5 bays, where the issues that were and still are a problem continue to plague the crew's and controllers' efforts to complete stowing the wing.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-13-2006 06:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
After more than 5 hours, more than 40 attempts and during their final daylight pass scheduled for today's array retraction activities, the STS-116 crew has deployed the port P6 array just enough to keep the wing rigid, with 17.5 bays remaining to be retracted and 14 safely folded and stowed.

They will now proceed to the rotary joint test as ground controllers work to resolve the issues preventing the full retraction of the array.

The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint, or SARJ, enables the solar arrays on the P4 truss to follow the sun as the station moves through orbital sunrise and sunset.

Once automatic sun tracking is confirmed for the new P4 arrays, the stage is set for the second spacewalk, scheduled to begin at 3:12 p.m. EST Thursday. Mission Specialists Bob Curbeam and Christer Fuglesang, who conducted the mission’s first spacewalk, will perform Thursday’s excursion.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-13-2006 07:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With the SARJ now rotating without problem, a decision has been made and radioed to the shuttle and station crews that tomorrow's spacewalk will proceed as originally trained for and planned.

In regards to the completing the port P6 array retraction, controllers are considering incorporating activities into the mission's third scheduled spacewalk set for Saturday or perhaps a fourth, unplanned EVA to follow.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-13-2006 08:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A good summary from NASA:
quote:
The International Space Station’s newest set of solar arrays is tracking the sun tonight, following partial retraction of a similar array that’s been the station’s primary power plant for six years. This event sets the stage for two challenging spacewalks by the STS-116 crew to rewire and reroute the station’s power system.

The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) and the new set of arrays are a part of the P3/ P4 truss segments that were installed onto the station in September during the STS-115 mission. The rotary joint enables the solar arrays to follow the sun and generate the maximum power possible. Activation of the SARJ occurred shortly before 8 p.m. EST, and a few minutes later the Mission Control Center in Houston notified the crew that the arrays were following the sun.

Throughout the day, the STS-116 crew and flight controllers worked together to solve problems that prevented the arrays from folding properly. The retraction activities of the arrays began at 1:28 p.m. More than 40 commands were sent to furl and unfurl the arrays in an attempt to properly align them. When the efforts concluded about 7:50 p.m., 13.5 of 31 bays had been folded, leaving the port arrays in a safe position that allowed the activation of the P4 rotary joint.

The crew also received word that Thursday’s spacewalk will take place as planned despite the problems retracting the P6 solar array. Mission Specialists Bob Curbeam and Christer Fuglesang, who conducted the mission’s first spacewalk, are scheduled to begin Thursday’s orbital stroll at 3:12 p.m. They will begin efforts to rewire the station, bringing power generated by the P4 arrays on line for use by the station's systems and prepare for more arrays to be added next year.

In preparation for the spacewalk, Curbeam and Fuglesang will again "campout" in the station’s airlock. The pressure will be lowered in the airlock to the pressure normally found on Earth 10,000 feet above sea level during the overnight campout. The procedure protects against decompression sickness as Curbeam and Fuglesang go to the even lower pressure of spacesuits on Thursday.


november25
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posted 12-14-2006 11:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for november25   Click Here to Email november25     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Robert- Many thanks for the great pictures of the work being done to the ISS.

It reminds me very much of the STS-61 1st Hubble repair when Story, J. Hoffman and Kathy Thornton were replacing the Solar Arrays back in 1993. These panels are useful in they generate power from the sun into electricity. On STS-61, they had a few problems.

I have been watching this via NASA TV on my computer screen-nice work.

Aztecdoug
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posted 12-14-2006 12:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Aztecdoug   Click Here to Email Aztecdoug     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Am I right in assuming that the goal is to retract the old array and bring it back with the shuttle? If so, it would make for some cool lucites!

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ejectr
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posted 12-14-2006 12:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I believe I saw it somewhere that they will be moving it to another location on the ISS in the future.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-14-2006 01:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bob (ejectr) is correct: the reason why the P6 port array was being retracted by STS-116 (and the starboard wing will be retracted by STS-117) is to prepare its move from the atop the Unity module to the P5 truss. That move could not occur until (a) STS-116 delivered and installed the P5 spacer, which they have done, and (b) power was redirected to the P4 arrays, which they are doing today and on Saturday during spacewalks. The retraction of the P6 port array was also necessary to allow the P4 joint to safely rotate so that the P4 arrays could track the Sun.

GACspaceguy
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posted 12-14-2006 01:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The sequence is as follows.

STS-116
P6 port array retraction (currently partially retracted)
STS -117
P6 port starboard array retraction
2nd Starboard truss element installed (S3/S4) and solar array deploy
STS-118
3rd Starboard truss element (S5) installed
STS-120
P6 relocation, connection to P5 and solar array deploy

Therefore this mission is the first in a sequence of missions that stows these solar arrays on P6, relocates P6 to P5 and then re-deploys the arrays again.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-15-2006 12:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Could this be the solution to fully retracting the P6 port array?

NASA thinks it may. During Leroy Chiao's stay aboard the ISS during Expedition 10, his style of exercise using the Interim Resistive Exercise Device (IRED) located in the Unity node was observed to "excite" the P6 arrays. In other words, they began to exhibit a very small wiggle.

This vibration may be just what is needed to fully retract the P6 port array. Therefore, later this morning, before 10am CST, NASA will have a member of the ISS Expedition 14 crew exercise using the IRED in a manner similar to Chiao (more of an aerobic workout rather than the typical upper body strengthening). This test will be used to determine if an attempt at fully retracting the array while a crew member exercises will be staged later on Friday.

Before anyone exercises though, NASA also plans another type of "wiggle" test by slightly moving the array's beta gimbal.

Both of these approaches are in the hope of solving the array's complete retraction without the need for a spacewalk.

Robert Pearlman
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Despite Thomas Reiter's "silver medal" efforts to exercise the kinks from the P6 array (and mission control's efforts to wiggle them out), the P6 port array remains stuck at 17.5 bays. Today's spacewalk, if running ahead of schedule, will include an opportunity for Beamer to try shaking loose the guide wire.

From NASA:

quote:
The crews of Space Shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station tried again to refold an accordion-like solar array with help from engineers and flight controllers on the ground, but none of the techniques succeeded in clearing the jam.

The final attempt of the day came at 8:04 p.m. CST when Expedition 14 Flight Engineer Sunita Williams deployed the P6 solar array blanket slightly and then retracted it the same distance. This left 14 of the array’s 31 bays in their storage box, the same condition in which they started the day.

After the deployment and retraction technique made no significant progress in clearing the jam, the team briefed the crew on an inspection task that is being planned for use at the end of the mission’s third spacewalk. The task would be added only if the rest of the electrical rewiring activities planned for the excursion go smoothly. Mission managers have not yet decided whether a fourth spacewalk will be attempted, but the inspection task on the third spacewalk could provide information valuable to those making the decision.

Earlier in the day, flight controllers “wiggled” the solar arrays using the beta gimbal assembly, a rotating mechanism on the truss, and the crew worked out vigorously on an a resistive exercise device. Both techniques were attempts to jostle the guide wires and stainless steel grommets that are believed to be the cause of the stalled retraction.

The third spacewalk is scheduled to begin at 1:37 p.m. CST Saturday. During the excursion, Mission Specialist Bob Curbeam and Williams will finish rewiring the station’s power system, stow three Service Module Debris Panel bundles, install an adjustable grapple bar and, if time permits, troubleshoot the problem with the stuck array. The spacewalk will be Williams’ first.


Robert Pearlman
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The Mission Management Team today approved a fourth spacewalk for Discovery's crew on Monday to attempt to retract the balky P6 port solar array. Barring an earlier retraction of the array, the spacewalk Monday moves Discovery's undocking to Tuesday, late inspection of the shuttle's heat shield to Wednesday and landing to Friday.

Robert Pearlman
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Having concluded STS-116's efforts to rewire the space station's electrical systems and having accomplished the other tasks scheduled for STS-116's third EVA, mission specialist Bob Curbeam and Expedition 14 flight engineer Sunita Williams have ascended the P6 truss where Beamer is pushing on the box into which the P6 port array folds.

The hope is to ease tension in apparently misaligned guide wires, which could lead to an additional attempt to retract the array.

Beamer's "shake" hasn't been completely successful, but has freed what were stuck "grommets" — rings through which the guide wire passes — and as a result, the ground is now considering an attempt to retract the array while Beamer shakes during the next day pass.

Robert Pearlman
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The "Beamer Shake" freed the stuck grommets that prevented the P6 array from retracting beyond 17.5 bays and after one additional shake, the array was retracted by another bay.

That was followed by a succession of shakes and retractions, stopping as necessary when it appeared to either Beamer or Suni that the grommets or guide wires were in danger of (or were) snagging again. Eventually, it became necessary for Suni to also take turns at shaking the array from her side.

Beamer shook the array wing 13 times and Suni 19 times.

Beamer's and Suni's shakes resulted in successfully retracting 6.5 more bays, leaving only 11 bays (35%) to be retracted during a spacewalk on Monday.

divemaster
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posted 12-16-2006 09:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
another perfect example of why you can't send a robot to the job of a human in spaceflight


However, I wish both of them had a "big stick" with them to knock the guide wire

MCroft04
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posted 12-16-2006 09:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It sure looked like Beamer and Suni were having a great time, and working hard even though more work is required. I thought it was interesting when it was suggested that Beamer and Suni trade places. After more discussion, everyone agreed that Suni was doing just as good a job as Beamer.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-16-2006 09:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by divemaster:
However, I wish both of them had a "big stick" with them to knock the guide wire
Though not quite the Inanimate Carbon Rod of fame, they'll have just such a stick on Monday. Kirk Shireman, deputy ISS manager, told collectSPACE during last night's mission briefing that the crew will be using Sunday to prepare tools to nudge the arrays, as and if necessary. The preparation mostly consists of using kapton tape to cover existing tools such that it helps insulate against the charged arrays arcing electricity.

Robert Pearlman
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On Monday, Bob "Beamer" Curbeam — making a record fourth EVA during a single shuttle mission — and first Swede in space Christer Fuglesang will attempt to fully retract the remaining 11 bays on the P6 port solar array on the International Space Station.

The Beamer Shake that was successful during the third spacewalk on Friday will be replaced by the Beamer pull, flip and push as he uses tools to pull guide wires, flip grommets and push panel hinges. (If necessary, the spacewalkers will again shake the panel.)

Plans call for Curbeam to work from the end of the station’s Canadarm2 to reach specific areas of the solar array. From the arm, Curbeam can use Kapton tape-insulated tools, including a scraper, needle-nose pliers and an extended bail puller to free up the array for retraction.

Fuglesang will work from the truss to assist Curbeam and shake the solar array, as was done in Saturday’s spacewalk, if needed. He will also take photographs of the solar array wing on the other side of the truss to document its configuration before its retraction on the next joint shuttle and station mission.

Astronauts Suni Williams and Joan Higginbotham will operate the station’s robotic arm during the spacewalk. Pilot Bill Oefelein will serve as the spacewalk coordinator.

Monday’s spacewalk is set to begin at 1:12 p.m. CST. The team has allotted six hours and 30 minutes for the spacewalk, but hopes to have the work completed in about four hours and 30 minutes.

KSCartist
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posted 12-18-2006 05:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Robert-

Am I correct in assuming that the reason they can just "poke the folds" with their gloved hands as the array retracts is because of electrical shock?

I hope the 117 crew is already practicing the 4th EVA techniques for March.

Tim

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-18-2006 08:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by KSCartist:
Am I correct in assuming that the reason they can just "poke the folds" with their gloved hands as the array retracts is because of electrical shock?
Yes, and it is the same reason that the tools were prepared for this spacewalk by wrapping them with kapton tape.
quote:
I hope the 117 crew is already practicing the 4th EVA techniques for March.
Indeed, and as mentioned above, Fuglesang will take the opportunity during today's spacewalk to photograph the starboard P6 array to collect additional information that might be of value to the STS-117 crew while preparing for its retraction during their mission.

KenDavis
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posted 12-18-2006 01:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KenDavis   Click Here to Email KenDavis     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great to see another record broken as Bob Curbeam amakes a 4th spacewalk on the same mission, but I was wondering why NASA didn't fly 4 spacewalking MSs and alternate the spacewalkers (as with Hubble missions)?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-18-2006 01:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by KenDavis:
I was wondering why NASA didn't fly 4 spacewalking MSs and alternate the spacewalkers (as with Hubble missions)?
I believe it was a combination of transfer requirements (astronauts needed to move supplies from Discovery to ISS and back) and that only three EVAs were planned. Originally, the mission's spacewalkers were only Beamer and Christer, but it was decided that it would be a good idea to give Suni some EVA experience before she began her six-month stay, thus she was assigned one of the spacewalks.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-18-2006 02:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
STS-116's fourth spacewalk kicked off at 1 p.m. CST.

After making his way to the P6 array and climbing into a foot restraint at the end of the station's arm, Beamer began his first inspection of the port solar wing. His discovery: a fray in the guide wire.

Using the scraper tool, Beamer was able to flip the grommets past the fray, clearing the way for the first retraction attempt during this EVA.

Movement began and ended quickly as one bay retracted however, as Beamer spotted a snagged grommet. To free the guide wire, Christer is shaking the array in a move similar to that conducted by Beamer and Suni during the third spacewalk.

Robert Pearlman
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Christer's attempts to shake the guide wire taut were unsuccessful.

Bringing in Beamer for a closer look revealed that the wire was not caught on any grommet but rather the pulley and reel into which the wire recedes.

Ground controllers had Beamer try to pull on the wire with needle nose pliers to see if the reel would catch and pull in the slack. Instead, the wire became even more unfurled.

Two hours and 14 minutes into the EVA, Beamer's rank has raised from #13 at the start of the spacewalk to #9 on the career time EVA list. Fuglesang is #78.

Robert Pearlman
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After pausing to reconsider the situation, another attempt by Beamer at pulling the guide wire with the needle nose pliers was successful and the wire receded into the take-up reel at the base of the array's blanket (panel) box.

Beamer was moved away to begin retracting the array. Motion however, had to be stopped due to a stuck grommet and Christer moved in for a successful shake.

Two bays have been retracted thus far in the spacewalk, leaving just nine to go.

Robert Pearlman
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Retractions and shakes continue, with Christer moving from side to side of the array mast to assert pressure where needed.

Nearly two more bays have been retracted.

Robert Pearlman
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Approaching four hours into the spacewalk...

By ground controllers' estimates, four bays are all that remain to have the P6 port array fully retracted. The plan is to continue to retract one bay at a time until only one bay remains exposed and then if all looks good, to continue to a full stowed position.

Robert Pearlman
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Only one bay remaining:

The spacewalkers, astronauts inside Discovery, the station crew, and ground controllers are now visually inspecting the folded array panels to check that they are lined up and that the latches are in position before retracting the final bay.

Beamer is now the 6th most experienced spacewalker as ranked by career EVA time.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-18-2006 05:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Full retraction!

Robert Pearlman
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Though the arrays are retracted, Beamer has spotted a guide wire slightly sticking out (left, center photo above) of the blanket box.

By pulling on it, Beamer was able to furl the errant wire.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-18-2006 06:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The blanket boxes are now latched and the P6 port array is now officially retracted!

The final bay was folded about 5:53 p.m. CST.

Bob Curbeam is now ranked #5 on the list of spacewalkers by time spent outside. The top 10 list is now:

  1. Anatoly Solovyev
  2. Jerry Ross
  3. Steve Smith
  4. Joe Tanner
  5. Bob Curbeam
  6. Nikolai Budarin
  7. Jim Newman
  8. Yuri Onufriyenko
  9. Talgat Musbayev
  10. Piers Sellers

Larry McGlynn
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posted 12-18-2006 06:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What a fantastic EVA!

Humans are learning to do construction in space. Think of how this EVA will help as Man has to dock and manuver multi vehicles in LEO prior to heading for the Moon or Mars.

Larry McGlynn

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posted 12-18-2006 07:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Bob Curbeam is now ranked #5 on the list of spacewalkers by time spent outside.

Is there an official list kept somewhere that includes the times spent outside? Also, does it include lunar EVAs too?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-18-2006 08:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mjanovec:
Is there an official list kept somewhere that includes the times spent outside? Also, does it include lunar EVAs too?
There is a NASA maintained list but it is not online. Its a spreadsheet they update after each mission. And yes, it does include the 15 lunar EVAs (including the one stand-up on A15).

Bill Harwood maintains an EVA stats page on CBS's website that includes the top 30 and is up-to-date through today's EVA.

bruce
Member

Posts: 830
From: Fort Mill, SC, USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 12-18-2006 08:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bruce   Click Here to Email bruce     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Robert,

Those screen shots are just incredible - thanks for posting them along with your comments! This EVA has been one of the most exciting and promising things we've seen from humans in space in a while. From Conrad & Kerwin's "just do it!" efforts on the Skylab solar shield to the Hubble repair missions and now this, I think Larry's comments are absolutely correct about the human presence in space exploration.

Wow!
Bruce

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-19-2006 12:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
At Monday evening's briefing, STS-116 lead EVA officer Tricia Mack shared the with the media the four tools that were modified by the crew for Beamer to use while manipulating the P6 port array. They were: a scraper, needle nose pliers, a loop pin puller and a cheater bar with attached bail lever, all of which were covered with kapton tape:

All of these were used to insure that the array's guide wires were not being snagged by grommets. A grommet, with guide wire passing through, is pictured here:


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