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  Space exploration history trivia questions (Page 4)

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Author Topic:   Space exploration history trivia questions
garymilgrom
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posted 10-12-2012 08:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think the first telecom satellite was Telstar. Don't know the other answers.

garymilgrom
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posted 10-12-2012 11:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The first satellite television signal was relayed from Europe to the Telstar satellite over North America in 1962.

Telstar 1 relayed its first, and non-public, television pictures—a flag outside Andover Earth Station—to Pleumeur-Bodou on July 11, 1962. Almost two weeks later, on July 23, at 3:00 p.m. EDT, it relayed the first publicly available live transatlantic television signal. The broadcast was made possible in Europe by Eurovision and in North America by NBC, CBS, ABC, and the CBC. The first public broadcast featured CBS's Walter Cronkite and NBC's Chet Huntley in New York, and the BBC's Richard Dimbleby in Brussels. The first pictures were the Statue of Liberty in New York and the Eiffel Tower in Paris.

moorouge
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posted 10-12-2012 03:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by moorouge:
Talking about telecommunications - when was the first broadcast made from space using which satellite and who made it?
Not Telstar. The first broadcast made from space was on or shortly after 18th December 1958 by the Score satellite. It consisted of a brief, pre-recorded Christmas message by President Eisenhower and was made using an onboard tape recorder.

The first active message was made on 4th October 1960 using the Courier 1B satellite. A message, again by President Eisenhower, was transmitted from the Deal Test Site and received by a ground station in Puerto Rico.

Philip
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posted 10-16-2012 10:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Philip:
Which was the first 100% commercially sponsored manned space mission?
Japanese cosmonaut Toyohiro Akiyama during Soyuz TM-11 to the MIR space station in December 1990.

He flew as a reporter/space tourist for the Japanese television network TBS. His female back-up was Ryoko Kikuchi and on launch day, STS-35 was launched as well!

LM-12
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posted 12-01-2012 09:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by LM-12:
Which NASA astronauts made their rookie flights in Russian spacecraft?

  • Michael Fincke (TMA-4)
  • Michael Barratt (TMA-14)
  • Timothy Creamer (TMA-17)
  • Shannon Walker (TMA-19)

  • Philip
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    posted 12-08-2012 09:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Were the Gemini spacecraft launched without a launch abort system - escape tower?

    tegwilym
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    posted 12-10-2012 03:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    quote:
    Originally posted by Philip:
    Were the Gemini spacecraft launched without a launch abort system - escape tower?
    True. They had ejection seats.

    canyon42
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    posted 01-06-2013 09:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Among the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts, Jim Lovell holds this "record." Tied for second place are Gordon Cooper and Tom Stafford. Can you figure out what the accomplishment is?

    topmiler
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    posted 01-06-2013 10:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for topmiler     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Most miles flown.

    moorouge
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    posted 01-06-2013 11:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Not most miles flown - Skylab 4 crew hold this record by a long way.

    On edit - Lovell does hold one record though it's impossible to say when he achieved it. [Clue - was on an Apollo flight]

    canyon42
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    posted 01-06-2013 02:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Nope, nothing to do with miles flown.

    One hint: in the cases of both Lovell and Stafford, it happened because of the misfortune of others. At least twice for Lovell, in fact.

    mach3valkyrie
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    posted 01-06-2013 05:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mach3valkyrie   Click Here to Email mach3valkyrie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Lovell flew the most times in place of the original crew member selected: Elliot See, Mike Collins, Alan Shepard.

    Stafford also flew because of the Gemini 9 original crew being killed.

    Am I on the right track?

    canyon42
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    posted 01-06-2013 05:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Right track, yes, sort of — in the sense that some of those things resulted in what I'm looking for. Although Shepard (and by extension Apollo 13/14) is not involved at all.

    Gonzo
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    posted 01-06-2013 06:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gonzo   Click Here to Email Gonzo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    This might be a WAG, but Lovell flew the furthest from Earth (Apollo 8). Due to it only being a lunar fly-by, I believe their lunar altitude would have been higher than those of the following missions. But like I said, it may be a WAG!

    canyon42
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    posted 01-06-2013 07:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Nope. I don't know if that's true or not as far as Apollo 8 flying the furthest from Earth, but if it was, that would mean he was tied with Borman and Anders, not by himself (and just ahead of Stafford and Cooper).

    I'll give it one more day. Last hint: you gotta think numerically and progressively. Shoot, my "hints" might just make it worse, I dunno...

    Mike Dixon
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    posted 01-06-2013 07:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Dixon   Click Here to Email Mike Dixon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    I'll give it a shot.

    There were only two missions between Cooper's first (MA-9) and second (GT-5) flights.

    There were only two missions (at least numerically) between Stafford's first (GT-6A) and second (GT-9A) flights.

    There was only one mission between Lovell's second (GT-12) and third (A-8) flights.

    I'll spit if I have this wrong.

    canyon42
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    posted 01-06-2013 08:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Cha-ching, Mike! "Shortest interval between flights in terms of intervening flights rather than time" is how I was thinking it. Your explanation is probably simpler.

    I believe Crippen equaled the only-one-flight-in-between mark during the shuttle program. No idea if anyone else did. Did anyone ever fly consecutive flights? I have some vague recollection that that might have happened, but I might be completely off about that.

    canyon42
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    posted 01-06-2013 08:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Oh, and I forgot to mention that yeah, Stafford's case is a tricky one "numerically," since Gemini 6A launched after Gemini 7. That being the case, you could argue that there was really only one mission in between Stafford's first two flights. However, it's also true that 6A came DOWN before Gemini 7, so you could also say that Gemini 7 and 8 both came "in between" 6A and 9. Whichever.

    LM-12
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    posted 01-06-2013 08:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Stephen Bowen flew consecutive shuttle flights on STS-132 and STS-133.

    Mike Dixon
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    posted 01-06-2013 08:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Dixon   Click Here to Email Mike Dixon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Great!! What did I win??

    Yep, one flight between 41C and 41G for Bob Crippen. There was also "one flight between" for Jim Halsell, Roger Crouch, Susan Still, Don Thomas, Jan Voss and Mike Gernhardt (STS-83 and the "reflown" STS-94).

    Hoot Gibson came close with two intervening flights between his assignments to STS-61C and STS-27.

    mach3valkyrie
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    posted 01-06-2013 11:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mach3valkyrie   Click Here to Email mach3valkyrie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Pinky Nelson: one flight between 61C and 26.

    MattJL
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    posted 01-06-2013 11:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MattJL   Click Here to Email MattJL     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    quote:
    Originally posted by Gonzo:
    This might be a WAG, but Lovell flew the furthest from Earth (Apollo 8).
    I think you're thinking of 13. If I recall correctly, the reason was 13 being on a free-return trajectory, so it was ~100 kilometers higher up than orbital altitude.

    moorouge
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    posted 01-07-2013 01:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    You're correct. Lovell with respective crew members can claim to have been further away from mother Earth than any other human.

    However, there is a catch. Because the distance to the Moon is constantly changing even during the course of a flight, it is almost impossible to compute the exact distance and whether he achieved this on Apollo 8 or Apollo 13.

    Couple more trivia for you. Stafford does hold one record by himself. What? And what mission holds the record for the lowest Earth orbit?

    mach3valkyrie
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    posted 01-07-2013 02:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mach3valkyrie   Click Here to Email mach3valkyrie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    I would say the most number of times an astronaut was loaded into the spacecraft awaiting launch and then had to climb out again because of a scrub. Twice for Gemini 6 and twice for Gemini 9.

    I'll guess Gemini 3 at 93 miles perigee.

    moorouge
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    posted 01-07-2013 04:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Correct for the second. For a short time on its third orbit Gemini 3 had a perigee of 83 kms.

    OK - yes, Stafford does have the distinction of being the 'elevator astronaut', but that's not what I was thinking of. The Russian equivalent of this record is Shatalov. (Always with the proviso unless someone knows better!)

    On edit - another couple of trivia for you to ponder on. What have Gemini 3 and Voskhod 1 in common beside being the first two man crews of their respective nations and what do Aurora 7 and Voskhod 1 have in common?

    Hart Sastrowardoyo
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    posted 01-07-2013 12:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Wouldn't the elevator astronaut distinction belong to Steve Hawley? By this article, Hawley recalls it happening "Something like 15 or 16 times."

    And then there's this thread. Anyone want to take a stab at listing them all? The 41-D launch abort was first. The 61-C scrub on Dec. 19 was the second, and the Jan. 6 scrub was the third. There were others, but STS-31R scrubbed at least once with the crew inside, tying Stafford.

    moorouge
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    posted 01-08-2013 04:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    quote:
    Originally posted by Hart Sastrowardoyo:
    Wouldn't the elevator astronaut distinction belong to Steve Hawley?

    How many of Steve Hawley's 15 or 16 were with him actually strapped in and ready to launch? All of Stafford's were.

    And to answer my other question about Stafford. He holds, as far as I'm aware, the shortest time between flights - just over 6 months between Gemini 6 and 9. Shatalov's Russian equivalent record is about 9 months between Soyuz 4 and 5.

    Robert Pearlman
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    posted 01-08-2013 06:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    The entire STS-83 crew flew again on STS-94 three months after landing.

    moorouge
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    posted 01-08-2013 08:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    quote:
    Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
    The entire STS-83 crew flew again on STS-94 three months after landing.

    You're quite correct Robert, though don't hold with all this modern stuff myself.

    Was 84 days between flights, though on same basic mission.

    moorouge
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    posted 01-09-2013 12:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    I suppose I'd better give the answers to my other two questions.

    Gemini 3 and Voskhod 2 besides being the first two-man craft of their respective nations are also the shortest duration missions.

    Aurora 7 and Voskhod 2 share the distinction of having the longest overshoot on a planned recovery. In the case of Aurora 7 this was some 400km long, in the case of Voskhod 2 it was one orbit and 1440km long.

    You can award yourselves a distinction grade if you spot my deliberate mistake in setting the questions and a pass mark if you learn that sometimes the obvious answers are the correct ones.

    LM-12
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    posted 02-04-2013 07:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Can you spot the mistake in this Gemini 12 photo taken at the Cape Canaveral Skid Strip?

    SpaceAholic
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    posted 02-04-2013 08:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Crews of 6 and 7 are reversed

    FullThrottle
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    posted 02-04-2013 08:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FullThrottle   Click Here to Email FullThrottle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Gemini 6 and 7 Crew members are reversed! 7 was fourteen days in the men's room flight... I bet Lovell got a good chuckle out of that one right around the time this photograph was taken! Nice picture, thanks for posting it!

    LM-12
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    posted 02-04-2013 08:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    That was an easy one. The crew names are listed in the order they launched, but the 6 and 7 numbers are not. Is that sign still around, in the KSCVC perhaps?

    Here is a wider view of that same event. http://images.ksc.nasa.gov/photos/1966/medium/KSC-66P-0559.jpg

    SkyMan1958
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    posted 11-08-2013 03:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Which cosmonaut in 1995, AFTER the collapse of the USSR, ran for the Russian Duma as a Communist Party member?

    LM-12
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    posted 11-26-2013 04:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    Which moonwalker has an identical twin brother?

    LM1
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    posted 12-31-2013 08:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM1   Click Here to Email LM1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
    quote:
    Originally posted by SkyMan1958:
    Which cosmonaut in 1995, AFTER the collapse of the USSR, ran for the Russian Duma as a Communist Party member?

    Gherman Titov per Wikipedia -

    "Following his space flight, Titov assumed various senior positions in the Soviet space programme until his retirement in 1992. In 1995, he was elected to the State Duma as a member of the Communist Party. He died of cardiac arrest in his sauna at the age of 65 in Moscow [in 2000]"


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