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  Last Titan from Cape Canaveral

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Author Topic:   Last Titan from Cape Canaveral
Ben
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From: Daytona Beach, FL
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posted 04-25-2005 09:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Cape Canaveral will host its last launch of a Titan rocket Friday, ending 50 years of history and 43 years of spaceflight that started with sending America's Gemini astronauts into space.

The Titan 4B, which will be the next to last to fly (the last will occur late this summer from Vandenberg AFB, Calif.), is to carry a classified payload into orbit for the National Reconnaissance Office.

This will also be the very last rocket of original space vehicle heritage to fly from Florida. Here is an intersting site on that (which was formerly a real website!):
http://www.geocities.com/launchreport/heritag.html

The launch may also be visible for those living along the East Coast of the US and Canada much the way Shuttle is when it heads to the ISS and Mir at night.

Given a recent dispute with Canada over whether the Titan 4's first or second stage could hit oil platforms off the coast of Newfoundland on the way up, the launch inclination is expected to be very high, near or at the 63 degree limit imposed on launches Cape Canaveral.

Having witnessed Shuttle launches from NYC before; and knowing what the first stage flame is like on Titan 4 after the SRBs separate, I would say viewers have a very good chance of seeing it (unlike the Atlas-Centaur on Feb. 3 which was a very dim flame). The first stage separates from the vehicle about 400 miles downrage and the second stage takes it the rest of the way into orbit. Both stages use the same fuel.

Launch is scheduled between 8:00 and 10:30pm EDT, with the exact launch time and window expected, as usual with classified launches, to be announced one to three days before liftoff.

For updates check the SpaceflightNow.com status later this week.


Titan was developed as an ICBM in the late 1950s as a supplement to the Atlas rocket, and first became intended for use as a space launch vehicle by NASA for the two-man Gemini launcher.

Titan was first fired on an orbital trajectory on April 8, 1964 with the unmanned Gemini 1 launch, and on March 23, 1965 launched John Young and Gus Grissom on the first manned Gemini flight. In the 40 years since then, Titan's have launched countless military payloads as well as many for NASA, having sent the Voyagers to the outer solar system, the Vikings to Mars and Cassini to Saturn. The program has had its share of failures, however, including one of the most spectacular explosions in the Cape's history on August 12, 1998.

Here is a short history:
http://www.aero.org/publications/crosslink/winter2003/07.html

------------------
-Ben

www.launchphotography.com

(edited in note about first stage sep time and second stage engine igntion).

[This message has been edited by Ben (edited April 25, 2005).]

DavidH
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posted 04-26-2005 09:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidH   Click Here to Email DavidH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Unless I'm missing something, this puts the launch during or after the AHOF Gala dinner.

Anybody planning on trying to watch?

------------------
http://allthese worlds.hatbag.net/space.php
"America's challenge of today has forged man's destiny of tomorrow." - Commander Eugene Cernan, Apollo 17 Mission, 11 December 1972

Ben
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posted 04-26-2005 10:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yep...those who will be at the Saturn V center will be six miles from pad 40, although you cannot see the pad directly from there. Should be a fairly nice place to watch.

michaelSN99
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posted 04-26-2005 12:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for michaelSN99   Click Here to Email michaelSN99     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ben,

are you planning to make photographes of this historic event ???

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michael may www.ag-99.de/spacenet/main/main.html

Ben
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posted 04-26-2005 01:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yep, I'll be there!

------------------
-Ben

www.LaunchPhotography.com

Ryan Walters
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From: Hattiesburg, MS, USA
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posted 04-26-2005 01:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ryan Walters   Click Here to Email Ryan Walters     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I will be there for the event as well. But I didn't know there was anything on Friday evening? Did I miss something here? I would love to view the launch so where is the best place to get?

Ben
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From: Daytona Beach, FL
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posted 04-26-2005 01:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ryan and those who will not be at the Saturn V Center gala:

The best viewing is from Port Canaveral, right where the cruise ship terminals are, and alongside the road that leads to the CCAFS main Gate.

Directions to get there are simple if you know how to get to 528/The Beeline Expressway.

If you are staying in Cocoa Beach get on A1A north and it becomes 528 as it curves around towards the west. If you are in Titusville just take I-95 or Route 1 south to 528 East.

Coming from either way (528 from the West or A1A from Cocoa Beach) you want to take the BLUE sign exit marked: Terminal A: North Cargo Pier.

After you exit, go over the drawbridge and proceed about half a mile until where the road goes under an overpass and turns sharply to the right at the same time (you can't miss this turn).

Pull off on the left (water) side of the road in the grass. This is where everyone watches from and is the closest public spot to pad 40, despite being about ten miles away.

It's a great clear view across the water and if the wind is calm the sound will be loud.

Hope this helps guys.

Here is a not-so-geat map of the Port area:
http://shrimpin.com/154c8f60.jpg

The viewing area I am describing is right under the word "Year" in "20 Year Master Plan".

DavidH
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From: Huntsville, AL, USA
Registered: Jun 2003

posted 04-26-2005 01:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidH   Click Here to Email DavidH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
The weekend will launch on Friday evening with ASF's annual Induction Gala, followed by Saturday's Induction Ceremony. Guests will be transported from Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex to its award winning Apollo Saturn V Center for the gala, to include a reception and an exquisite dinner. The night will be full of excitement, as old and new inductees are introduced while making their red carpet entrance.

http://www.astronautscholarship.org/2005_ahof_induction.html

------------------
http://allthese worlds.hatbag.net/space.php
"America's challenge of today has forged man's destiny of tomorrow." - Commander Eugene Cernan, Apollo 17 Mission, 11 December 1972

Ryan Walters
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From: Hattiesburg, MS, USA
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posted 04-26-2005 04:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ryan Walters   Click Here to Email Ryan Walters     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I didn't know about the gala dinner? How could this be? I got my tickets to the other stuff though!

michaelSN99
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posted 04-26-2005 06:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for michaelSN99   Click Here to Email michaelSN99     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
...there is a little bit...envy... ;-)

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michael may www.ag-99.de/spacenet/main/main.html

Rob Joyner
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posted 04-26-2005 07:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ryan,
Try the link below; same as David provided. It states there are still tickets available.
http://www.astronautscholarship.org/2005_ahof_induction.html

Ben
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From: Daytona Beach, FL
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posted 04-26-2005 09:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceflightNow's mission status center is active:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/titan/b30/status.html

There is a 95% chance of acceptable weather conditions Friday; 90 Saturday and 80 Sunday.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-30-2005 12:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Lockheed Martin Press Release

The United States Air Force and Lockheed Martin (LMT:NYSE) wrote the final chapter in a five-decade history at Cape Canaveral tonight with the final launch of a Titan IV B heavy-lift rocket carrying a critical national security payload for the National Reconnaissance Office. The rocket thundered away from its pad adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean amid the cheers of many who had gathered to watch the historic mission.

"With our customers, we share a tremendous pride in this successful flight, tempered only by our sense of sadness as the proud history of Titan here at Cape Canaveral comes to a close for our team," said G. Thomas Marsh, executive vice president of Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company. "It is always impressive to hear the roar of a Titan IV as it streaks into space, but this rocket got help in getting off the ground by the hard work, prayers and wishes of thousands of employees and retirees whose dedication to mission success is unparalleled."

Tonight's launch was the second-to-last launch for the venerable heavy-lift workhorse Titan IV. The final vehicle will fly from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. this summer. In all, 27 Titan IVs have been launched from CCAFS and 11 from Vandenberg. Titan IV is the culmination of a long evolution from the original Titan I intercontinental ballistic missile.

Col. Michael T. Baker, director, Launch Programs, Space and Missile Systems Center, Air Force Space Command, said, "Titan has performed honorably by providing us strategic deterrence in the form of the Titan ICBMs, helping us explore our universe by launching NASA missions like Cassini, assisting our manned space activities by launching NASA's Gemini test flights and supporting our national decision makers and our warfighters in the field by deploying spacecraft such as the one launched tonight. The men and women of the Martin Marietta Corporation, now Lockheed Martin Space Systems, have much to be proud of. The Air Force is grateful to have been a part of this wonderfully successful program."

Titan IV developed into the nation's heavy-lift workhorse following the Space Shuttle Challenger tragedy in 1986 when assured access to space became critical for the U.S. government. Titan IV A was followed by Titan IV B with a new generation of large solid rocket motors, state-of-the-art guidance and electronics and a new ground processing system.

"At each Titan launch, I have always had the feeling I was standing too close," said Dennis Fitzgerald, acting director, National Reconnaissance Office. "We are coming to the end of an era. The men and women of Team Titan who dedicated their talents and toil to this next-to-last launch have our heartfelt gratitude for their sacrifices. They also have the personal satisfaction of knowing their actions were vitally important to our nation's security."

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-30-2005 12:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Photographs of the last Titan IV launch from Cape Canaveral, taken from outside the Saturn V Center during the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation's Astronaut Hall of Fame Induction Gala (April 29, 2005):

John K. Rochester
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From: Rochester, NY, USA
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posted 04-30-2005 09:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for John K. Rochester   Click Here to Email John K. Rochester     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Goosebumps!! I got goosebumps from those photos Robert..

Goodbye Titan..you served the Space Program admirably.

Ben
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From: Daytona Beach, FL
Registered: May 2000

posted 04-30-2005 11:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My photos shot for SpaceflightNow and soon to be included in a gallery/story:

------------------
-Ben

www.LaunchPhotography.com

[This message has been edited by collectSPACE Admin (edited May 01, 2005).]

Rob Joyner
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posted 05-01-2005 01:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great photos Robert!
Good to see you again. What a great night it was!

Ryan Walters
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From: Hattiesburg, MS, USA
Registered: Apr 2005

posted 05-02-2005 08:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ryan Walters   Click Here to Email Ryan Walters     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great Photos indeed! I was at the launch but not at the Saturn V center. Ben I want to thank you for the directions to Port Canaveral! That was a great location to see the launch. I followed your directions right to it. I had my doubts for a few minutes but I pushed on and I'm glad I did! Thanks buddy!

Ben
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Posts: 1843
From: Daytona Beach, FL
Registered: May 2000

posted 05-02-2005 09:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Glad you enjoyed it Ryan. I've watched from there a few times, it's a great view despite the distance.

A bunch of friends of mine went there Friday for the launch. They said it was fantastic but the sound was not too great as the wind was coming from the South.

When you are that far away the wind can make a big difference; I've seen launches from that spot that are very loud or barely audible.

But a night launch dazzles no matter what; you don't realize just how unbelievably bright it is until you see it in person..it lights up the state. My friend called from a highway out of Orlando and asked "was there just a launch?!."

Ryan, do you have photos or video you could share?

------------------
-Ben

www.LaunchPhotography.com

Ryan Walters
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From: Hattiesburg, MS, USA
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posted 05-03-2005 10:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ryan Walters   Click Here to Email Ryan Walters     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The launch was good from there but you are right the sound was not very loud because of the wind. I knew that too and hoped it would die down by launch time but it did not. But no I don't have any photos or video of the launch. I'm not very good at night photography! But I do have a photo of me shaking Lovell's hand! ha ha.

michaelSN99
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posted 05-05-2005 04:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for michaelSN99   Click Here to Email michaelSN99     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
hey Ben,

really great shots...i am interested in how you take this photos from such close positions to the pad..are you using automatic controlled cameras or are you working with remote sensors ?

------------------
michael may www.ag-99.de/spacenet/main/main.html

Ben
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From: Daytona Beach, FL
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posted 05-05-2005 06:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
They are sound activated; you build a circuit that was a microphone attached and can be hooked up to the camera. Anytime you see photos taken of launches, Shuttle or any, closeup like that, that is how they are taken.

Occasionally you will find vibration or light sensors too, namely as a supplement, but most use sound by itself or as the base trigger.

Thanks.

------------------
-Ben

www.LaunchPhotography.com

michaelSN99
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posted 05-07-2005 10:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for michaelSN99   Click Here to Email michaelSN99     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
ben,

we have to thank you for this interesting information and the great shots !!

how close to the pad the camera have been located during the titan launch IV ???

------------------
michael may www.ag-99.de/spacenet/main/main.html

Ben
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posted 05-07-2005 11:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't know exactly, it's hard to tell how far anything is at the Cape unless you know because there is nothing around to provide perspective (that's why people are always amazed to learn the VAB is 525 feet tall and 15 miles away, or the lightning towers on the pads are 400).

I would guess 500-700 feet for this launch.

michaelSN99
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posted 05-08-2005 11:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for michaelSN99   Click Here to Email michaelSN99     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
you are right ben...the VAB is a really good example how difficult it is to guess measurments right without comparing sizes around....even for me as an architect ;-)

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michael may www.ag-99.de/spacenet/main/main.html

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