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  Descending from a full-scale Apollo Lunar Module

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Author Topic:   Descending from a full-scale Apollo Lunar Module
Charlie16
Member

Posts: 320
From: Italy
Registered: Dec 2010

posted 04-22-2013 06:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Charlie16   Click Here to Email Charlie16     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How does it feel to fall from the ladder of the Lunar Module? I tried to do with the suit worn, is really difficult and scary!

I don't had a helmet and even the PLSS, the suit was not rigid, but the rungs are tight for lunar boots and Earth's gravity does not help me...

Lunar Module (Omega), Apollo A7L Suit (Pizzimenti) — more photos.

garymilgrom
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Posts: 1571
From: Atlanta, GA, USA
Registered: Feb 2007

posted 04-22-2013 07:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bravo Luigi! What is the story behind the full scale replicas of the LM and rover?

model maker
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Posts: 99
From: Colorado, USA
Registered: May 2012

posted 04-22-2013 08:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for model maker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I always wondered why the ladder rungs only went down so far. Neil Armstrong had to jump back up to the first rung and made it but what if it was still too high in lunar gravity?

Ronpur
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Posts: 211
From: Brandon, Fl
Registered: May 2012

posted 04-22-2013 09:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ronpur   Click Here to Email Ronpur     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think that is something we would all love to try!! Very awesome!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27327
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-22-2013 10:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by model maker:
I always wondered why the ladder rungs only went down so far.
The Apollo Lunar Surface Journal has the answer:
The interior of each of the primary [landing gear] struts contains a piston and a compressible honeycomb structure... full compression of the honeycomb structure in a hard landing would have shortened the primary strut by 32 inches (81 cm).

...the bottom of the ladder was attached to the primary strut just above the point where the lower part of the strut could slide into the upper part. Consequently, full compression of the primary strut would have left the bottom rung of the ladder just above the footpad. However, there was never any significant compression ("stroking") of any of the struts in any of the landings, so the astronauts had to contend with a jump of slightly more than 32 inches. Fortunately, one-sixth gravity made it relatively easy. All you needed to do was give a little push with the legs and, with your hands on the outside rail, guide yourself up.

Charlie16
Member

Posts: 320
From: Italy
Registered: Dec 2010

posted 04-23-2013 02:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Charlie16   Click Here to Email Charlie16     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Robert, You've anticipated me.

In fact, the commanders of the six Apollo missions went down very gently without crushing the pistons. Pete Conrad had to make a huge leap...

Crushable aluminum honeycomb cartridge designed for the Lunar Module's landing gear primary struts, 48 inches tall, 5½ inches in diameter, and less than 5lb in weight. Finely-engineered aluminum in honeycomb formation, alloy caps and collar. Three Grumman paper parts labels, a few inspection stamps on the alloy parts. A few minor dents.

How to land Eagle safely on the moon? This was the problem faced by NASA and Grumman engineers. Once the "contact light" lit, indicating the Lunar Module's probes had touched the lunar surface, Armstrong and Aldrin would shut off the engines and the LM would drop the remaining distance to the ground. Conventional hydraulic or pneumatic shock absorbers in the landing gear would be heavy and could leak, and Tom Kelly of Grumman insisted on a reliable and lightweight design. A company called Hexcel had developed aluminum honeycomb as a lightweight, rigid, high-strength filler material for aircraft control surfaces; they suggested their honeycomb might fit the bill. The landing gear would suffer only a one-time shock, so a reusable system was unnecessary. The honeycomb would be the buffer for an inner cylinder as it slid up inside an outer cylinder.

Compressing by as much as 32 inches, the honeycomb was designed for an impact of up to ten feet per second. In fact no Apollo mission landed at more than four feet per second. As a result, Eagle's struts did not collapse as much as expected, leaving the ladder some way above the moon's surface. Just after exiting the LM, Armstrong remarked "I just checked getting back up to that first step, Buzz. It's ... the strut isn't collapsed too far, but it's adequate to get back up."

Designed for the sole purpose of landing a man on the moon, this object is a fine example of the ingenuity that made the Apollo landings a success.

credit: Bonhams and Steve Jurvetson

Charlie16
Member

Posts: 320
From: Italy
Registered: Dec 2010

posted 04-23-2013 03:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Charlie16   Click Here to Email Charlie16     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by garymilgrom:
Bravo Luigi! What is the story behind the full scale replicas of the LM and rover?
Thank Gary! The Lunar Module and Lunar Rover have been built by Omega in the late 90's to promote their watches.

Norman.King
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Posts: 225
From: Herne Bay, Kent, UK
Registered: Feb 2010

posted 04-23-2013 08:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Norman.King   Click Here to Email Norman.King     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great stuff. Can I come and play too.

nasamad
Member

Posts: 1890
From: Essex, UK
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 04-23-2013 02:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for nasamad   Click Here to Email nasamad     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's probably the LRV that I have seen Stafford and Cernan driving in the past.

Your a lucky man Luigi, well done pal.

Charlie16
Member

Posts: 320
From: Italy
Registered: Dec 2010

posted 04-23-2013 07:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Charlie16   Click Here to Email Charlie16     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by nasamad:
That's probably the LRV that I have seen Stafford and Cernan driving in the past.
Exactly! It was driven by Stafford and Cernan and Pizzimenti...

Charlie16
Member

Posts: 320
From: Italy
Registered: Dec 2010

posted 04-23-2013 07:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Charlie16   Click Here to Email Charlie16     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
OMEGA LRV:

Charlie16
Member

Posts: 320
From: Italy
Registered: Dec 2010

posted 04-26-2013 09:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Charlie16   Click Here to Email Charlie16     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With Charlie Duke inside the replica of the Apollo Command Module "Casper".

Norman.King
Member

Posts: 225
From: Herne Bay, Kent, UK
Registered: Feb 2010

posted 04-26-2013 01:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Norman.King   Click Here to Email Norman.King     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That must have been a great day.

Charlie16
Member

Posts: 320
From: Italy
Registered: Dec 2010

posted 04-29-2013 01:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Charlie16   Click Here to Email Charlie16     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Norman.King:
That must have been a great day.

The biggest...

Tykeanaut
Member

Posts: 1623
From: Worcestershire, England, UK.
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 04-29-2013 04:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Was that in Switzerland then Luigi?

Charlie16
Member

Posts: 320
From: Italy
Registered: Dec 2010

posted 04-29-2013 09:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Charlie16   Click Here to Email Charlie16     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tykeanaut:
Was that in Switzerland then Luigi?
It's been exposed to Martigny in 2012. Now is exposed near Varese, Italy.

I'm ready to expose all over the world, please contact me if you want to organize an exhibition.

All times are CT (US)

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