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  Collecting spacesuits (and their layers)

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Author Topic:   Collecting spacesuits (and their layers)
Altidude
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Posts: 41
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Registered: Jan 2016

posted 04-28-2019 05:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Altidude   Click Here to Email Altidude     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have seen multiple spacesuit TMG layers for sale, however does anyone collect the outer layer Beta cloth covering of the spacesuits? This seems like it would be considered different from the TMG layer.

Does anyone have any experience in this?

Chuckster01
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Posts: 773
From: Orlando, FL
Registered: Jan 2014

posted 04-28-2019 06:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Chuckster01   Click Here to Email Chuckster01     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The TMG is the part of the spacesuit you see in photographs and on TV. I believe they are now Nomex and not Beta cloth but the Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment (TMG or ITMG) is the white outer layer of a spacesuit.

The TMG has three functions: To insulate the suit occupant and prevent heat loss, to shield the occupant from harmful solar radiation, and to protect the astronaut from micrometeoroids and other orbital debris, which could puncture the suit and depressurize it.

Altidude
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Registered: Jan 2016

posted 04-28-2019 06:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Altidude   Click Here to Email Altidude     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks! So did the command module pilot have a TMG?

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 41549
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-28-2019 06:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Quoting Wikipedia (for expediency):
Command module pilots only wore a three-layer Intravehicular Cover Layer (IVCL) of nomex and beta cloth for fire and abrasion protection.

Altidude
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posted 04-28-2019 06:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Altidude   Click Here to Email Altidude     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks! This is the info I was needing. However, would a CMP beta cloth covering be equivalent to a TMG in collecting terms and value?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 41549
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-28-2019 06:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Apollo-era spacesuit layers are not so plentiful that there is enough of a sale history or supply to predict a market performance difference between examples. It would likely more hinge on other factors, including the provenance of the particular spacesuit layer, its condition and the venue through which it was being offered.

Altidude
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Posts: 41
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Registered: Jan 2016

posted 04-28-2019 06:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Altidude   Click Here to Email Altidude     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Robert! That’s very interesting. It makes one wonder how many Apollo TMG or beta cloth coverings are out there. If we knew the number, we would understand the rarity.

Joel Katzowitz
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Posts: 792
From: Marietta GA USA
Registered: Dec 1999

posted 04-29-2019 07:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Joel Katzowitz   Click Here to Email Joel Katzowitz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I recently got my hands on an Apollo Space Suit Material Sample Layup which consists of material samples used in the suits for the Apollo J missions (15,16, and 17). Here's part of the write up:
Basically two material configurations of the Apollo space suit assembly were utilized to support the Apollo J-missions (Apollo 15, 16, and 17) that involved three day lunar surface stays with three lunar surface extravehicular activities (EVAs) that were supported by a Lunar Roving Vehicle. These suit assemblies included an intravehicular (IV) configuration designated as the Command Module Pilot (CMP) A7L pressure garment assembly (PGA), and the extravehicular (EV) configuration identified as the EV A7LB PGA. The CMP A7L pressure garment configuration was worn by the Command Module Pilot. The EV A7LB suit configuration was worn by both the Lunar Module Crew Commander and the Lunar Module Pilot.

This artifact sample is the material layup for the A7L-CMP space suit assembly configuration. Two separate protective material envelopes were employed in the construction of both Apollo suit configurations: an outer thermal and micrometeoroid protective envelope identified as the Integrated Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment (ITMG) and an inner pressurizeable envelope identified as the Torso and Limb suit assembly (TLSA).

During the course of the Apollo Program, these Space Suit Material Sample Layup displays were developed and prepared for use in technical presentations to inform and educate Apollo astronauts, NASA engineers and management. The presentations addressed specific aspects of the design features of the various space suit configurations.

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