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  Apollo Saturn V moon rocket quick release pin

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Author Topic:   Apollo Saturn V moon rocket quick release pin
Tykeanaut
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Posts: 1894
From: Worcestershire, England, UK.
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 12-31-2012 07:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would like to know if anyone knows what this quick release pin's exact use was? I am pretty sure it was a ground support equipment (GSE) item.

mikej
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Posts: 414
From: Germantown, WI USA
Registered: Jan 2004

posted 12-31-2012 06:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mikej   Click Here to Email mikej     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It was used to reduce the shock when the Saturn V's holddown arms released the vehicle at launch.

Usually they're referred to as "soft", "slow" or "controlled" release pins or rods (rather than "quick").

There's more discussion in this regard in this thread.

SpaceAholic
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Posts: 3276
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-31-2012 07:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mike, this is a manually engaged/manually retracted quick release pin... would be surprised if its intended application is as described in the referenced thread.

GACspaceguy
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Posts: 1655
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 01-01-2013 05:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not sure about the Saturn V application but this is a common "pip" pin used in aviation. Typically there is a "Remove Before Flight " streamer attached to it and is used in lock out areas like the landing gear and/or covers and support equipment.

David Carey
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Posts: 408
From:
Registered: Mar 2009

posted 01-01-2013 12:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for David Carey   Click Here to Email David Carey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Fred's PIP explanation makes the most sense to me so far and to your original comment I associate quick-release fasteners of most any kind to ground versus flight.

I can make out some of the writing on the card -

"An original Quick Release Pin designed for the mighty Saturn V Moon Rocket by the Boeing Company at the Michoud facility in New Orleans Louisiana where the Saturn V F1 engines were (????) under contract with NASA"

But the contract numbers and other caption may help the group (or a better picture).

Tykeanaut
Member

Posts: 1894
From: Worcestershire, England, UK.
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 01-01-2013 01:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks all for your input.

It's spare parts #NAS1335S2S24D, Contract # NAS8-5608.

It was apparently used in the testing of the Saturn V F-1 first stage engines under contact with NASA.

GACspaceguy
Member

Posts: 1655
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 01-01-2013 01:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Okay, the basic part number is NAS1335 and the "NAS" is National Aerospace Standard, therefore it is a common quick release pin but for my 30+ years around the aircraft flight line we have always called them pip pins (due to the pip or retractable ball pin at the end of the shank.

While it may have been used on the Saturn V it was not specifically designed for that vehicle as it is a standard aerospace part.

All times are CT (US)

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