Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Hardware & Flown Items
  Personal Preference Kit (PPK) manifests

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Personal Preference Kit (PPK) manifests
gajs
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 09-22-2007 10:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gajs   Click Here to Email gajs     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm just curious, has anyone tried the "Freedom of Information Act" as it applies to the astronauts PPK's? Anybody know? Best, GAJS

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-22-2007 10:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gajs:
I'm just curious, has anyone tried the "Freedom of Information Act" as it applies to the astronauts PPK's?
It has been tried. The filing returns a letter by Deke Slayton that reads in part:
The only list of PPK contents is retained by me. I certify to the Mission Director on each mission that the contents meet flammability and toxicity requirements and are non-controversial in nature. We do not intend to make this list available to anyone else at any time. It is the crew's prerogative to discuss the contents after the flight if they wish. Since these items are personal in nature, we do not feel that NASA has any other official prerogative on the issue.
I have spent time searching the NASA archives held at the University of Houston, Clear Lake for record of the PPKs, as has the archivist herself. They simply aren't among the records turned over by NASA, and for its part, NASA says it did not retain copies of the manifests after the archives were transferred.

gajs
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 09-22-2007 10:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gajs   Click Here to Email gajs     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
It has been tried. The filing returns a letter by Deke Slayton that reads in part
Now that Deke Slayton is deceased, maybe another try should be made by those parties interested in these items.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-22-2007 10:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gajs:
Now that DS is deceased, maybe another try should be made by those parities interested in these items.
The Slayton letter was provided after his passing, as recently as last year, per a reader's report by e-mail. But have at it, maybe your mileage will vary...

mjanovec
Member

Posts: 3647
From: Midwest, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 09-22-2007 10:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gajs:
I'm just curious, has anyone tried the "Freedom of Information Act" as it applies to the astronauts PPK's?
While I would very much like to see what was flown in the PPKs from a collecting standpoint, I would be against revealing those contents against the astronauts wishes. After all, one "P" stands for personal. I firmly believe the astronauts have the right to keep those items personal, if they so choose.

And even though these astronauts were employees of the government at the time, that does not automatically mean every single aspect of their lives during that time should be available to the public.

Hypothetical situation here... Let's say an astronaut decided to take a small container with the ashes of a deceased loved one (or a lock of hair or whatever) on a mission. Consider what an extremely personal and private thing that is. Now consider how the astronauts would feel if that privacy was violated by some collector wanting to make their PPK public for everyone to see.

I think what Deke saw fit to be private should remain private.

spkane
Member

Posts: 95
From: Annandale, NJ, USA
Registered: Sep 2007

posted 12-08-2009 11:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spkane   Click Here to Email spkane     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Can someone direct me to a resource where I can find the PPK manifest information for the Apollo 10, 15 and 16 missions?

Many thanks in advance for the advice.

Editor's note: Threads merged

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-08-2009 11:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Steve, I moved your post to this thread as it notes why the PPK manifests are not available unless an astronaut (and/or his family) should decide to disclose the list, which to my knowledge has yet to be done in any publicly accessible manner.

freshspot
Member

Posts: 301
From: Lexington, MA, USA
Registered: Dec 2005

posted 12-09-2009 03:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for freshspot   Click Here to Email freshspot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I own Gene Cernan's Apollo 17 lunar surface APK.

He was happy to share with me the contents of the bag as he recalls them. I've posted it here.

Dave Scott (not the astronaut)
www.apolloartifacts.com

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-09-2009 05:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Dave, and that raises a good point: the Slayton-set policy applies to flights prior to Apollo 17: as a result of what transpired on Apollo 15, NASA formalized its rules as it applied to mementos being carried onboard U.S. spacecraft leading to the formal creation of the Official Flight Kit (OFK) and the criteria for disclosure of APK/PPK contents.

Initially (c. early 1972) the rule was as follows:

Each crew member may divulge the contents of his APK publicly, prior to launch, at his own discretion.
That policy was revised in August 1972:
The contents of the APKs for a given mission may be announced by the astronaut or his designee at a time of his choosing subsequent to the approval of the contents by the AA/MSF. However, items that have not been announced publicly cannot be divulged in personal stories by a flight astronaut. In any event, the list of items shall be made public by NASA within 30 days after completion of the flight.
That version stood in effect through Apollo 17, Skylab and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. For the space shuttle era, the rules were again revisited as the entire policy was codified into Federal Regulations (Title 14, Volume 5, Part 1214.6):
Information on the contents of PPKs will be routinely released to the media and to the public upon their request immediately following postflight inventory.
Modern experience suggests that the required postflight inventory can take months to complete following any given mission.

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2014 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement