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Author Topic:   Never Panic Early (Fred Haise, Bill Moore)
Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 48352
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-03-2021 02:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Never Panic Early: An Apollo 13 Astronaut's Journey
by Fred Haise with Bill Moore
The Apollo 13 mission in 1970 had the world on edge. An oxygen tank exploded three days in, turning the moon landing mission into a heart-stopping rescue mission. In his riveting memoir Never Panic Early, Apollo 13's Lunar Module Pilot Fred Haise gives readers a front row seat to the harrowing event and the remarkable experience of being an astronaut.

Haise started his NASA career as a research pilot before serving as backup lunar module pilot for the Apollo 8 and 11 missions, the lunar module pilot for the notorious Apollo 13 mission, the backup spacecraft commander for the Apollo 16 mission, and was meant to command the Apollo 19 mission until cancellation. Never Panic Early shares intense and incredible highlights from one of only 24 astronauts to have flown to the moon.

From commanding the revolutionary space shuttle Enterprise during his Approach and Landing Tests to surviving a nearly fatal accident during an air show, Haise takes readers through the ups, downs, and unexpected turns of his career. The book explorers his most thrilling moments and demonstrates his endurance, strength, and calm in the face of many challenges.

Never Panic Early is a compelling journey through sky and space. It follows Haise through the Mississippi coast where he grew up, his time as a fighter pilot for the U.S. Marine Corps and a tactical fighter pilot for the U.S. Air Force, his years climbing up the ranks at NASA, and the exceptional experience of looking down at Earth from a rocket. Haise is sincere, reflective, and hopeful in his first-time account of his life. Offering an insider's look at flying for NASA and the "successful failure" that was Apollo 13, the book is an essential read for space buffs.

  • Hardcover, 304 pages
  • Smithsonian Books (April 5, 2022)
  • ISBN-10: ‎1588347133
  • ISBN-13: ‎978-1588347138

Rick Mulheirn
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Posts: 4457
From: England
Registered: Feb 2001

posted 07-03-2021 03:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Mulheirn   Click Here to Email Rick Mulheirn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great news. I asked Freddo when he was last at Space Lectures about a book and nothing was on the cards. I’m just delighted to hear that “Pecky” has had a change of heart.

Kite
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Posts: 1028
From: Northampton UK
Registered: Nov 2009

posted 07-03-2021 04:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kite     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'll second that Rick. One of the Apollo astronauts I have always hoped would eventually write his life story. Really pleased.

Henry Heatherbank
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Posts: 294
From: Adelaide, South Australia
Registered: Apr 2005

posted 07-04-2021 07:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Henry Heatherbank     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Cannot wait for this one!

gareth89
Member

Posts: 471
From: Ireland
Registered: May 2014

posted 07-04-2021 11:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gareth89   Click Here to Email gareth89     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It’s brilliant to hear Freddo has a book on the way!

I have to say I've always thought that he was one of the friendliest, most gracious astronauts I've ever met, who shared several great stories with me of his Irish visits!

I'm looking forward to reading more of his stories in his own words!

Blackarrow
Member

Posts: 3457
From: Belfast, United Kingdom
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 07-04-2021 07:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A lot of people will be looking forward to reading this! The history of the Apollo years, and what led up to them, needs to be preserved and remembered. I'm delighted Fred decided to do this.

David C
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Posts: 1338
From: Lausanne
Registered: Apr 2012

posted 07-05-2021 01:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Fantastic news.

Grounded!
Member

Posts: 496
From: Bennington, Vermont, USA
Registered: Feb 2011

posted 07-14-2021 01:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Grounded!   Click Here to Email Grounded!     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wonderful!

Gilbert
Member

Posts: 1441
From: Carrollton, GA USA
Registered: Jan 2003

posted 03-23-2022 02:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gilbert   Click Here to Email Gilbert     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Looking forward to this book.

Dietrich
Member

Posts: 83
From:
Registered: Jul 2009

posted 04-04-2022 03:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dietrich   Click Here to Email Dietrich     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Why is the cover photo side-inversed? The flag does not seem to be depicted correctly if I am right.

The photo is obviously KSC-70PC-76, see e.g. the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 48352
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-04-2022 04:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I saw mention that this was done purposely, for aesthetic reasons. It was better to flip the photo than have Haise looking toward the spine of the book.

Rick Mulheirn
Member

Posts: 4457
From: England
Registered: Feb 2001

posted 04-14-2022 01:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Mulheirn   Click Here to Email Rick Mulheirn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just finished reading my copy of Fred's new book. We all know the story for the most part so "spoilers" aren't an issue. But I can confirm it is a great read.

I was particularly looking forward to Fred’s perspective on Apollo 13 but found the story surrounding the shuttle drop test program just as interesting: full of the kind of detail you would expect from a test pilot!

I've had the pleasure of Fred's company a number of times over the years and what struck me most about each encounter is Fred's humility. The new book captures this perfectly.

Thanks you Fred and Bill both.

Mariner1824
New Member

Posts: 8
From: Essex, United Kingdom
Registered: Jan 2019

posted 04-18-2022 10:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mariner1824     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Finished reading Fred's book last night and I think it is a cracking read! It's not the longest of the Apollo astronauts books but that makes it more focused and there's absolutely no filler.

There's something of interest on every page and Fred's concise style points to every word being carefully chosen; and whilst there may not be many new revelations, it is really interesting to get a feel for Fred's thoughts during his life and career. I was particularly moved by the passage dealing with his crash injuries and recovery.

A very enjoyable read, and a genuinely valuable addition to the canon of astronaut memoirs.

OWL
Member

Posts: 187
From: United Kingdom
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 04-18-2022 12:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for OWL   Click Here to Email OWL     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Never Panic Early: The title of this much awaited and anticipated book clearly illustrates the credo of a test pilot.

The title repeats itself throughout this excellent account of Fred's life.

This well written piece of work is not just another account of the well known Apollo 13 mission but gives a very broad look at Fred's life and career before and after his well documented years as an astronaut.

Having spent a considerable amount of time in Fred's company I feel the book perfectly captures the very human side of his personality and how he truly sees himself as an ordinary guy that worked hard and maximised the opportunities that life presented.

His great sense of humour is shown several times in the book, but without giving too much away, check out the story of the Apollo 13 crew visit to Fat Boys restaurant at Coco Beach the night before before the command and service module chamber test.

At the other end of the spectrum, read about the harrowing account of Fred's road to recovery after the plane crash and subsequent burns he endured. It felt like the literary equivalent of Niki Lauda's trauma illustrated in the Hollywood movie Rush.

It becomes obvious to the reader, that the collaboration and trust is evident between Fred and Bill Moore and has resulted in a excellent addition to every "space buff's" library.

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