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  Apollo Pilot: Memoir of Astronaut Donn Eisele (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   Apollo Pilot: Memoir of Astronaut Donn Eisele
cspg
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posted 04-11-2016 09:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Apollo Pilot: The Memoir of Astronaut Donn Eisele
Edited and with a foreword by Francis French
Afterword by Susie Eisele Black
Historical overview by Amy Shira Teitel
In October 1968 Donn Eisele flew with fellow astronauts Walt Cunningham and Wally Schirra into Earth orbit in Apollo 7. The first manned mission in the Apollo program and the first manned flight after a fire during a launch pad test killed three astronauts in early 1967, Apollo 7 helped restart NASA's manned-spaceflight program.

Known to many as a goofy, lighthearted prankster, Eisele worked his way from the U.S. Naval Academy to test pilot school and then into the select ranks of America's prestigious astronaut corps. He was originally on the crew of Apollo 1 before being replaced due to injury. After that crew died in a horrific fire, Eisele was on the crew selected to return Americans to space. Despite the success of Apollo 7, Eisele never flew in space again, as divorce and a testy crew commander led to the three astronauts being labeled as troublemakers.

Unbeknownst to everyone, after his retirement as a technical assistant for manned spaceflight at NASA's Langley Research Center in 1972, Eisele wrote in detail about his years in the air force and his time in the Apollo program. Long after his death, Francis French discovered Eisele's unpublished memoir, and Susie Eisele Black (Donn's widow) allowed French access to her late husband's NASA files and personal effects. Readers can now experience an Apollo story they assumed would never be written as well as the story behind its discovery.

capoetc
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posted 04-11-2016 02:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Excellent news. I had no idea this book was in the works, and it promises to be well done given who the editor will be. Looking forward to reading it!

Kite
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posted 04-11-2016 02:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kite     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Me too. Can't wait for it to be published.

ColinBurgess
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posted 04-11-2016 04:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This has been a long-held secret, albeit known to a select number of people, and it will be a very proud addition to the Outward Odyssey series.

Through Francis, I was able to read the first, raw manuscript that he and Susie located when going through Eisele's personal effects for information to be used in our joint "In the Shadow of the Moon" book, and Donn certainly pulls no punches in his narrative. It's not a huge book, as it was mostly comprised of unedited stories that Eisele was putting together, possibly with a view to having it published one day, but perhaps he was holding back on this as some of his views on certain people and events are particularly forthright.

It may not be huge in size (which is why some extraneous material by Amy Shira Teitel was added), but it certainly is an impact book and potently fills a void in the overall Apollo astronaut story.

Silent Sea
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posted 04-11-2016 06:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Silent Sea     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Definitely a must have for me.

Jurg Bolli
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posted 04-11-2016 09:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jurg Bolli   Click Here to Email Jurg Bolli     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Same here, a definite must have!

David C
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posted 04-12-2016 02:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sounds very interesting.

garymilgrom
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posted 04-12-2016 02:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Pre-ordered!

robsouth
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posted 05-24-2016 03:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for robsouth     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Can't wait for this. Definitely going to be getting a copy. Fantastic news!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-01-2016 02:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Kirkus has published an early review of "Apollo Pilot":
A posthumous memoir gives an unsung astronaut his due.

In the annals of manned space flight, Donn Eisele (1930-1987) would seem to be the forgotten man, his name not as recognizable as that of crewmates Wally Schirra and Walt Cunningham, let alone John Glenn and Neil Armstrong. Yet the author was a member of Apollo 7, the first manned mission in the Apollo program following the tragic launch that had killed their predecessors.

Well after his death, his widow shared some artifacts that included various drafts of a memoir, mainly focusing on his formative experiences in becoming an astronaut and his vivid impressions of the historic mission. Yet the book also suggests his bitterness at being marginalized in the aftermath of the mission and the tensions between the astronauts and those on the ground, particularly those more concerned with the public image of the space program than with safety...

ColinBurgess
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posted 11-15-2016 12:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Along with a selected number of book reviewers, I have just received my copy of "Apollo Pilot," and it's a terrific book. As mentioned earlier, it's not a big book, as Francis had to edit the book from a whole bunch of disorganised pages of text that Donn Eisele had assembled in the last few years of his life, and obviously there was going to be much more to come before he died so suddenly in Japan. But what is there makes for absorbing reading, some details of which — had he lived — he might have eventually chosen to leave out, as he is extremely critical of several people he worked with at NASA and elsewhere.

But Francis has done a masterful job of reassembling this manuscript (a terrific story in itself, which he relates in his foreword), and the story of the flight of Apollo 7, as related by Eisele himself, is quite fascinating and informative, with a bunch of new stories thrown in.

It may not be a big book, but it is a big story superbly told and edited, and it is only fitting that the oft-maligned Donn Eisele can at last speak for himself after all these years.

PeterO
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posted 11-15-2016 07:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for PeterO   Click Here to Email PeterO     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My copy is being delivered today from Amazon, and it will be at the top of the pile for my next read. Apollo 7 has always been one of my favorite missions.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-22-2016 04:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Francis French has shared the background story for "Apollo Pilot" on the University of Nebraska Press blog:
It almost sounds too good to be true: an unpublished memoir written by an astronaut who piloted the very first Apollo flight, sitting in a pile of papers in his widow’s closet. And yet that’s exactly what I came across when I was looking through the many boxes of space memorabilia and lifetime memories at the home of Susie Eisele Black, the widow of Apollo 7 astronaut Donn Eisele...

divemaster
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posted 11-23-2016 09:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My review on Amazon

I have the unique perspective of being friends with the author, Francis French, knowing, working with and being good friends of Apollo 7's Walt Cunningham and Wally Schirra (I wrote the Foreword to the book "Sigma 7: The Six Mercury Orbits of Walter M. Schirra, Jr." by Colin Burgess) and consider myself well versed in the flight of Apollo 7. I thought I had heard all of the possible stories over the years having known these three people on a personal level — but the voice of Donn Eisle was always a mystery.

Francis was lucky enough to stumble on the unpublished, raw, unedited comments of Donn Eisle through his [now] late wife Susan Eisle Black. These were untouched for almost 50 years. Francis has skillfully taken Donn Eisle's words and without adding any comments based on his own extensive knowledge of this flight, was able to bring Donn's voice back to life in 2016 from words that were written in the early 1970's. After reading "Apollo Pilot" I now have a complete picture of what that 11 day span in October 1968 was actually like. It has been said that Deke Slayton put a lot of thought into the makeup of each crew for Gemini, Apollo, Skylab and early Shuttle. After reading Donn's viewpoint, I have no idea how he put this particular crew together. However, the wonderment of Donn's one and only spaceflight shines through in his own words and it is well worth the time to read the book. While reading, I had to ignore Wally and Walt's well known comments out of my head so I could concentrate on Eisele's point of view. The first flight of Apollo has been forgotten through time and we all must remember that if Apollo 7 and its crew did not do well, Apollo 11 would have never landed on the moon "before the end of the decade", if at all.

My hat is off to Francis for not tinkering with this historic account of Donn Eisle. I'm sure it was tempting. If you're interested in the early Apollo program - or spaceflight at all - this is a must read and should be in your library. Well done, Francis! Thank you for allowing us to "hear" what Eisle was thinking.

Lastly, Susan Eisle Black's comments about how Donn and his personal life were depicted in the HBO series "From The Earth To The Moon" should not go unnoticed. Apollo 7 was barely mentioned in the book - and, it appears, that HBO took liberties with the story. I'm glad that Susan has pointed this out. Again, Bravo!

ea757grrl
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posted 11-23-2016 10:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ea757grrl   Click Here to Email ea757grrl     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm about two-thirds through reading "Apollo Pilot" and my thoughts generally echo what's been posted so far. There are sections of Eisele's career that go by in a single paragraph, and that leave you wondering what would have come had Eisele been able to complete the book himself. In other areas, he joins his Apollo 7 crewmate Walt Cunningham in pulling no punches about what was going on behind the scenes.

The flight of Apollo 7 is the central theme of the book. Eisele speaking for himself challenges some long-held assumptions about his role on Apollo 7, and it's refreshing to read the long-missing third perspective at last. His take on Wally Schirra as mission commander is especially interesting, and I'll let those who haven't read it discover that on their own. But what surprised me most was how eloquent Eisele is about the wonder of flying in space, and some passages of "Apollo Pilot" are downright beautiful to read.

This is a slender book that leaves you wishing fate hadn't prevented us from reading Eisele's complete account of his flight and his life. However, we can be thankful to Francis French for turning the unpublished memoir into an important addition to any space historian's library, and to the Eisele family for making it possible (and to Amy Shira Teitel for her contribution, too). Highly recommended!

emilyc1978
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posted 11-24-2016 11:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for emilyc1978   Click Here to Email emilyc1978     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's my review:

I was honored to be asked to blurb the back cover for this book; the blurb reads:

"At long last, the enigmatic Donn Eisele tells his story. Eisele holds nothing back in his memoirs discussing 1960s-era NASA and his historic Apollo 7 mission. His blunt reminiscences make other Apollo astronaut autobiographies look like kids’ books. His memoirs illuminate his frustrations with astronaut life, his unique, often quirky sense of humor, and his thrill at the view from Earth's orbit. Like it or not, Eisele tells it like it is — his long-silenced voice is finally brought to vivid life."

Expanding upon that, editor Francis French's opportunity to compile Eisele's memoirs - pulled from typed, sometimes hard-to-read aged onionskin paper - benefits spaceflight history in that it adds a long-missing puzzle piece. Many in the spaceflight community and beyond were (and continue to be) curious about Eisele's views regarding his mission, and his still-controversial personal decisions made around that time. His memoirs, sometimes very raw and edgy, fill in the gaps, and finally we know what it is like to hear his voice. An unmissable read.

------------------
This Space Available

ColinBurgess
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posted 11-24-2016 06:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In just the few days following its release, "Apollo Pilot" has been awarded a five-star rating in every review I have read of the book. Francis French has done a tough but exemplary job in editing what was literally a flimsy, dog-eared bunch of yellowing onion-skin papers with fractured episodes of Donn Eisle's self-written story into a truly amazing (albeit too brief) tale that thoroughly deserves the collective kudos of the reviewers. It leaves the reader wishing that Eisele had poured a little more effort into completing his narrative, as there are obvious gaps in the story which could not be filled. What this book does, however, is give us a personal look into the life and many accomplishments of this highly skilled Apollo pilot, whose personal life during the era of the monumental Space Race caused him to be shunned by many of his hypocritical peers and their outraged wives. It was a burdensome penalty for what would be regarded today as less than newsworthy, yet one he would be saddled with throughout the remainder of his sadly shortened life.

Donn Eisele did all that was expected of him during the flight of Apollo 7, and much, much more. His work was ultimately instrumental in America achieving the lunar-landing goal set by President Kennedy, yet today he is sadly remembered as an enigmatic and largely unknown part of what was later termed a rebellious - even mutinous - crew. It is an unfair reflection on his many achievements during his only space mission.

Despite his heavy workload, Donn Eisele also took time out to gaze at the blue planet they were orbiting, and offers vivid, almost poetic descriptions of what he saw and how he felt at those times.

Kudos should also be paid to Amy Shira Teitel for giving the reader a reflective suffix on the history of the Apollo program, and especially the historic mission carried out by the crew of Apollo 7.

It may be a slim volume, but as actor Spencer Tracy once famously said of his co-star Katharine Hepburn in a film: "Not much meat on her, but what there is, is cherce [choice]"!

DavidH
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posted 11-27-2016 03:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidH   Click Here to Email DavidH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I had the privilege of reading this book before release — reading portions of it multiple times before release, in fact — and was excited from the first time Francis mentioned to me what he'd laid hands on. For almost fifty years, we've heard other people talk about this story. The Apollo 7 mission — the first spaceflight of the capsule that would soon carry men to the moon — is a story often told, and with very different sides, depending on the teller. And Eisele's story in particular fascinates, adding to the tapestry of the complicated Apollo 7 mission the personal additional factor of (gasp!) astronaut divorce.

But since his passing almost three decades ago, while countless others have told their stories about Eisele, we've not been able to hear his — until now. Apollo Pilot is a lost treasure of the Apollo age, a missing piece from one of the more fascinating tales of the early space age.

------------------
Homesteading Space | Bold They Rise | davidhitt.net

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-02-2016 02:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
'Apollo Pilot': Late astronaut Donn Eisele's lost words rediscovered in new memoir

Donn Eisele became the thirtieth person, worldwide, to orbit the Earth as a member of NASA's first crew to launch aboard an Apollo spacecraft in 1968.

An officer in the Air Force, test pilot and later Peace Corps director and businessman, Eisele, 57, died 29 years ago on Friday (Dec. 2) without putting his experiences as an Apollo 7 astronaut to print, or so almost everyone thought.

"It's almost cliché to talk about 'lost' documents — and this one was not truly lost. However, it had been forgotten to everyone except Susie Eisele Black, Donn's widow, who may have been the only other person ever to read it until now," said Francis French, the editor of "Apollo Pilot: The Memoir of Astronaut Donn Eisele" (University of Nebraska Press, 2017).

Spoon
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posted 12-11-2016 09:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spoon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have just finished reading 'Apollo Pilot', and found it to be a moving experience.
The forgotten words of Donn Eisele, perhaps the least well known, or understood, member of the Apollo programs most underrated mission, speaks to us through the efforts of Francis French and helps to give us an understanding of the man himself.

Perhaps because, sadly, he was unable to go back to his writings and revise what he had put down on paper, his thoughts and reminisces have a refreshing honesty about them, untouched by any second thoughts or need for self censor. In turn, it makes for one of the best, most insightful astronaut memoirs I have read.

We must all be so grateful to Francis French for finally giving Donn his voice.
As his late wife Susie writes in the afterword:

They'll never be able to take the legacy of being an Apollo astronaut away from Donn. Never, ever, ever.

MCroft04
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posted 12-11-2016 02:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I too just completed this wonderful book, and concur with all the great compliments I've read (above).

From what I've read Francis had quite a task to take those notes from a box and turn them into a book. Thanks Francis.

My only problem is that I no longer have enough room on a single book shelf to hold all of the Outward Odyssey books. Darn good problem to have!

astro-nut
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posted 12-12-2016 11:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for astro-nut   Click Here to Email astro-nut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just received my copy of the book in the mail and I cannot wait to read this great story about one of our astronauts.

eurospace
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posted 12-16-2016 12:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for eurospace   Click Here to Email eurospace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Am still waiting. Amazon.co.uk speaks of delivery in January only.

FFrench
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posted 12-21-2016 06:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A nice review of the Apollo 7 astronaut memoir, by the guy who wrote an Apollo 14 astronaut biography...

FFrench
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posted 12-22-2016 03:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you, everyone, for the kind words about this labor of love. FYI, all proceeds are going to support a library program at a Florida library meaningful to the Eisele family - no one is making money from this book. Thanks for your support!

alanh_7
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posted 12-25-2016 12:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I got my copy for Christmas. Not easy task since Amazon.ca was showing delivery after January 1. But she figured out a way. Looking forward to this one.

Henry Heatherbank
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posted 12-27-2016 05:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Henry Heatherbank     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Everbody, here is my review on Amazon. I gave it 5 stars. Great job, Francis!!
A great book which gives a voice, after 30 years,to one of the lesser known Apollo astronauts.

First, Amazon, I don't know where you get your 192 pages from. It is a lot shorter than that at closer to 140 pages and that includes Susie Eisele Black's (excellent) afterword and Amy Shira Teitel's historical overview. The Eisele manuscript is only 118 pages long.

Francis has done a great job bringing this book to print in as unchanged fashion as he has. Without giving anything away, Eisele is very candid in his feelings toward Apollo management and also other astronauts, but his main venom is reserved for senior Apollo management, exacerbated by the "preventable" Apollo 1 fire. He mentions late in the book that most astronauts had a dislike for management. He doesn't go into astro-politics as much as one would have thought, but his views on some named astronauts are very clear,

Some overview points: First, his views are very raw, and seem to have been penned while emotions were still high. It is indicated later in the book by others that the book was written over different periods probably in the 1972-6 timeframe, so not long after Eisele left NASA and the USAF. I get the impression that if Eisele had completed this book while alive, much of the venom would have been edited out, either by Eisele due to the passage of time, or by his editor. So, it may have become a much more dull book.

Second, there are now three first hand accounts of Apollo 7 (Schirra's "Schirra's Space", Cunningham's "The All American Boys" and of course Apollo Pilot), so we get an interesting comparison of each astronaut's view of the others during the mission. That is interesting because Cunningham basically wrote that Eisele was a "follower" who got (badly) influenced by his dominant Commander and copied his abrasive behavior in training and in space, without necessarily having good reason to do so. (Eisele counters this at one point by saying he would rather have been abrasive, got the job done and lived to tell the tale than "be remembered for what a nice guy he was"). Both Eisele and Cunningham were critical of Schirra, but Eisele adopted a largely neutral (if not favourable) view of Cunningham. Eisele is particularly critical of Schirra's laid-back approach and his dis-interest in and unfamiliarity with the technical aspects of Apollo 7.

Third, Susie Eisele Black's Afterword is excellent, and gives a good insight into how Eisele's divorce was treated (from her perspective). Frankly, I wish this part of the book had been a lot longer, as it was truly fascinating.

As short as the book is, it does contain a lot of detail, and it is worth reading. The book does a very good job of giving a voice to one of the lesser known of the Group 3 astronauts.

FFrench
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posted 12-29-2016 12:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Henry, thank you so much for that very insightful review. Copies are now appearing in Barnes & Noble stores, I have been told - I really look forward to hearing other honest opinions on the book!

bwhite1976
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posted 01-02-2017 02:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bwhite1976   Click Here to Email bwhite1976     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Downloaded this yesterday and finished reading it this morning. A wonderful book. I never would have thought that here in 2017 we would be reading in Eisele's own words the events of his life and especially the Apollo 7 mission from his perspective.

I keep thinking about a particular passage as he describes seeing pad leader Guenter Wendt on launch day..."Guenter was the last person I saw before liftoff and that was the last time I ever saw him. Ironic, in a way."

Passages like that stay with you. Eisele really captured the human element of his experiences. A very good book.

FFrench
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posted 01-03-2017 05:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Oh, there is nothing nicer than to read that and feel that the book is doing exactly what I hoped it would - thank you! Yes, that line stuck with me too.

And a wonderful review today as well from The Space Review. They don't go easy on books they find negatives about, so this felt particularly gratifying, to receive such a positive review.

schnappsicle
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posted 01-06-2017 07:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for schnappsicle   Click Here to Email schnappsicle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just found out about this book a few minutes ago while reading other cS posts. I immediately went online and ordered it. After reading that the proceeds will help support a library program, I'm glad I bought the book directly from the publisher, instead of a used copy.

I will be taking the book with me to San Diego in May with the hope of getting Mr. French to sign it for me.

FFrench
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posted 01-06-2017 04:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'd be delighted to sign a copy for you. Thanks for the support!

ColinBurgess
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posted 01-20-2017 02:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's a fascinating interview with Francis French giving a little more detail on how he discovered that lost manuscript written so many years ago by Donn Eisele.
I had read somewhere years earlier that Donn had written a children’s book, but when I asked Susie about it, she told me that Donn had never finished it. However, I did not know that the draft was sitting in that closet.

In addition, there were drafts of speeches and other presentations Donn had made, and — most interestingly — a raw, no-holds-barred memoir draft for adults that delved into the anger he had felt at his managers, as well as tales of the illicit things astronauts got up to when the media was not looking. It was a very revelatory look behind the public astronaut image.

Kite
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posted 01-27-2017 05:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kite     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How fortunate and thankful we are to Colin and Francis for unearthing this gem of a memoir.

It is very well written and to read Donn Eisele's own account of his life as an astronaut at that historical time is a tremendous bonus. What a shame he never got around to writing of his time as back up to Apollo 10 as that would have been very interesting. His version of his leaving, and what he thought of Gordon Cooper not getting the role of commander of Apollo 13 and his thoughts on Alan Shepard putting himself on a prime crew instead of Cooper would have been enlightening.

That was not to be so we have to be grateful for what we have, which is a treasure and fits so well with the other astronaut autobiographies from that era.

FFrench
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posted 01-27-2017 01:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you so much for those very kind words. Here's another recent interview I did about this labor of love.

dss65
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posted 02-07-2017 09:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dss65   Click Here to Email dss65     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Fantastic work, Francis. I won't try to add to all of the insightful reviews already on this string, but I will say that I enjoyed the book immensely. Thanks for your efforts in making Donn's story available to us.

machbusterman
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posted 02-08-2017 07:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for machbusterman   Click Here to Email machbusterman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My copy arrived in pristine condition from Farthest Reaches last night. Very much looking forward to reading it.

Ted
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posted 04-21-2017 05:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ted     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great read Francis. Just a pity there's not more of it. Thanks for giving the "forgotten astronaut" a voice.

By the way, did Walt Cunningham read/like it?

Lev M
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Registered: Nov 2012

posted 05-09-2017 01:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lev M   Click Here to Email Lev M     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What an interesting reading (listening, actually)! Not a kid friendly, I would say, so I can't buy a hard copy and get it signed by for my kids.

Thank you Francis for making it available. It's a must have book for real collectors and space enthusiasts.

FFrench
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Posts: 3145
From: San Diego
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 05-10-2017 09:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you very much - those words mean a great deal after all the years of work. I look forward to seeing many of you at Spacefest next month.

To answer one question, Walt and I talked about the book a lot beforehand, and he and I saw our very first printed copy together while at the Cape. But I did not want to put him in the position of commenting on Donn's very candid and emotionally raw views, views just as raw as in his own outstanding book.


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