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Author Topic:   An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth (Chris Hadfield)
Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 07-02-2013 01:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Chris Hadfield's book lands on Oct. 29:
In "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth," Little, Brown writes, Hadfield 'takes readers deep into his years of training and space exploration to show how to make the impossible possible. Through eye-opening, entertaining stories filled with the adrenaline of launch, the mesmerizing wonder of spacewalks, and the measured, calm responses mandated by crises, he explains how conventional wisdom can get in the way of real achievement — and happiness. His own extraordinary education in space has taught him some counterintuitive lessons: Don't visualize success, do care what others think, and always sweat the small stuff.'"

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-02-2013 01:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Little, Brown and Company will publish the U.S. and world imprint; Random House Canada will publish the Canadian imprint and has signed a two-book deal with Chris Hadfield.

Hadfield will also record an audio book version of "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth."

Random House Canada has established commanderhadfield.com for information about the book.

onesmallstep
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posted 07-02-2013 02:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for onesmallstep   Click Here to Email onesmallstep     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Looking forward to this book, and his subsequent ones. It's amazing that in addition to his astronaut duties, he found the time to play in the Max-Q all-astronaut rock band AND fly a restored 1950s-era Sabre fighter jet in airshows during the 100th anniversary of powered flight in Canada. A great ambassador for his country, both on and off the planet!

cspg
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posted 07-03-2013 02:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
by Chris Hadfield
As Commander of the International Space Station, Chris Hadfield captivated the world with stunning photos and commentary from space. Now, in his first book, Chris offers readers extraordinary stories from his life as an astronaut, and shows how to make the impossible a reality.

Chris Hadfield decided to become an astronaut after watching the Apollo moon landing with his family on Stag Island, Ontario, when he was nine years old, and it was impossible for Canadians to be astronauts. In 2013, he served as Commander of the International Space Station orbiting the Earth during a five-month mission. Fulfilling this lifelong dream required intense focus, natural ability and a singular commitment to "thinking like an astronaut." In An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth, Chris gives us a rare insider's perspective on just what that kind of thinking involves, and how earthbound humans can use it to achieve success and happiness in their lives.

Astronaut training turns popular wisdom about how to be successful on its head. Instead of visualizing victory, astronauts prepare for the worst; always sweat the small stuff; and do care what others think. Chris shows how this unique education comes into play with dramatic anecdotes about going blind during a spacewalk, getting rid of a live snake while piloting a plane, and docking with space station Mir when laser tracking systems fail at the critical moment. Along the way, he shares exhilarating experiences, and challenges, from his 144 days on the ISS, and provides an unforgettable answer to his most-asked question: What's it really like in outer space?

Written with humour, humility and a profound optimism for the future of space exploration, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth offers readers not just the inspiring story of one man's journey to the ISS, but the opportunity to step into his space-boots and think like an astronaut — and renew their commitment to pursuing their own dreams, big or small.

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Canada (Oct 29 2013)
  • ISBN-10: 0345812700
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345812704
The Random House Canada edition is available through Amazon.ca.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-04-2013 04:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Chris Hadfield on Twitter:
Free Astronaut Mustache! Order the ASTRONAUT'S GUIDE, mail in receipt, get yours (for lucky US folks, @littlebrown)
To get your free "Official Commander Hadfield Mustache" you email your mailing address and a copy of your receipt for the U.S. Little Brown edition of the book to littlebrown@hbgusa.com.

Tykeanaut
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posted 10-23-2013 10:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Book of the week: An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth

BBC Radio 4 FM only.
9.45 am (repeated at 12.30am)
Monday 10/28 to Friday 11/1

Chris Hadfield recalls remarkable stories from his career of more than 4,000 hours in space travel, starting with the moment it all began - when in 1969 he watched Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon.

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters and read by Garrick Hagon.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-23-2013 10:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Random House Canada is counting down the days to the release of Chris Hadfield's book with a series of "Astronaut's Guide" videos. Here's the first two:

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-28-2013 07:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
More videos from the series:

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-28-2013 07:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
Astronaut Chris Hadfield launching on book tour for 'Guide to Life on Earth'

Astronaut Chris Hadfield is embarking on another mission around the planet. This time however, he is not heading into outer space, but instead sharing "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth."

Hadfield, who was the first Canadian to walk in space and command the International Space Station, is launching on a four-country, three-month tour to promote the release of his first book. In "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth," Hadfield recounts what his three missions and 166 days in orbit taught him about "ingenuity, determination and being prepared for anything," as his memoirs' subtitle reads.

"An Astronaut's Guide" is being published Tuesday (Oct. 29) in Hadfield's home country by Random House Canada and in the United States and elsewhere around the globe by Little, Brown and Company. The same day, Hadfield is scheduled to attend the first of more than two dozen book signings.

See here for further discussion of Chris Hadfield's book signing tour.

cspg
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posted 10-29-2013 09:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is it me or there seems to be a lot of marketing behind this book (compared to other astronaut-related works)? Not a bad thing, just curious.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-29-2013 09:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hadfield has recently enjoyed considerably more fame than other astronaut-authors in a number of years, and as such he is more marketable. His on-orbit videos and tweets drew the attention of millions...

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 10-29-2013 12:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
Is it me or there seems to be a lot of marketing behind this book (compared to other astronaut-related works)? Not a bad thing, just curious.

Social media - and if you use "just" Twitter, Facebook and YouTube - has exploded in popularity and use over the past few years. Hadfield's use of such sites has made him a household name and people eager for more. I don't doubt had such things existed earlier, there would be similar interest in other astronaut books. (I can picture Mullane's YouTube videos and Twitter feed in conjunction with 'Riding Rockets,' - and how recent was his book? - or what Brian O'Leary would do with social media and 'The Making of an Ex-Astronaut'....)

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-29-2013 11:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's the culmination of the Astronaut's Guide video series (which Hadfield wrote on reddit was his son's idea):
A little over a month ago I challenged my son to make a video for my book launch that wasn't just some over-the-top ad. Here's what he came up with.

WAWalsh
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posted 11-06-2013 09:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for WAWalsh   Click Here to Email WAWalsh     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As there has not yet been a review of the book here, I am providing an enthusiastic thumbs up. It is very readable, provides some good details about life on the ISS, use of the SIMs and preparation and insight into Col. Hadfield's approach to work and life. Worth the time to read.

On another note, it is also appealing to my younger son (age 12). To my surprise, he was familiar with Col. Hadfield from his YouTube videos (how to drink water in space, etc.) and my son was trilled to get a signed copy and has been plowing through it.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 11-06-2013 10:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One of the problems is that I don't know how to describe the book. It's that good. I was hoping to get my copy before I went on holiday, but it was waiting for me when I got back. I sat down and read it on three days - not that I'm a voracious reader, but I didn't want to put the book down and go to work.

'Wow' doesn't describe it adequately. I'm eagerly awaiting Hadfield's other books. If he can resonate like this on an adult level, can't wait to see what Hadfield does with a children's book.

DChudwin
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posted 11-10-2013 11:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DChudwin   Click Here to Email DChudwin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just finished reading perhaps the best book ever written about what it means to be an astronaut and what it is like to live and work in space.

I have read dozens of space books since 1959, but Chris Hadfield's book "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth" is different. While he includes some biography, the book is about how astronauts think and how they approach training and spaceflight. More than that, he suggests that these lessons can help us in our daily lives.

The prose is beautifully done and I agree with most of Col. Hadfield's counter-intuitive ideas ("sweat the small stuff"). While most of us are not highly competent, competitive, hyper-motivated, over-acheivers like many astronauts, we can learn from their hard-earned experiences getting off-planet.

alanh_7
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posted 11-18-2013 01:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Check out Chris Hadfield on 60 Minutes.

WAWalsh
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posted 11-18-2013 02:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for WAWalsh   Click Here to Email WAWalsh     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Also on NPR's "Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me" this past weekend.

JBoe
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posted 11-18-2013 05:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JBoe   Click Here to Email JBoe     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by alanh_7:
Check out Chris Hadfield on 60 Minutes.
I found it interesting that at 6:50 of the 60 Minutes special that Hadfield was in his orange pressure suit awaiting his Atlantis launch and had a U.S. flag on his suit vice a Canadian one.

alanh_7
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posted 11-18-2013 06:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I guess you go with the flag of the guys giving you the ride.

JBoe
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posted 11-18-2013 06:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JBoe   Click Here to Email JBoe     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This may be something to look into. I always thought on official photos, either in the spacesuit, pressure suit, or flight suit, they had the flag of their nationality.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 11-18-2013 07:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I haven't seen it, but which shoulder? I always thought it was the host country on your left, your country of origin on your right, at least with the US spacecsuits.

p51
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posted 11-18-2013 07:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for p51   Click Here to Email p51     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
Is it me or there seems to be a lot of marketing behind this book (compared to other astronaut-related works)? Not a bad thing, just curious.
I agree. I've seen the Colonel on several talk shows and heard him give interviews over the radio several times in the last month or so, far more than any other astronaut book in years.

I also agree it's not a bad thing at all (I've ordered a signed copy from JSC), but I think yours was a fair observation.

JBoe
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posted 11-18-2013 07:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JBoe   Click Here to Email JBoe     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hart Sastrowardoyo:
I haven't seen it, but which shoulder? I always thought it was the host country on your left, your country of origin on your right, at least with the US spacecsuits.

It was on his left, so that would be probably correct then.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-25-2013 09:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
Astronaut Chris Hadfield's guide to writing 'An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth'

If you're wondering what gift to get the astronauts aboard the International Space Station this holiday season (and if not, why aren't you?), you can rule out a certain bestselling book.

"This is 'An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth,'" Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield says. "It is for reading before and after, I think, not while you are in space."

For the rest of us Earthlings though, Hadfield's "Guide" is fair game — as many have already found out.

Ronpur
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posted 11-26-2013 11:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ronpur   Click Here to Email Ronpur     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I received mine yesterday. Three chapters in and I can't put it down! A fantastic read!

Tykeanaut
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posted 11-28-2013 09:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just found this very interesting and entertaining interview with Chris Hadfield from Radio Noon Montreal yesterday.

garymilgrom
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posted 12-08-2013 08:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is a very good astronaut biography. Unlike some others who tell the technical stories or expose behind the scenes politics, Col. Hadfield takes a very personal approach to his tale. We learn of his early yearning to become an astronaut and then how he followed a plan to maximize his chances of making that dream come true.

The way he goes about planning for success is to train as if it's going to happen. For instance if he's going to be at the same concert as Elton John, he learns to play Rocket Man in the off chance an opportunity occurs to perform with the rock star. He takes this advance effort to extremes, both in his personal and professional life. These stories are repeated many times in the first half of the book as we learn how he prepared in advance for many different situations. I found these sections slow going.

But the book quickly gets back on track - describing an astronaut's career. Col. Hadfield waited a decade between some flights and he describes what astronauts do when they're not flying very well. He also tells specific stories of how others support a space mission - instead of the usual "their are thousands of people behind us" we get specific instances of how an individual (say the CAPCOM) participates in the planning, the sims, then the flight itself; becoming integral to its success. He talks at length at supporting other astronauts, doing your job, maintaining a positive attitude and always trying to contribute more. Although well written it sometimes seems this guy has never had a sad moment or a bad day his entire life.

Another well written part is the description between visiting space for a week and living in space for months at a time. They offer surprisingly different rewards, and the difficult recovery after returning from a long duration mission is described in detail too.

In my opinion Col. Hadfield may be this generation's Buzz Aldrin in that he has the excitement and desire to spread the word on how important space exploration is, plus the enthusiasm and stamina for the media appearances, video postings and tweets from space that are required these days. By the way the book describes how his Space Oddity video was produced and it's not as simple as it looks. And perhaps most important, he's a Toronto Maple Leafs fan.

In summary this is a great book and was hard to put down. It will be interesting to see what Colonel Chris Hadfield gets up to next.

alanh_7
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posted 12-08-2013 09:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree with the above review. I looked at this book as almost a self help "guide" to Hadfield's success much of which could also be useful to our own day to day lives.

He is not saying "this is what will work for you" as some authors do. He is saying "this is how I did things or worked towards my goals and objectives and these methods could be used by others in their own lives".

Hadfield goes into his achievements and accomplishments in a very low key manor. For example he never talks about the fact that he his a two time winner of the NATO William Tell Fighter intercept competitions.

The recurring theme I found interesting the approach of the astronaut corps is "sweat the small stuff and that will often prevent you having to sweat the big stuff" How often could we use that advise in our own lives?

Hadfield's book was a refreshing change to some astronaut biographies in his approach to life in general.

cspg
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posted 12-12-2013 01:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by garymilgrom:
It will be interesting to see what Colonel Chris Hadfield gets up to next.
A calendar: Major Tom's Wonderful World: Photographs of Earth from Expedition 35

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-12-2013 01:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't see anything that suggests Chris Hadfield had any participation (or perhaps even knowledge) of that calendar being produced.

cspg
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posted 12-12-2013 02:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well then, others are surfing on his popularity to sell their products, as with the book with "Chris Hadfield's Photographs of Earth."

Ronpur
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posted 12-21-2013 07:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ronpur   Click Here to Email Ronpur     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I enjoyed this book a great deal, and as others have said, I enjoyed, and will hopefully benefit from his philosophy on living. I did not expect this, but it has really inspired me.

I also learned something about ISS operations that I never knew. I had no idea that the US and Russian crews were so separate on their tasks, and that there is so little interaction between the crews. I had no idea that even the EVAs are not fully supported by the entire crew, and others were busy on their own tasks while EVAs were happening.

Teacher in space
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posted 12-22-2013 02:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Teacher in space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Reading this was a learning lesson in many ways. I really enjoyed many stories of space exploration history and people behind them.

The thing most "hit" me was the idea that astronauts are like school students for all they career. You cant become astronaut if you dont love learning new!

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