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  Help identifying Skylab book for young readers

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Author Topic:   Help identifying Skylab book for young readers
brotherjohn
New Member

Posts: 3
From: Hickory, Mississippi, USA
Registered: Apr 2013

posted 04-29-2013 10:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for brotherjohn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good day! At some point in my life I read a children's book (probably written at a middle school/junior high level) about the Skylab missions. I enjoyed it very much at the time, and have wanted to purchase a copy of it so that I could re-read it.

In the book it said that before one of the later missions, the food supplies in Skylab were at a low level (perhaps because of the overheating that had occurred when the space station was deployed.) Because of this, the astronauts carried a supply of "food bars" that came in flavors like chocolate, strawberry, and crispy rice. These were eaten to supplement the remaining rations aboard the space station. As I remember, it seemed to be that the astronauts sort of limited their food intake to make it last longer.

Does anybody have an idea what the name of the book is and who the author might be? Any comments on the situation I have described?

I am immensely enjoying this site. You are all some well-read, interesting folks to know!

pollux
Member

Posts: 46
From: London, England
Registered: Dec 2005

posted 04-29-2013 11:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for pollux     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Welcome to collectSPACE.

To be honest, ALL books will mention the food bars, as that's what happened. The decision was made to extend the last mission from 56 to 84 days. There was only enough food for the shorter mission, so this needed to be supplemented with food that would be compact and light enough to take up with the crew. They ate the high energy bars every third day.

As far as books go, a quick Google search has shown a handful of books aimed at children. Personally, I recall reading "A House in Space" by Henry SF Cooper when I was around the age you mention, so it was obviously suitable. Do you remember if it was just a small book (say, 40-60 pages) or a little more substantial (the one I mention above is around 200 pages)?

brotherjohn
New Member

Posts: 3
From: Hickory, Mississippi, USA
Registered: Apr 2013

posted 04-29-2013 12:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for brotherjohn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hello, pollux, and thank you for the kind welcome!

As I remember, the book was a pretty substantial one--probably in the 200 page range that you are mentioning.

It's interesting, I can't remember WHEN I read this book, only that I read the book in a classroom. It could have been when I was school (and there was nothing going on in class that day and I pulled it off a shelf) or as a schoolteacher (doing standardized testing in somebody else's classroom and pulling off the shelf.) I remember that I really enjoyed it.

I have just ordered a copy of the book you suggested off of amazon.com. I got it for the whopping price of 15 cents (plus 3.99 shipping and handling.) I'll let you know how this turns out when I receive it.

Thanks so much for your help!

cspg
Member

Posts: 4046
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 04-29-2013 02:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Welcome too!

Pollux wrote "when I was around the age you mention" - but when was that? Any detail you could remember about the book (dimension for example)?

I was wondering if the two NASA SP's (Skylab, Our First Space Station SP-400; Skylab, Classroom in Space SP-401) would be considered "junior-high level" type of books. Both are online from NASA's History Office (and, no, I'm not bragging! )

All times are CT (US)

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