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  How NASA Learned To Fly In Space (David Harland)

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Author Topic:   How NASA Learned To Fly In Space (David Harland)
Steven Kaplan
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Posts: 110
From:
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 09-27-2004 07:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Steven Kaplan   Click Here to Email Steven Kaplan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just finished David Harland's account of Project Gemini, "How NASA Learned to Fly in Space" and thoroughly enjoyed it.

Harland does a great job of explaining the nuts and bolts of this often overlooked program. His account of the intricacies of mastering both rendezvous and EVA demonstrate that without Gemini, Apollo just doesn't happen.

Many great photos accompany the text, and it is too bad that Apogee decided against a CD with this book. Highly recommended.

heng44
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Posts: 2665
From: Netherlands
Registered: Nov 2001

posted 09-27-2004 08:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I know, they are my photos!

Seriously, the book is a great account of the exciting Gemini missions. David Harland uses a lot of the air-to-ground conversations to bring the missions alive. Highly recommended.

Fra Mauro
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Posts: 1097
From: Bethpage, N.Y.
Registered: Jul 2002

posted 04-19-2009 09:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just finished reading this book from the Apogee series and I highly recommend it. It not the first book you should read about Gemini since it is a bit detailed and assumes you know something about the program but it is a definite read.

collocation
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Posts: 369
From: McLean, VA, USA
Registered: Feb 2004

posted 04-19-2009 09:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for collocation   Click Here to Email collocation     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would concur, I read this book several years ago, a bit technical, but highly recommended.

garymilgrom
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Posts: 1719
From: Atlanta, GA, USA
Registered: Feb 2007

posted 03-12-2014 10:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just finished this book and concur with the above reviews. This is the best book I've read about Project Gemini and how it paved the way for succesfull Apollo flights. The book concentrates on the operations behind the flights. These show how NASA became familiar with tight launch windows, EVA problems and most importantly rendezvous procedures over the time of these flights. The book does a very good job of describing complex events like different forms of rendezvous and how NASA was doing things in later flights that they never would have attempted without the experience gained in earlier ones.

While most of us are familiar with how the Apollo flights progressed step by step to their ultimate goal, this book shows how Project Gemini used the same processes to build a solid understanding of orbital operations and long duration flight for American manned spacecraft.

hermit
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Posts: 121
From: Scotland
Registered: Jun 2009

posted 03-12-2014 12:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for hermit   Click Here to Email hermit     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Watch out for a book about the Gemini spacecraft by David Woods and David Harland that's coming out this summer from Haynes publishing in the UK. It is half technical exposition of the systems, and half mission reviews. Sort of 'How NASA Learned to Fly in Space' meets 'How Apollo Flew to the Moon'.

GoesTo11
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Posts: 1125
From: Denver, CO USA
Registered: Jun 2004

posted 03-12-2014 01:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GoesTo11   Click Here to Email GoesTo11     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by hermit:
...coming out this summer from Haynes publishing in the UK.

Can I assume that's another in the Haynes Manual series, like we've seen for Apollo, ISS, Shuttle, etc.? Those are fun books...looking forward to one on Gemini!

hermit
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Posts: 121
From: Scotland
Registered: Jun 2009

posted 03-12-2014 02:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for hermit   Click Here to Email hermit     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, the Haynes Manual series.

cspg
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Posts: 4491
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 03-12-2014 04:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Trying to steal my "job"?

Haven't found it anywhere.

wdw
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Posts: 38
From: Scotland
Registered: May 2007

posted 03-13-2014 10:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for wdw     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Our Gemini Haynes Manual is still very much in production. It's in a good place but Haynes have yet to announce it officially.

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