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Author Topic:   Flight Path (CA): Space Exploration Gallery
Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 37630
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-01-2016 08:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Flight Path Museum and Learning Center release
Flight Path Museum Unveils New Space Exploration Gallery

Museum's newest gallery features the history and development of space flight through a brilliantly colorful exhibit entitled, "The Journey Begins"

The Flight Path Museum and Learning Center celebrated the grand opening of its new Space Exploration Gallery that spotlights the history and development of space flight. Dignitaries, elected officials and invited guests were in attendance for the formal ribbon cutting ceremony and media preview.

Flight Path's Space Exploration Gallery showcases a colorful and informative timeline of space exploration history together with a number of important space artifacts, according to Flight Path President Lynne Adelman. Included is the flight suit of astronaut Gen. Kevin P. Chilton, commander of the Endeavour and Atlantis space shuttles.

"We are very grateful for the support of General Chilton, the Aerospace Corporation and others who made possible this major addition to Flight Path's educational program," said Adelman.

The gallery includes colorful wall graphics and text, video presentations and artifact display cases, providing visitors of all ages with an educational and entertaining walk-through experience. Also, the Aero Club of Southern California's Howard Hughes Memorial award trophy been relocated to the new gallery. Spearheading development of the project was a museum committee headed by Col. Stephen Soukup (USAF-ret.) of the Flight Path Board of Directors.

"The Flight Path Museum and Learning Center is a great place for students and anyone who is interested in aviation or aerospace to learn more about the role this industry played in Los Angeles' history," said Council member Mike Bonin, who represents LAX and nearby communities on the Los Angeles City Council. "This new exhibit will invigorate the imaginations and curiosity of kids throughout Los Angeles and could very likely be the driving force behind our next aviation pioneer or astronaut. I congratulate the Flight Path Museum and Learning Center of Southern California and look forward to checking out the exhibit soon."

"We are celebrating the opening of Flight Path Museum's first exhibition dedicated entirely to space, and space exploration," said Dr. Malina Hills, vice president of Space Program Operations at The Aerospace Corporation. "I'm so proud that Aerospace could be a part of it. It is the corporation's hope the next generation of scientists and engineers will be inspired by something they read, saw, or experienced right here at the Flight Path Museum."

"The Flight Path Learning Center and Museum is a true treasure for our LAX neighbors and to aviation enthusiasts throughout Southern California," said Trevor Daley, Deputy Executive Director/Chief of External Affairs for Los Angeles World Airports. "The addition of the new space exploration gallery that highlights space flight is a great showcase display that highlights the contributions of many of our local aerospace companies. The partnership between Flight Path and Aerospace Corporation in El Segundo created a wonderful space that truly will educate and inspire our nations next space explorers."

The new Space Exploration Gallery at Flight Path Museum is available for visitors Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., except on major holidays. Admission and parking are free.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 37630
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-01-2017 08:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Flight Path Museum release
Re-entry Debris from Delta II Rocket Lands at Flight Path Museum

The only part of the rocket to survive the scorching heat of re-entry is now on permanent display exclusively at Flight Path Museum at LAX.

It literally fell from outer space — debris from a Delta II rocket that returned from orbit in 2011, blazing through Earth's atmosphere and ultimately crashing into a farmer's field in Uruguay.

The only part of the rocket to survive the scorching heat of re-entry was the titanium motor case, which is now on permanent display exclusively at Flight Path Museum at LAX.

"It really is an exciting artifact to see, and is the most recent addition to the Museum's Space Gallery Exhibit," said retired Air Force Col. Steve Soukup, the Board Member who arranged to have the reentry artifact placed on display at the museum.

Standing at five-feet and weighing about 120-pounds, the reentry debris artifact was once the case of the third stage, solid-propellant motor of a Delta II rocket. This Delta II rocket launched the GPS IIR-10 satellite into space on December 21, 2003 from Cape Canaveral.

The third stage motor case remained in orbit for more than seven years before atmospheric drag caused its orbit to decay. On March 3, 2011, the stage came flaming through the atmosphere and crashed in a farm field near Artigas, Uruguay. The farmer witnessed the fireball streak across the sky and felt the earth shake when it crashed in his field.

It's easy to identify the areas of the motor case burned and melted by the searing heat of re-entry. The "bluing" is a result of the intense heating, which also melted wire harnesses, hardware and electronics mounted on the case. "The difference between the motor case before launch and after reentry are quite remarkable," said Col. Soukup. "It's wonderful the Museum can give visitors the opportunity to examine our space debris for free, and in such an intimate environment."

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