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  Exhibit: Purdue Univ.'s Place in Space

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Author Topic:   Exhibit: Purdue Univ.'s Place in Space
Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 29398
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-22-2009 10:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Purdue University release
'Purdue's Place in Space: From the Midwest to the Moon' goes online

An exhibit featuring mementos, artifacts and personal papers from Neil Armstrong, Gene Cernan and other Purdue University astronaut alumni has gone digital.

Purdue Libraries' Archives and Special Collections, with help from Lockheed Martin, has placed digital images and information online from its entire 136-item exhibit of "Purdue's Place in Space: From the Midwest to the Moon." The display, in the new Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives & Special Collections Research Center on the fourth floor of the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education Library in Stewart Center, is open through Oct. 30.


Neil Armstrong's personal slide rule. Credit: Purdue

In addition to Armstrong and Cernan, the exhibit includes items from Roy Bridges Jr., Roger Chaffee, Virgil Gus Grissom, Jerry Ross, Janice Voss and Donald Williams. Sections also include the aviation histories of Lafayette and Purdue, which was the nation's first university to offer college credit for flight training.

The exhibit has been very popular, but until now the audience has been limited to individuals who were able to visit the Purdue campus. “By creating an online version of the exhibit, we are able to share the historic documents and photographs that illustrate Purdue’s rich aviation history with people around the world, regardless of time or place," said professor Sammie Morris, university archivist and head of the Division of Archives and Special Collections. "Researchers and the public will discover items in the exhibit that they have not seen before. Some of the many treasures in the exhibit include flight logs and handwritten notes from astronauts, artifacts carried into space, yearbook photographs of the astronauts, and even Neil Armstrong’s homework from his days as a student at Purdue."

The "Purdue Place in Space" exhibit was put together to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Armstrong's historic walk on the moon and the university's rich space heritage. Within the past year, both Armstrong and Cernan - the first person to walk on the moon and the most recent to do so - have begun the process of donating personal papers to the university.

Archives and Special Collections also houses the George Palmer Putnam Collection of Amelia Earhart papers, the world's largest compilation of papers, memorabilia and artifacts related to the late aviator who once worked as a Purdue staff member. Personal papers of Ralph Johnson, a 1930 Purdue graduate in mechanical engineering and a flight pioneer who was the first person to document aircraft landing procedures that are still used today, also are there.

The public can visit the display in the Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives & Special Collections Research Center through Oct. 30. The exhibit is open 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. Groups wanting to schedule a tour may call 765-494-2839.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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Posts: 2405
From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 10-22-2009 12:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Noticed in the exhibit that Williams' contingency deorbit prep booklet has the mission number, 51D, added over the original mission number. So the question is: What was the original mission number? It can't be 51E, since the 51D logo (with the Discovery mission patch appears), unless the covers with the mission number was printed first, and then the mission patch second.

Or possibly, there is a mission number, possibly STS-23, and to lesson the confusion (somewhat) they used 51D since everyone outside of NASA was calling it that anyway.

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 29398
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-22-2009 12:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The 51D logo may have been pasted over the 51E insignia, just as the mission designation was (and judging by the uneven border along the top of the logo, that may be what happened).

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