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Author Topic:   Apollo 14's Moon Trees and descendants
Gordon Reade
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posted 09-06-2003 06:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gordon Reade   Click Here to Email Gordon Reade     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
The "Moon Trees"

Apollo 14 launched in the late afternoon of January 31, 1971 on what was to be our third trip to the lunar surface. Five days later Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell walked on the Moon while Stuart Roosa, a former U.S. Forest Service smoke jumper, orbited above in the command module. Packed in small containers in Roosa's personal kit were hundreds of tree seeds, part of a joint NASA/USFS project. Upon return to Earth, the seeds were germinated by the Forest Service. Known as the "Moon Trees", the resulting seedlings were planted throughout the United States (often as part of the nation's bicentennial in 1976) and the world. They stand as a tribute to astronaut Roosa and the Apollo program.

The project began after Roosa was chosen for the Apollo 14 mission. Ed Cliff, Chief of the Forest Service, knew of Stuart Roosa from his days as a smoke jumper and contacted him about bringing seeds into space. Stan Krugman of the Forest Service was put in charge of the project and selected the seeds for the experiment. Seeds were chosen from five different types of trees: Loblolly Pine, Sycamore, Sweetgum, Redwood, and Douglas Fir. The seeds were classified and sorted, and control seeds were kept on Earth for later comparison. Roosa carried about 400 - 500 seeds in his personal kit which stayed with him as he orbited the Moon in the command module "Kitty Hawk" in February, 1971. Unfortunately, the seed cannisters burst open during the decontamination procedures after their return to Earth, and the seeds got mixed together and were presumed to be no longer viable.

Stan Krugman had the seeds sent to the southern Forest Service station in Gulfport, Mississippi and to the western station in Placerville, California to attempt germination. Surprisingly, nearly all the seeds germinated successfully, and the Forest Service had some 420 to 450 seedlings after a few years (some from cuttings). Some of these were planted with their earth-bound counterparts as controls, (as would be expected, after over twenty years there is no discernable difference) but most were given away in 1975 and 1976 to many state forestry organizations to be planted as part of the nation's bicentennial celebration. These trees were southern and western species, so not all states received trees. A Loblolly Pine was planted at the White House, and trees were planted in Brazil, Switzerland, and presented to the Emperor of Japan, among others. Trees have also been planted in Washington Square in Philadelphia, at Valley Forge, in the International Forest of Friendship, and at various universities and NASA centers. The Moon Tree shown at top left is a sycamore growing at Koch Girl Scout Camp in Cannelton, Indiana and at top right at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. A list of Moon Tree locations can be found on NASA's website.

Stuart Roosa was born on 16 August 1933, in Durango, Colorado. He worked for the Forest Service in the early 1950's as a smoke jumper fighting fires and later joined the Air Force and became a test pilot. He was one of 19 people selected for the astronaut class of 1966 and was part of the astronaut support crew for Apollo 9. Following Apollo 14, Roosa was backup command module pilot for Apollo's 16 and 17. He then worked on the Space Shuttle program until his retirement as a Colonel in the Air Force in 1976, the time when many of his trees were being planted.

Sadly, Stuart Roosa passed away in December, 1994. The Moon Trees continue to flourish, a living monument to our first visits to the Moon and a fitting memorial to Stuart Roosa. Believed locations of some Moon Trees are listed below, but no list was ever kept nor any systematic tracking made of the disposition of all the trees. If you know of a Moon Tree, please send a message.

What's really cool is you can buy seeds from the moon trees. They have my order.

spaceuk
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posted 09-07-2003 03:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
These come in a small tin with a few seeds wrapped in polythene package and a short history. I've had one for some years now and it is neat.

STEVE SMITH
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posted 09-07-2003 04:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for STEVE SMITH   Click Here to Email STEVE SMITH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've ordered mine. I love tangible history like this.

RichieB16
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posted 09-08-2003 01:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for RichieB16   Click Here to Email RichieB16     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hey, one of those Apollo 14 trees planted by the forest service is on my school's grounds - I didn't know that!

Gordon Reade
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posted 09-08-2003 09:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gordon Reade   Click Here to Email Gordon Reade     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I ordered both kits, the one with the seeds and the other with the planting kit and the 1 to 2 year old sapling they say is 8 inches to 3 feet tall at the time of shipping. I'll post again to let you know how long it took for them to arrive and what sort of shape they are in.

Also I'm planning a drive to Monterey, Calif. (about 80 miles south of where I live) to have a look at the Moon Tree there. I think taking those seeds on Apollo 14 was a great idea. My only regret is that I can't thank Roosa as he is no longer with us.

It is interesting though that from more than 400 trees we only know the whereabouts of 45. I guess that's what happens when records are not kept. NASA should have flown more seeds to the moon and they should have made sure that all the countries on Earth were given a number of saplings. If they had ever major city would have a Moon Tree.

Gordon Reade
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posted 09-12-2003 05:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gordon Reade   Click Here to Email Gordon Reade     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Update: I ordered two Moon Sycamore Sapling and they arrived today. I paid extra to have them express mailed. It took three days for them to reach me. I live in California and they came from Florida.

Anyway both saplings are about two feet tall and in perfect condition. They have six or seven large leaves each and they are green and healthy. I'm also very pleased with the planting kit.

This is a really great space collectible!

Gordon Reade
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posted 09-13-2003 12:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gordon Reade   Click Here to Email Gordon Reade     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A small disappointment. I'm still very happy with my moon trees, they are doing great. However since my last post I read the certificate of authenticity that accompanies each sapling. It reads in part, "The entire mission (Apollo 14) lasted for 9 hours, 1 minute and 57 seconds."

The only reason I bought the trees is I'm a space collector. As such I know that Apollo 14's flight time was more than 216 hours, lunar surface stay time was more than 33 hours and the duration of excursions was more than 9 hours.

I'd be embarrassed to show the certificate of authenticity to a fellow collector. If I did he would most likely laugh. It's a real shame that the people who sell these trees care so little for their history.

Andy McCulley
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posted 09-16-2003 08:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Andy McCulley   Click Here to Email Andy McCulley     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I took the liberty of sending part of Gordon's post regarding the inaccuracy of the certificate to Historic Trees. Apparantly they do care. The following is a part of the response I received:
How right you are. We are really embarrassed by this. We have corrected our certificate of authenticity to reflect this change and I am in the process of making sure our website reflects the correct information as well.
Gordon, why don't you give them a call, maybe they will ship you one of the corrected certificates.

My tree comes in the spring.

Gordon Reade
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posted 09-16-2003 10:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gordon Reade   Click Here to Email Gordon Reade     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It seems our work is never done.

Last weekend I drove down to Monterey California to see the moon tree they have there. It's an absolute beautiful Coast Redwood in a gorgeous park like setting. I wish you could all see it. It was surrounded by historic buildings on what must be one of the most beautiful places on earth.

After viewing the tree I wondered into one of those old but very well cared for buildings. The Park Ranger informed me that I was in Colton Hall and we were standing in the very room where the California Constitutional Convention met in 1849, the birth place of present day California.

"Gee I had no idea," I said. "I only came here to have a look at your moon tree."

"Oh," he replied. "And just what is a moon tree?"

At first I though he was joking but he was not. He didn't know. They had all sorts of free brochures on self guided walking tours of the grounds and the Colton Hall Museum but none of them made any mention of the moon tree. The moon tree did have a marker but it was small and unremarkable. Most people would not bother to read something like that.

Now I'll have to write to the people who put out those brochures and ask them to add a few lines about their moon tree. No rest for the wicked.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-15-2005 11:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
AmericanForests.org Press Release
"Moon Tree" Dedication Honors Astronauts

Stuart A. Roosa, the astronaut and smokejumper who carried tree seeds to the moon and back aboard Apollo 14, was remembered along with other astronauts with the planting of a 6-foot descendant of his Moon Trees at Arlington National Cemetery Wednesday, February 9. The tree is intended to honor all NASA's deceased astronauts.

When Apollo 14 launched January 31, 1971, Col, Roosa (USAF) carried with him hundreds of loblolly pine, sycamore, sweetgum, redwood and Douglas-fir seeds. The seed project was intended to honor the U.S. Forest Service, for whom Roosa worked summers as a smokejumper, jumping from airplanes to battle forest fires, early in his career.

The February 9 planting was hosted by the Roosa family. In announcing the event, son Christopher Roosa noted the recent anniversaries of several space program tragedies -- the Apollo I fire and the Challenger and Columbia disasters. "We also recently marked the 10th anniversary of my father passing away," he said. "By planting this tree, we want to honor how he and the other astronauts enriched our lives. They were dedicated, professional patriots who lived their lives on the edge of the envelope. They inspire us to reach for the stars in our own way."

Col. Roosa, who served as command module pilot for the mission, passed away in December 1994; he had planned to plant Moon Sycamore descendants during a spring 1995 tree-planting tour with AMERICAN FORESTS' Historic Tree Nursery. Before his death Roosa expressed a hope that the Moon Tree descendants could encourage Americans to dream as big as the moon while planting trees to improve the quality of life on earth.

Roosa's dream of a "Moon Trees" project appeared to be in doubt when Apollo 14 returned to earth and her contents underwent decontamination. In the process the seed packets burst open and it was feared the seeds had died. A Forest Service staff geneticist planted them anyway, and the seeds sprouted. In 1975, a moon seedling, a sycamore, was planted in front of the Forestry Science Building at Mississippi State University.

Hundreds of so-called Moon Trees were planted around the country - many as part of the nation's Bicentennial in 1976 - including at the White House, NASA facilities, state capitols and at Valley Forge. Moon trees were planted in Brazil and Switzerland and another given to the Emperor of Japan. The Arlington Cemetery tree is a descendent of that first sycamore planted at Mississippi State.

In attendance February 9 were representatives from NASA, the U.S. Forest Service, the military, and students from Cannelton Elementary School in Cannelton, Indiana, where one of the original Moon Trees, a sycamore, is planted at Camp Koch Girl Scout Camp. The tree was "discovered" and adopted in 1996 by Joan Gobel's 3rd grade class.

Although NASA did not keep track of where all the Moon Trees went, it is hoping to track them down now. It has located a few dozen, but there were hundreds planted. Anyone knowing the location of a Moon Tree is asked to contact dwilliam@nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov

spaced out
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posted 02-16-2005 02:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I can't help but think someone (Astronaut Scholarship Fund?) should sell seeds from some of these trees in order to raise funds for space-related charities.

I, for one, would love to grow a descendant from one of Stu's Moon Trees.

Of course you couldn't stop ruthless eBayers from collecting them and selling them (or any old seeds) to make a quick buck but they would never be big money items anway. It would be a gesture of goodwill (effectively a donation) to buy them from the official charity.

jrkeller
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posted 02-16-2005 06:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for jrkeller   Click Here to Email jrkeller     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Somebody already has done that.

spaceuk
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posted 02-16-2005 08:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As noted previously you can buy the descendant seeds. I did it here from UK and still have them here. They come in a small cardboard can with a small packet of seeds and some background notes.

If any one goes to Arlington I'd like see image of where the Roosa seedlings were planted please?

thump
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posted 02-16-2005 04:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for thump   Click Here to Email thump     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anyone know where in the cemetery it was planted?

colonelgumby
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posted 02-16-2005 05:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for colonelgumby   Click Here to Email colonelgumby     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Christmas before last I ordered some of those seed kits from a space store in Houston on-line. Bought I think seven of them to give to nephews and nieces and such and saved one for myself. Not a single tree came up! But I am not the most gifted arborist.

Anyway, thanks for the link you provided here. These guys sell actual living trees. So I just ordered one. Maybe I will have better luck this time. Maybe I should give it to my wife to take care of.

spaced out
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posted 02-17-2005 01:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I should have realised it had already been done, although it's a shame it's not NASA or a space-related charity doing the selling.

Ken Havekotte
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posted 03-21-2005 06:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sorry I missed this post before, but I did attend the "Moon Tree 1976" Planting Ceremony at Kennedy Space Center on June 25, 1976. It was during KSC's Bicentennial Expo on Science & Technology when I was a young college student and "covered" the special "tree" event both as an aerospace journalist and avid enthusiast.

I don't know why, but Col. Roosa wasn't a part of the formal program that day. Instead. Capt. Mitchell made the keynote address for the dedication and planting of the Moon tree.

Afterwards I had a few programs postmarked on the planting day and had Mitchell sign a couple for me on their front surfaces, and yes, I still have one of them in my Mitchell binder collection, but probably gave the other to a collector friend as that was merely 30 years ago.

mmmoo
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posted 07-19-2005 10:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mmmoo   Click Here to Email mmmoo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Article on the Moon Trees grown from seeds taken aboard Apollo 14 by Stu Roosa.

BBC News: Trees... from the Moon

They have been to space and back and virtually all of them lived to tell the tale. There are more of them than there are astronauts and they are found all over the planet.

"They" are Moon Trees grown from seeds which journeyed to the Moon and back on board Apollo 14 in 1971.

Says at the end of the article:
The Moon Trees will be broadcast on BBC Radio Four at 2100 BST on Wednesday 20 July. The producer is Gabi Fisher. If you know the location of a Moon Tree, please let us know by sending an e-mail to moontrees@bbc.co.uk

Andy McCulley
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posted 07-20-2005 10:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Andy McCulley   Click Here to Email Andy McCulley     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I ordered and have one of the second generation trees growing in my yard. I am going have a plaque made describing the tree and dedicating it to my daughters.

Its kinda cool.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-20-2005 02:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE/Science@NASA: In search of Moon Trees
Scattered around our planet are hundreds of creatures that have been to the Moon and back again. None of them are human. They outnumber active astronauts 3:1. And most are missing.

They're trees. "Moon Trees."

mmmoo
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posted 07-26-2005 05:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mmmoo   Click Here to Email mmmoo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The BBC Radio 4 Programme on the Moon Trees is now available to listen to online.

spaceuk
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posted 07-26-2005 10:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've had moon tree seeds for a long while now and have been on display at several exhibitions I have given. I usually display alongside other flown seeds and Ed White's mustard seed display.

I assume the BBC wants to know about matured trees rather than seeds.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-22-2009 04:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA's Apollo 14 legacy continues with Earth Day tree planting

NASA, the National Arboretum and American Forests celebrated Earth Day and the 40th anniversary of the first Apollo moon landing with a tree planting ceremony April 22 at the National Arboretum in Washington, DC. The planting ceremony began at 1 p.m. EDT.

NASA astronaut Stuart Roosa had been a U.S. Forest Service smoke jumper. During the Apollo 14 mission to the moon in 1971, he took along tree seeds from a Loblolly pine, sycamore, sweet gum, redwood, and Douglas fir. After returning to Earth, the U.S. Forest Service germinated these seeds, which grew into first-generation "moon trees."

The moon trees have been planted throughout the United States, but the sycamore is the first to be planted at the National Arboretum. American Forests, the nation's oldest conservation organization, continues the legacy of this Apollo-era program by maintaining second-generation moon trees and making them available through its Historic Trees Program.

A second generation Sycamore "moon" tree was newly planted in celebration of Earth Day and the 40th Anniversary of the first Apollo moon landing at the US National Arboretum, Wednesday, April 22, 2009, in Washington. (NASA/Bill Ingalls)
From left, Dr. Thomas Elias, Director of the US National Arboretum, Dr. Deborah Gangloff, Executive Director of American Forests, and, Mr. Alan Ladwig, Senior Advisor to the NASA Administrator, plant a second generation Sycamore "moon" tree in celebration of Earth Day and the 40th Anniversary of the first Apollo moon landing at the US National Arboretum. (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

GACspaceguy
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posted 04-22-2009 05:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We are in the process of planting a Moon Tree on our property. We have cut down trees and cleared a sunny area, two are on order and will be planting once they arrive. We will post photos once they are in the ground.

spaceychick
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posted 04-24-2009 07:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceychick   Click Here to Email spaceychick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was planning on getting a new tree for my yard so I was THRILLED to learn I could order my own "moon tree!" I've seen a few of the Moon Trees on my travels, and can't wait to have my own -- in fact I ordered 2!

Gordon Reade
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posted 05-12-2009 05:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gordon Reade   Click Here to Email Gordon Reade     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Five and a half years on my Moon Tree is 12 feet tall and it looks great.

I took this photo just this morning. Is that a good looking tree? Yes it is! I only wish that Stuart Roosa was still alive so that I could thank him myself.

mdmyer
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posted 06-12-2009 09:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Last Wednesday Miranda and I traveled to Atchison, KS to visit the Amelia Earhart Birthplace. We also visited the Atchison County Museum. They had some of Amelia’s artifacts there too. We had noticed a bronze statue of Amelia in the flyers promoting the town but we had not found that statue yet. We asked and they said it was in the Forest of Friendship. I asked what that was and they said it was a grove or forest of trees from each of the 50 States and 35 countries. They also said they had a Moon tree there. She asked if I knew what that was and I said I did. Miranda and I decided to go to the Forest of Friendship.

We found the bronze statue of Amelia and it was close to the Moon Tree.

This Moon tree is an American Sycamore. If you look close you can see the statue of Amelia to the right of the tree. Also notice the sidewalk that circles the tree. It is a memorial to the Fallen Astronauts.

This marker is at the edge of the sidewalk leading up to the tree.

mdmyer
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posted 06-12-2009 09:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Then this photo shows the base of the tree. The smaller markers have the names of the crew of Apollo 1 and the Challenger.

This photo shows the same tree but notice the black granite marker in the background. It is a memorial to the crew of the Columbia.

The walkway leading through the Forest of Friendship has about 1,200 markers or names in it of people. Most have played a part in the history of aviation. I thought it was a great tribute and use of the Moon tree.

Before we left I plucked a few seed pods from the branches of the Moon tree. I doubt Stuart would have minded after all he loved trees. I brought them home but then I began to wonder if these seed pods had matured enough to have seeds in them? Can anyone help me out with that? Should I put the pods out and let them dry and then break them open to find the seeds. I have hopes of getting a tree to grow.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-09-2011 01:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA feature
A Race Against Time to Find Apollo 14's Lost Voyagers

In communities all across the U.S., travelers that went to the moon and back with the Apollo 14 mission are living out their quiet lives. The whereabouts of more than 50 are known. Many, now aging, reside in prime retirement locales: Florida, Arizona and California. A few are in the Washington, D.C., area. Hundreds more are out there -- or at least, they were. And Dave Williams of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., wants to find them before it's too late.

The voyagers in question are not astronauts. They're "moon trees" -- redwood, loblolly pine, sycamore, Douglas fir, and sweetgum trees sprouted from seeds that astronaut Stuart Roosa took to the moon and back 40 years ago.

"Hundreds of moon trees were distributed as seedlings," says Williams, "but we don't have systematic records showing where they all went."

And though some of the trees are long-lived species expected to live hundreds or thousands of years, others have started to succumb to the pressures of old age, severe weather and disease. At least a dozen have died, including the loblolly pine at the White House and a New Orleans pine that was damaged by Hurricane Katrina and later removed.

To capture the vanishing historical record, Williams, a curator at the National Space Science Data Center, has been tracking down the trees, dead or alive.

His sleuthing started in 1996, prompted by an email from a third-grade teacher, Joan Goble, asking about a tree at the Camp Koch Girl Scout Camp in Cannelton, Ind. A simple sign nearby read "moon tree."

"At the time, I had never heard of moon trees," Williams says. "The sign had a few clues, so I sent a message to the NASA history office and found more bits and pieces on the web. Then I got in touch with Stan Krugman and got more of the story."

Krugman had been the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service's staff director for forest genetics research in 1971. He had given the seeds to Roosa, who stowed them in his personal gear for the Apollo 14 mission. The seeds were symbolic for Roosa because he had fought wildfires as a smoke jumper before becoming an Air Force test pilot and then an astronaut.

The seeds flew in the command module that Roosa piloted, orbiting the moon 34 times while astronauts Alan Shepard Jr. and Edgar Mitchell walked -- and in Shepard's case, played a little golf -- on the moon.

Back then, biologists weren't sure the seeds would germinate after such a trip. Few experiments of this kind had been done. A mishap during decontamination procedures made the fate of the seeds even less certain: the canister bearing the seeds was exposed to vacuum and burst, scattering its contents.

But the seeds did germinate, and the trees seemed to grow normally. At Forest Service facilities, the moon trees reproduced with regular trees, producing a second generation called half-moon trees.

By 1975, the trees were ready to leave the Forest Service nurseries. One was sent to Washington Square in Philadelphia to be the first moon tree planted as part of the United States Bicentennial celebrations; Roosa took part in that ceremony. Another tree went to the White House. Many more were planted at state capitals, historic locations and space- and forestry-related sites across the country. Gerald Ford, then the president, called the trees "living symbol[s] of our spectacular human and scientific achievements."

When Williams could find no detailed records of which trees went where, he created a webpage to collect as much information as possible. A flurry of emails came in from people who either knew of or came upon the trees.

"About a year after I put the webpage up, someone contacted me and asked why I didn't have the moon tree at Goddard listed," he says. "I hadn't known it was there!" Goddard's moon tree is a sycamore, planted in 1977 next to the visitors' center.

Williams has so far listed trees in 22 states plus Washington, D.C., and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. In many cases, the trees' extraordinary pedigrees were recorded on plaques or in newspaper clippings commemorating the event. Whenever possible, Williams has posted photos of the trees.

Second-generation moon trees, also tracked by Williams, continue to be planted. On Feb. 9, 2005, the 34th anniversary of the Apollo 14 splashdown, a second-generation sycamore was dedicated at Arlington National Cemetery "in honor of Apollo astronaut Stuart A. Roosa and the other distinguished Astronauts who have departed our presence here on earth." At the invitation of Roosa’s family, both Williams and a group of students from Cannelton attended the ceremony.

Another sycamore was planted at the U.S. National Arboretum in Washington, D.C., on April 22 (Earth Day), 2009. And on Feb. 3, 2011, one was planted in Roosa's honor at the Infinity Science Center, which is under construction at NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi.

Rosemary Roosa, the astronaut's daughter, attended the Stennis ceremony. Her father, she says, was a strong supporter of science and space exploration, and she hopes the trees will serve as a reminder of the accomplishments of the U.S. space program as well as an inspiration to "reach for the stars."

People who know of the special legacy of the trees periodically check on them and contact Williams if a tree gets sick or knocked down by a storm. "Sometimes, I get an email from someone who went to the site where the tree used to be, and it's just gone," he says. "There's no sign of it, and we don't know what happened."

"I think when people are aware of the heritage of the trees, they usually take steps to preserve them," Williams adds, recalling one tree that was nearly knocked down during a building renovation. "But sometimes people aren't aware. That's why we want to locate as many as we can soon. We want to have a record that these trees are -- or were -- a part of these communities, before they're gone."

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 02-09-2011 03:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A second-generation (I believe - I know it's not a first-gen) moon tree is on the campus of Georgian Court University, Lakewood, NJ. (GCU is also a NASA Educator Resource Center.) I don't have a photo of it or the plaque, but if need be, I can contact them and get a shot of it.

fredtrav
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Posts: 913
From: Birmingham AL USA
Registered: Aug 2010

posted 02-10-2011 05:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fredtrav   Click Here to Email fredtrav     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There was a front page article in yesterday's Birmingham News about the Moon trees in Alabama.

There are four alive: one sycamore and three loblolly pines. The sycamore is at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens and is about 90 feet tall and is in good health.

One of the loblolly pines is at the State Capitol by a statue of Albert Patterson, one is at Ivy Green in Tuscumbia which is Helen Keller's birthplace and the other is in Troy, AL.

Trees planted in Auburn, the Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, and at the Veterans Hospital in Tuskegee are no longer alive.

All times are CT (US)

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